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Indestructible Man

3.4 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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DVD
(Apr 05, 2007)
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$9.99
DVD
(Nov 27, 2015)
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Remastered Edition
1
$14.95
DVD
(Apr 16, 2013)
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1
$199.99 $420.98
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Editorial Reviews

The scream that shocks the screen with 300,000 volts of horror! He is inhuman...invincible...inescapable...indestructible! Presenting The Indestructible Man, a horror classic now available for the first time on DVD in a 1.85:1 anamorphic film transfer from High-Definition elements! Terror rises from the Los Angeles sewer system as monster icon Lon Chaney (The Wolf Man) returns to life after being executed in the Big House. His first stop? One of LA's sleaziest strip joints! His next stop? Find the partners who double-crossed him following an armored-car holdup and put him in the electric chair. What happens next is a chilling tale of an unstoppable force driven by revenge. For the first time fans will be able to enjoy this science fiction favorite from 1956 in a brand new wide screen anamorphic film transfer mastered from HD, plus bonus features: the original trailer and a ''Remembering Lon'' video featurette.

Product Details

  • Actors: Lon Chaney
  • Directors: Jack Pollexfen
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, Black & White, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Bayview Entertainment/Widowmaker
  • DVD Release Date: April 16, 2013
  • Run Time: 71 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00B8O4V66
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #142,923 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Just watched my copy of Retromedia's remaster of Indestructible Man yesterday and directly compared it to both the Roan and previous Retromedia (Lon Chaney Collection) releases. With all due respect to the previous reviewer, the new transfer blows them both away in terms of sharpness/detail, contrast/brightness, and framing (matted at 1.66:1 anamorphic). There is still the usual minor speckling and blemishing, but this is far and away the best this movie has ever looked on home video, and obsoletes all previous DVD versions. A major upgrade from the Roan and Chaney Collection releases, with much-improved black/white levels and richer grayscale, and the definitive home video edition as of this date.

Does it look like a fully restored, major studio release? Of course not. And if Warner still has materials on this in their vaults and someday releases an official 1.85:1 widescreen, remastered DVD (two big ifs), will it look better than this? Most likely, yes. But, for now, if you want the crispest, best-looking version of Indestructible Man out there, this is it.

Note: The Retromedia DVD is listed on Amazon as the Bayview Entertainment/Widowmaker release, and has the words "Widescreen High Definition Film Transfer" at the top of the front cover and green-tinted likeness of Chaney.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
THE STORY: Lon Chaney is Charles "Butcher" Bensen, a bank robber ratted out by his three criminal co-horts when he keeps the loot from their recent heist and refuses to divulge its whereabouts. Rail-roaded through the system, imprisoned & sentenced to death, Bensen vows to kill the three finks... even if he has to do it from beyond the grave! Luckily for the Butcher, immediately following his execution his body is purchased by an unscrupulous scientist's assistant, for the purpose of conducting unconventional experiments involving cellular regeneration. Robert Shayne (Inspector Henderson from the the 1950's "Superman" TV show), and an uncredited Joe Flynn (Captain Binghamton from "McHale's Navy"), work their medical hocus-pocus on the Butcher's fresh corpse, and before you can say "Leapin' Lazurus!" the Big Guy is lumbering back to life, (understandably NOT in the best of moods), and immediately begins hunting down his former partners. Casey Adams (aka Max Showalter, who played Grandpa Fred in John Hughes' "Sixteen Candles"), is police Lt. Dick Chasen (good lord, was that name intentional?), a by-the-book cop who is determined to get his man, er... corpse, er... whatever, at any cost. He also provides voice-over narration, like many great old 1940's gumshoe flicks, to keep us from getting too confused,.

THOUGHTS: Let's be honest. This is an undeniably silly movie, but there's just something about it. It has a zany charm that I felt the very first time I watched it. This new "Widescreen Edition" is the 2nd or 3rd version of this film I've owned. That's how much I like it. It is goofy as all get out, but has real heart.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film really isn't so bad if you consider a few things. An encouraged guy named Jack Pollexfen (not unlike Ed Wood) had an idea (not unlike Ed Wood) and cast a great actor from the past (not unlike Ed Wood). The difference is that this is a take on "noir", though without the finesse of those earlier films (sorta like Ed Wood). Production values, as in any independent film with a somewhat believable plot, are low. ("Blair Witch Project", though innovative, was not much different). My idea is not to criticize it for its tackiness, but for its idea. The acting isn't that bad. Marian Carr is actually quite effective as the only female lead. Casey Adams was good as he could be; made a big mark on TV in "Green Acres"; it's almost a take on "Dragnet", the hit TV series at the time (though Adams has more life than Jack Webb ever did...). Then there's Lon Chaney, Jr., relegated to idiotic roles because Hollywood never knew what to do with him; with the studio collapse of the early 50's, no one remembered his touching performance as "The Wolf Man" (1941) or his most remarkable performance (as Lenny) in "Of Mice and Men" (1939, directed by Lewis Milestone). Whaddya do with a guy like this? Perhaps he knew that he was "hard to cast", but I beg anyone to say that his heart wasn't in it. Today's wave of independent film is suddenly recognized as a force to be reckoned with; budgets as they are, I think some of the "lousy" films of the 50's tried to do the same thing. They didn't have Miramax to back them...NO ONE, for that matter. Still, I was a part of the Drive-In crowd back then, and I still appreciate this kind of film fare. Even bad independent film should be respected, to a point. The really trashy films will be just that; small moments of ingenuity should be respected.Read more ›
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Format: VHS Tape
This is a fun film. Don't try to electricute Lon Chaney Jr. It will only make him angry. Fun film, w/ lots of 1950's atmosphere. Great entertainment for fans of Chaney (and Sci Fi fans alike). Chaney's mad (insane) rampage throughout this film , is worth watching. Very entertaining and (somewhat) highly recommended.
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