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Introduction to the Practice of Statistics w/CD 6th Edition

3.7 out of 5 stars 59 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1429216210
ISBN-10: 1429216212
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

DAVID S. MOORE is Shanti S. Gupta Distinguished Professor of Statistics at Purdue University, USA, and was 1998 president of the American Statistical Association. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He has served as program director for statistics and probability at the National Science Foundation. He has also served as president of the International Association for Statistical Education and has received the Mathematical Association of America's national award for distinguished college or university teaching of mathematics. GEORGE P. McCABE is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Purdue University, USA. His entire professional career has been spent at Purdue, with sabbaticals at Princeton, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) in Melbourne, Australia, the University of Berne, Switzerland, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado, USA, and the National University of Ireland in Galway. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and was 1998 chair of its section on Statistical Consulting. He has served on the editorial boards of several statistics journals. He has consulted with many major corporations and has testified as an expert witness on the use of statistics in several legal cases. BRUCE CRAIG joins the author team for this new edition. He is the director of the statistical consulting center at Purdue University, USA (following George McCabe). This along with his strong academic research credentials and his many years of teaching statistics at all levels provide the academic experience and contemporary real data from the center's consulting that lecturers have grown to expect in this textbook. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 709 pages
  • Publisher: W. H. Freeman; 6th edition (December 25, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1429216212
  • ISBN-13: 978-1429216210
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 1.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #245,159 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I have used Moore & McCabe for years but am using this edition for the first time and have a number of complaints:
1) One fairly minor problem is that the new color scheme is downright painful. This is even worse on the slides (but at least they did away with the modern art at the beginning of each chapter).
2) Speaking of slides: the Power Point slides are completely overloaded; were they written by a statistician or by Tolstoy?
3) The problems are scattered throughout the chapters rather than collected at the end
4) The publisher has still not provided an electronic version of the solutions manual
5) A number of the online multiple choice questions in the compass system package are broken (missing plots, typographical errors, etc.)
6) The authors made some debateable decisions, such as introducing the concept of degrees of freedom in section 1.2. This will probably be the first day of class of what is the first statistics class most students ever take.
7) Most changes vis-a-vis the previous edition are superficial, e.g.: switching the order of two chapters (both on the CD, not the actual textbook)
7) All the flaws of the previous edition (see my review there) are still present.
8) New edition => no used books. This means more money for the authors, but a far greater financial burden for the students.
The previous edition of this textbook is not perfect (see my comments there) but superior to this edition.
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By PT on October 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is probably the worst text book I have ever used. Like the previous reviewers mentioned, there are very few "worked-out" problems. They give plenty of examples, but few solutions.

Also, the example problems in this book are complicated and involve large data sets. The book fails to transition smoothly from the conceptual to the practical. It unexpectedly jumps from the equations to multi-stage problems, and expects the reader to have a broad understanding of mathematical concepts prior to reading this supposed "introduction".

The homework section is beyond frustrating. About half the questions force the reader to flip throughout the book to look at charts, or even homework questions from the previous chapter. The information is difficult to access, and it creates a barrier to learning.

I would opt not to purchase this book if possible. Wikipedia does a much better job at presenting examples and explaining concepts.
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Format: Hardcover
Granted, I have a degree in math and was taking an intro to statistics course from the psychology department (ask my adviser about that one as it wasn't my choice). However, it was the first time I'd ever seen a statistics book that looked like a high school textbook. I think the text does a good job of discussing statistics in a way that won't put off a person who doesn't feel they're very strong in math - that is, they use a lot of descriptive text rather than a purely equation-driven presentation. They also discuss issues in statistical tests that you don't find in a math or engineering stats text, such as ways in which biases are introduced into "random" experiments, ethical issues the experimenter has to contend with, situations in which median might be a preferable measure of the middle, etc. The text is good for high school students or possibly undergraduates who have little to no previous experience with statistical concepts (i.e., it includes a detailed description of mean, median, and mode) and a hesitation to take math classes. I don't think it's appropriate for graduate level instruction regardless of the students' background.
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Format: Hardcover
My daughter's college stat class uses this book. Two weeks into the semester, I can say this is one of the worst math books I've ever seen. This has few worked examples. Homework problems make constant references to other areas of the book so there is a continuous back and forth. Questions are unclear. The authors assume a great deal of knowledge on the part of students - one has to wonder how many years (decades?) it's been since they were in an introductory classroom. Data sets are unnecessarily large - one problem has 76 data points to be manipulated without software. The same concepts could be taught with half as many. Even the layout is poor - small type face on homework problems which are crowded together.
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Format: Hardcover
For an into to stats, the authors seem to be going faster than what we understand. Even our professor agrees that this book is not useful and recommends Google instead. As we got into chapter 7, there are more and more practice problems that don't even include all the information needed to work the problem! Its nice that all the formulas are in the book, but it would be great also if it showed us how to use the graphing calculator. I've never really taken the time to write a review, but after spending countless hours actually looking up the correct info on the web instead of trying to figure out what the author is trying to say, I felt compelled to write an honest review. Our professor is still trying to get this book pulled. Now I see why.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This textbook is terrible, but if you're buying this book it's probably because you don't have a choice. I had to use it for my Stats class where my teacher didn't speak English very well so I was mostly relying on the textbook. It is impossible to just learn from this book. It does not explain anything. It shows you all these ways of finding some number to describe some set of data (although it doesn't even do that very well!) but it doesn't tell you why it is useful or what it tells you about the data. One cannot learn statistics from this book. All it's good for is problems.
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