Buy used:
$5.98
& FREE Shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Go green, recycle! Book has wear from reading, may contain some library markings.
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Follow the Author

Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


Inside the National Security Council: The True Story of the Making and Unmaking of Reagan's Foreign Policy Hardcover – September 1, 1988


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
$5.98
$4.37

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Book recommendations, author interviews, editors' picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
    Apple
  • Android
    Android
  • Windows Phone
    Windows Phone
  • Click here to download from Amazon appstore
    Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

kcpAppSendButton

Special offers and product promotions

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The author served as special assistant to the president for national security affairs from 1983 to 1986. In this insider's account, he contends that Robert McFarlane and John Poindexter sought to circumvent the decision-making process of the National Security Council without President Reagan's knowledge. Resisting this, Menges made himself decidedly unpopular with both men. "You are making too much trouble for us," Poindexter shouted at him; McFarlane called his objections "subversive." Menges was equally disturbed by the State Department's attempts to replace Reagan-appointed ambassadors to Latin America with career foreign service officers who supported State's position, as well as by its efforts to bring about a political settlement contrary to the president's goals in Nicaragua. His attempts to inform Reagan of what was going on were blocked, and Menges maintains that he was given a phony promotion to prevent him from interfering in the Iran-Contra affair. Menges is "virtually certain" the president was kept in the dark in regard to the diversion of funds to the Contras.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product details

Customer reviews

5 star (0%) 0%
4 star (0%) 0%
3 star (0%) 0%
2 star (0%) 0%
1 star (0%) 0%
How does Amazon calculate star ratings?

No customer reviews