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Irrational Exuberance: (Second Edition) by [Shiller, Robert J.]

Irrational Exuberance: (Second Edition) Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 228 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Sequels often disappoint when compared to their predecessors, but author Robert Shiller has proved the exception to the rule with his second edition of Irrational Exuberance. When the original book released in 2000, Shiller's prescient analysis of bubble-like market behavior provided perspective on the painful meltdown of stock-price valuations that subsequently occurred. Five years later, the Yale professor's bearish predictions about real-estate valuations are enough to give any savvy investor or homebuyer pause.

Shiller is one of several well-known economists and pundits who've begun a running dialogue in the last few years around the drawbacks of unchecked free markets. Few writers, though, dissect the phenomenon of bubble behavior as clearly and thoroughly as Shiller does. As with the first edition of his book, Shiller begins this one with reams of quantitative data around the late 1990s stock-market runup. This new edition adds data on real-estate price trends in the early 2000s, and points out the striking parallels between the earlier stock-market boom and bust, and current trends with housing prices in the United States. Shiller actually believes the two phenomena are related; as investors lost confidence in the stock market and moved their money into real estate, one asset class fell while the other rose. According to Shiller's analysis, the pattern is destined to repeat itself.

Aside from the initial data, the real strength of Irrational Exuberance is the straightforward, almost clinical way in which it explains why things happen as they do. The book walks readers through structural reasons for market bubbles, then ventures into "softer" analyses which professional economists less confident than Shiller would be scared to touch. It examines cultural factors behind market bubbles, such as hype-mongering news media, and psychological factors, such as herd behavior.

Another improvement in this latest edition of Shiller's book is his inclusion of more personal commentary, and he mentions the influence that his wife, herself a clinical psychologist, has had on his intellectual development and his view of psychological impacts on economic behavior. Other personal insights from Shiller center on experiences he had while touring and lecturing around the first book, and some of the most interesting passages are those in which he describes common questions or feedback from his audience, and what he thought in reaction--but didn't voice while on his tour.

In the end, Shiller closes his book with an intriguing set of policy proposals. He argues for a revamping of the U.S. social security system, a new system of house-price insurance for homeowners, and risk reduction through portfolio diversification. Fans of the brainy academic will note with approval that Shiller practices what he preaches: he has begun trying to implement some of his ideas in the real world through two private consulting firms he has founded, Macro Securities Research and Macro Financial. The hope is if Shiller's as correct with this second book as he was with his first, readers will all learn something from these new companies. --Peter Han

Review

Robert J. Shiller, Co-Winner of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Economics

Winner of the 2000 Commonfund Prize for the Best Contribution to Endowment Management Research

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Robert J. Shiller . . . has done more than any other economist of his generation to document the less rational aspects of financial markets."---Paul Krugman, New York Times

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Irrational Exuberance is not just a prophecy of doom. . . . [I]t is a serious attempt to explain how speculative bubbles come about and how they sustain themselves."---John Cassidy, New Yorker

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Informative and well-argued . . . A calm and reasonable antidote to today's euphoria."---Jeff Madrick, New York Review of Books

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "What set off this speculation and what feeds it? Shiller ranges widely his explanations, laying them out in the first 168 pages in easy-to-read, sometimes passionate prose. . . . [T]hose first 168 pages are must reading for anyone with savings invested in stocks."---Louis Uchitelle, New York Times Book Review

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Mr. Shiller's book offers a dose of realism. . . . [I]t presents a message investors would be wise to head: Make sure your portfolio is adequately diversified. Save more and don't count on double-digit gains of the past decades continuing to bail you out during retirement."---Burton G. Malkiel, Wall Street Journal

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Although its message may be unwelcome to many, this important book should be read by anyone interested in economics or the stock markets."---Rene M. Stulz, Science

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Dazzling, richly textured, provocative . . By far the most important book about the stock market since Jeremy J. Siegel's Stocks for the Long Run."---William Wolman, Business Week

From review of Princeton's previous edition: "Shiller has provided an accessible guide to the usually impenetrable literature on financial markets, especially the American stock market." (Foreign Affairs)

Product details

  • File Size: 1814 KB
  • Print Length: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; 2 edition (February 9, 2009)
  • Publication Date: February 9, 2009
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005CQAJ80
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #740,020 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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