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on February 26, 2017
Like the section in Estonia. Brought a lot of insight on both the country as well as the topic of blockchain
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on February 12, 2017
Excellent book to understand what will be coming in the future. More factual than I expected.
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HALL OF FAMEon February 11, 2017
Author Ross served as Secretary Clinton's senior advisor for innovation. During that time he saw next-generation robotics in South Korea, laser technology used to increase agricultural yields in New Zealand, etc. The near future will see robot suits that allow paraplegics to walk, designer drugs that melt away certain forms of cancer, and computer code used as a weapon to destroy physical infrastructure halfway around the world. The next wave will challenge middle classes across the globe, threatening to return many to poverty. 'The Industries of the Future' s about the next economy.

West Virginia's connections through coal to the industrial North led it to secede from Virginia and the more agricultural South when the American Civil War broke out. Building on its coal boom, West Virginia developed complementary industries. Union Carbide established the world's first petrochemical plant in West Virginia in 1920. Massive amounts of synthetic rubber were needed to meet wartime demands in WWII. Between 1946 and 1982, its revenues increased from about $415 million to over $10 billion and it employed 12,000 in West Virginia. West Virginia's economy has since taken a long downturn.

In the 30 years from 1982 to 2012, India's poverty rate dropped from 60% to 22%, nad life expectancy surged from 49 years to 66. China's poverty rate fell from 84% to 13%, pulling about 600 million out of poverty. It's economy is now 25X larger than 30 years ago.

Japan is home to the longest-living citizens in the world and the biggest elderly population of any country, Between 2010 and 2025, the number of Japanese citizens 65 and older is expected to increase by 7 million - today, it is already 25% of the population, headed for 29% by 2020. With Japan's persistently strict immigration policies (50,000 work visas/year), there will not be enough humans around to serve the need for caretakers. Japan predicts a need for 4 million eldercare nurses by 2025, but there are only 1.5 million now.

Toyota has built a nursing-aide named Robina - 60 kg and 1.2 meters tall, that can communicate using words and gestures. Robina's brother, Humanoid, can do the dishes, take care of your parents when they're sick, and even play the trumpet or violin. Honda has built ASIMO which can follow voice commands, and answer questions - it can help patients get out of bed. Honda has also built a Walking Assist device that wraps around the legs and back of people with weakened leg muscles, giving them extra power to move on their own. Japan operates 310,000 of the 1.4 million industrial robots around the world. It hasn't yet designed robots capable of bathing patients or brushing their teeth.

The genomics market is estimated at over $11 billion in 2013. Future abilities will include liquid biopsies that can detect cancer cells at 1% of the size currently detected with MRI, developing drugs targeted to the genetics of an individual, create 'designer babies,' more mobile-phones medical applications.

Uber will move into parcel delivery, cyberattacks more serious
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on January 30, 2017
A thought provokiing explortation of the potential future industries based on the recent past, and the characteristics which those who would succeed will need, bot individual, societal, and governmental.
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on January 21, 2017
A revolution all should be aware of so they are ready for the coming changes that will affect all our lives. Alec Ross has done his homework and presented his research in an easy to read manner. Have given this book to all of my children and grandchildren so they have a heads up on what is coming and also to give them a chance to decide if they want to be a "giver, a receiver, or both" as the information in this book becomes reality.
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on January 18, 2017
Excellent!
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on January 16, 2017
Wildly interesting book. Gave some great insights for the years to come. I ended up reaching out to the author and he was more than willing to give up some of his time to speak with me about an inquiry I had. I cannot recommend this book enough.
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on January 16, 2017
Learn the authors opinion on what the future holds and how to prepare yourself, your family, and your country for what lies ahead.
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on January 10, 2017
The author brings up some good points. After the first couple of chapters, he sometimes gets repetitive. He is not a futurist. He was a member of Hillary Clinton's State Department, and he reminds you of this in almost every chapter. Depending on your political persuasion, that may affect the credibility of some of his statements. This gave him access to innovative people around the world. He sometimes brags about people he's interviewed and drops little cultural tidbits to show you he's 'in the know', which gets a bit distracting.

Some interesting innovations for cancer are discussed, along with a use for big data that I haven't considered (farming), but it doesn't seem to go far enough.
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on January 7, 2017
I don't know who finds this book insightful. It is like reading the headlines of the economist for a while. not very well written or thoughtful. highly don't recommend.

I can't imagine a world where this person gave thoughtful policy advice. He doesn't understand economics or even the basic principal of shifting labor to capital and innovation. this isn't revolutionary stuff in the history of capitalism.

and the discussion of markets - he clearly has never worked in finance or a global corporation. silly generalizations of quants aren't accurate.

i'll stop bc i don't want to be mean, but this is such a silly book
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