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Comment: This item is in good condition. All pages and covers are readable. There are no stains or tears. Dust jacket is present if applicable. May contain small amounts of writing and/or highlighting. Spine and cover may show signs of wear. May not contain supplementary items. We ship within 1 business day. Big Hearted Books shares its profits with schools, churches and non-profit groups throughout New England. Thank you for your support!
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The Invisibles Vol. 2: Apocalipstick Paperback – April 1, 2001

4.3 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
Book 2 of 7 in the Invisibles Series

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

The Invisibles, Grant Morrison's brilliant series of magickal underground tales, exposes the naked spirituality of good and evil through gut-wrenching, psychedelic violence. Apocalipstick, the collected issues from midway through volume 1, tracks the career of new kid Jack Frost after he runs away from his wary pals in the Invisibles to come to terms with his power and his adulthood. Along the way we see humans hunted for sport, interdimensional monsters that would make H.P. Lovecraft puke, and a leisurely look at Lord Fanny's childhood. The penciling, always appropriate to Morrison's moods, ranges from brutal scratchings to startling clear drawings. While it's probably true that comics, like literature generally, can't be truly subversive any more, Apocalipstick shows how it could be done. --Rob Lightner

About the Author

Grant Morrison has authored too many bestselling graphic novels to count. Batman: Arkham Asylum, Doom Patrol, Animal Farm, Flex Mentallo and the Invisibles are just a few of the books with which Morrison has established himself as one of the modern masters of the medium.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (April 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563897024
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563897023
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.5 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #379,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Lukas Jackson on June 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
A few years ago I read a bunch of Invisibles books, but somehow always missed this one. I might have stayed away because of the femme cover/title, and the inside art is all over the place quality-wise.

I'm wishing that I had picked it up sooner, though, because the storylines here are among the best in the series, and maybe in comicdom. One story I loved: yuppies at a pharmaceutical company distribute a crack that kills the bodies of users and leaves them as empty vessels for the yuppies to "joy ride." Another: the back story of Lord Fanny and her psychosexual "spirit quest" to become a transsexual witch.

For those who haven't been exposed to The Invisibles, you need to check this series out. I find it more twisted, more compelling, and more fringe than any of the other series I've read, including Transmetropolitan and Preacher. In fact, this is light-years beyond anything published in drab-text "Literature."
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Format: Paperback
Book 2 of the Invisibles picks right up from Book 1's cliffhanger ending: Dane, one of his fingers chopped off by the sadistic (and demonic) Orlando, has taken flight, and the Invisibles have to find him. Unfortunately, heavily-armed "Myrmidons" have surrounded them, and what follows is the first all-out action scene since the very beginning of Book 1.

After this, things slow down a little, as creator/writer Grant Morrison "opens up" the world of the Invisibles. Even though we still don't know much about our main characters (King Mob, Boy, Ragged Robin, Lord Fanny), Morrison introduces new people to the fold, and we see how the exploits of the Invisibles affect the rest of the world.

First we are introduced to one of the more monstrous creatures ever witnessed in mass media entertainment, something that just might be the next king of England. Then we meet Jim Crow, an Invisible witch doctor who's both a world-famous rapper and a host for sacrifice-hungry voodoo spirits. And finally we are given one of the best single-issue stories in the series, "Best Man Fall," which, despite its seeming insignificance to the larger story, possesses more heart and emotion than any other in the series' history. A nonlinear narrative, this story shows how the "other side" works, and for once we see how our "heroes" (King Mob in particular) could just as easily be seen as "the bad guys." This is a great story, and worth the price of Book 2 alone.

The book closes out with a story arc that revolves around transvestite shaman Lord Fanny, in which we see his/her initiation as a young boy into the world of the supernatural.
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Format: Paperback
Apocalipstick, oh so cleverly named, is the second book of Grant Morrison's Invisibles series. After the drearily necessary Acadia story arc, these short stories are really what this series needed.
There are some real great single issues, particularly the Best Man's Fall, a story told through the eyes of a military peon.
The main arc, Apocalipstick, centers on Lord Fanny, the transvestite member of the Invisibles. I have to say, this is great stuff, all of the craziness seems rooted in reality, and makes the comic much more human and reasonable.
Morrison's characters are fleshed out in these stories, and these stories show a real desire on his part to get on track and tell some great stories. One of Morrison's weaknesses is to get too lost in the details, but that doesn't happen here.
A real enjoyable read, highly recommended.
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I'm a huge grant Morrison fan and I think this is his best work. this volume is great but you really have to read the series as a whole to understand any of it, and maybe read it a couple times over to really understand it.(trust me, if you read it once you will want to read it again) If your looking for a series for your kid you may want to hold off on this until they are at least 14. it's pretty adult themed (sex drugs and violence) and I don't think a young kid would like it much anyway.

However if your looking for a graphic novel that makes you think about the world around you, sucks you in to it's reality and makes you question your reality this is the one for you. but like i said, to truly understand it start with volume one.

this series is the pinnacle of Grant Morrisons' psychedelic phase before he was big in DC so if you've been reading his more recent stuff don't expect super hero antics. It's not as disturbing as the Filth but it has it's moments so if you can't stomach a little violence and some hard hitting social commentary it's not for you. With that said I think this is a must have for any serious adult graphic novel fans collection.
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Format: Paperback
I didn't find this book to be as mind-blowingly delightful as "Say You Want a Revolution," but it's still darned good reading -- plenty of madcap ideas from the mind of Grant Morrison. (If you haven't read "Revolution," you really should before you read this book, since "Apocalipstick" is the second collection of the first volume of the comic series.) There are a couple of standalone stories that do a great job to set up the larger world in which the main characters operate. They may seem like interludes or digressions, but they're really the heart and soul of this book. The longer arc that returns to the main plot -- inasmuch as The Invisibles can be said to have a main plot -- is good, but I think it suffers in comparison to the 'Arcadia' arc from "Revolution." It does do a good job of exploring the background of one of the main characters, though. The book also has a lot of different artists, and as a result it shifts in tone and style a number of times. More consistency might have been a benefit, but it does increase the chance you'll find something you like.
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