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The Intention Economy: When Customers Take Charge by [Searls, Doc]
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Length: 320 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Named a Best Business Book for 2012 in strategy+business magazine

“a must-read book…” — TechCrunch

“Doc Searls has written a very thoughtful book on the intention economy and the promises it holds for both vendors and customers.” — Forbes

“Searls’s vision raises provocative questions for companies and for marketers.” — strategy+business magazine magazine

“This is a thoughtful, well researched book with a compelling thesis and call to action for marketers.” — Decision

“a brilliant piece on free markets and the Internet” — Linux Journal

“Do yourself a favor. Read The Intention Economy by @dsearls. It’s a very quick study in what VRM means for both brands and consumers.” — Business 2 Community (business2community.com)

“The fine distinction between consumer and customer is at the heart of this insightful look at how some companies, like Trader Joe's, are moving in the direction of the "intention economy," where the desires and needs of individual customers primarily determine what the vendors offer.” — Fort Worth Star Telegram

“it’s fun, insightful reading for anyone interested in becoming “self-actualized, liberated customers.” — SocialMedia.biz

“Finally a thoughtful, hype free book worth reading about digital marketing, the relationships we have with vendors, and a vision for a better future where we have greater control of our personal data.” — ZDNet

ADVANCE PRAISE for The Intention Economy:

JP Rangaswami, Chief Scientist, salesforce.com—
“‘Consumers have a right to exercise control over what personal data companies collect from them and how they use it.’ That’s the way the draft of the US Government’s planned Privacy Bill of Rights begins. If you want to understand what this really means, then Doc’s book is the place to start. In fact, if you want to understand anything about what’s really happening with customers, this book is for you. An excellent read.”

Seth Godin, author, We Are All Weird
“Profound, far-reaching, and one of those books people will be bragging about having read five or ten years from now.”

John Hagel, Co-Director, Center for the Edge; coauthor, The Power of Pull
“This book provides a much-needed road map for a profound shift in global markets. Vendor Relationship Management will turn markets as we know them inside out. Searls, as the key architect of this new movement, provides a compelling view of both why and how these changes will occur. You cannot afford to ignore this book."

Esther Dyson, angel investor—
“From Doc’s mouth to vendors’ ears! Doc Searls describes the economy the way it should be, with vendors paying attention to individuals’ wants and needs. I see a few such business models emerging, and I hope Searls’s book will incite a rush of them.”

Don Peppers and Martha Rogers, Ph.D., co-authors of Extreme Trust: Honesty as a Competitive Advantage
“Deliciously skeptical of today’s business models, Searls paints a compelling picture of the future. And if you’re a business manager, The Intention Economy is essential reading. Think of it as an API for dealing with empowered customers. ”

Clay Shirky, author, Here Comes Everybody and Cognitive Surplus
“No one has a better sense of the changing relationship between vendors and the rest of us than Doc Searls. In The Intention Economy, he explains the networked economy and your place in it, whoever you are—buyer, seller, advertiser, user.”

About the Author

Doc Searls is senior editor of Linux Journal, coauthor of The Cluetrain Manifesto, and one of the world’s most widely read bloggers. In The World is Flat, Thomas L. Friedman calls him “one of the most respected technology writers in America.” Searls is a fellow at the Center for Information Technology & Society (CITS) at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and an alumnus fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, where he continues to run ProjectVRM.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1761 KB
  • Print Length: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (April 10, 2012)
  • Publication Date: April 10, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007UPDH5S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #544,816 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Daniel N. Miller on April 20, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Customer Care is at a crossroads. Doc, in his highly conversational writing style, provides rapid-fire, highly personalized insights into both how things are and how they ought to be. For enterprise executives, he exposes many of the common promotional, marketing, sales and merchandising practices that help businesses achieve well-defined "KPIs (key performance indicators) like customer retention, increased marketshare, mindshare and, ultimately sales. At the same time he shows (just as he and the originators of the Cluetrain Manifesto did at the turn of the century) how these practices show disdain for customers and prospects and often make it impossible for them to recognize what their customers and prospects are trying to get across in real time.

As the originator of the "Vendor Relationship Management" (VRM) concept, Doc used his tenure at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, to foster several development initiatives designed to provide individuals with tools, resources, and fourth-party agents to help them ("us" actually) do a better job of acting on our own behalf while carrying out everyday commerce. In this book, he takes stock of many of those efforts and also gives credit to a handful of retailers, public broadcasters and other businesses who actively seek to serve their customers without gimmicks, deception of sleight of hand.

Doc recently pointed out that IT and CRM specialists think they are solving "the problems of the future" when they are, in fact, just stuck in the "now.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A must read book for anyone who is concerned about the arrogance of social media and its expropriation and sale of our personal information. Doc Searl's exhortations that the customer can and should be empowered, if heeded, will transform the internet into a vehicle for liberation and make it truly consumer centric. Hopefully, thinkers like Doc, will allow us to realize our personal and collective power and rights as consumers and true relationship to the web. His novel concept that, in the new economy, our personal data is currency that we own and control should strike fear into both Google and Facebook. Doc's arguments are compelling. By asserting our rights as customers, we can create vendor relationship that serve our interests rather than exploit and manipulate us for marketing purposes. The alternative is impoverishment and a disconcertingly bleak future. We cannot afford to ignore his message.

Dr. Milo Pulde
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
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Format: Hardcover
The Intention Economy
When Customers Take Charge
by Doc Searls
Review by Kelly Mackin, editor, Personal Data Journal.
Reprinted with Permission.

Before the middle of the last century, economics was called political economy. With the rise of computing and advanced statistical techniques after World War II, political economy gave way to econometrics and the rise of quantitative analysis. Political economy was always a broader, and in my opinion better, subject than its descendants for it allowed writers to connect economic thinking to the broader societies and issues that it directly affects.

Working on a four-year fellowship at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, Doc Searls, an award-winning writer and journalist, has been spearheading a deep and important project on the role of intention in the structure of human action. His project centers on the development of an intellectual and technology consensus to further an improved political economy of the web. The internet was created by engineers who cared more about creating things and worried less about making money. That's why they favored open systems over closed ones.

Searls points out that the "open" internet is now overshadowed by the web as a sort of a Blade Runner "shopping mall." Relationships in this commercial web are governed by an essentially feudalistic rubric where sellers - in their crush to maximize revenue streams - essentially control all the material terms of a relationship. This feudalistic model developed in the absence of a technical infrastructure that would support other models.

As in the case of proprietary email systems, the need exists to develop interaction methods that support a 1:1 correspondence between buyers and sellers.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I highly recommend pages 162 through the end, where the author lays out his proposals of what technology could enable an intention economy. People familiar with sensing, personalization, and privacy issues can safely skip the first 161 pages, which feel heavily padded. I recommend the author tighten up the first half of the book in a second edition - I almost gave up during the first half of the book, but I'm glad I stuck it out to the end.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Simply stated, when it comes to the value of *your* information, Doc Searls has been thinking longer, harder and further into the future than anyone.

He has been a tireless advocate for the notion that information about your life, your actions, and your preferences has value... and that you should both control that value and get a piece of it.

I've been lurking on his Project VRM list for a few years, and the ideas shared there have helped me understand issues that may seem a little abstract at first glance - some are revolutionary - but they may well drive the future of business and our society.

Don't even think of betting on Big Data, working in marketing, starting a business or investing in a company without reading this book.
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