Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Trade in your item
Get a $1.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Irresistible History of Southern Food: Four Centuries of Black-Eyed Peas, Collard Greens & Whole Hog Barbecue (American Palate) Hardcover – May 14, 2011

4.5 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.40 $10.23

Smokin' Hot in the South: New Grilling Recipes from the Winningest Woman in Barbecue (Melissa Cookston) by Melissa Cookston
"Smokin' Hot in the South" by Melissa Cookston
Explore how to use fire to craft more than 85 Southern-influenced recipes enhanced with the cultural flavors of Mexico, France, and Asia. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The South has always been celebrated for its food--a delectable blend of ingredients and cooking techniques connected to the region's rich soil and bountiful waters. And oftentimes what makes a recipe Southern is as much a state of mind as it is a matter of geography--Southerners simply decide a particular food is Southern, and that s that. From the earliest days of settlement, when colonists struggled to survive on a diet of dogs, cats, rats and poisonous snakes, to an era defined by sumptuous dining that blended European, Native American and African cuisines, Southern food truly stems from a unique tradition. Respected Southern food historian and chef Rick McDaniel explores the history of over 150 recipes, from Maryland stuffed ham to South Carolina chicken bog to New Orleans shrimp Creole, without forgetting the meal's crowning glory: dessert.

About the Author

Rick McDaniel is a food historian, culinary anthropologist and author who specializes in the food of the American South with a particular interest in the Federal and Antebellum periods. He is the author of An Irresistible History of Southern Food (History Press, 2011).  
The New York Times, MSNBC and newspapers and magazines throughout the South have interviewed McDaniel about Southern food history and traditional recipes. He has been a consultant to the producers of Diners, Drive-ins and Dives on the Food Network and Anthony Bourdain's No Reservations on the Travel Channel, as well as a Southern Regional panelist for the James Beard Foundation's chef and restaurant awards. His website, chefrick.com, has been featured in the New York Times and was selected as one of the best Internet resources on American cookery by the University of Oregon and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. 
His first book, An Irresistible History of Southern Food is in the reference collections of Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, The University of Chicago and Harvard University.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: American Palate
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Arcadia Publishing (May 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1609491939
  • ISBN-13: 978-1609491932
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,437,020 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I LOVED this book. It's well written, well researched, and really funnny at times. I loved that Chef Rick to old recipes from receipt books and translated them for the modern cook-and WOAH they are good. A really fun read and makes a great gift.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was raised in the deep South. This is one of the best cookbooks on Southern Cooking. I love this book and I know real, true Southern Cooking. This is great and the history of the food is very interesting. I want to send this to some of my "Yankee Friends", so they can learn how to cook Southern style. Thank you Mr. Rick McDaniel for all of your hard work, it shows in your book.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is another FUN COOK TO READ AND USE THE RECIPES. I GAVE IT 4 STARTS BECAUSE THE AUTHOR OF THE BOOK DID NOT PUT IN A SOUTHERN FAVORITE DISH THAT IS COOKED IN EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA, CHICKEN PASTRY OR as it is called in
WESTERN NORTH CAOLINA CHICKEN AND DUMPLINS. When you make Chicken Pastry, you boil the HEN, or Fryer with lots of onions, celery, and add CHICKEN BASE [ANNE'S CHICKEN BASE MADE IN AYDEN, N.C.] TO GIVE MORE FAVLORE. YOU TAKE OUT THE HEN AFTER IT HAS BEEN COOKED OR FALLING OFF THE BONE. DRAIN THE BROTH BEFORE YOU MAKE THE PASTRY. TO MAKE THE PASTRY: MIX UP PLAN FLOUR, SALT, BAKING POWDER, WITH EITHER
1/2 CUP MILK AND 1/2 CUP BROTH, OR 1 CUP BROTH. MADE A DOUGH, THEN ROLL OUT THE DOUGH UNTIL VERY THIN CUT INTO STRIPS OR SQUARES AND PUT THE DOUGH INTO SLOWELY BOILING BROTH, LET THAT COOK ABOUT 5 MINUTES, THEN PUSH IT DOWN AND ADD THE NEXT ROW OF DOUGH. While the dough is cooking, CUT THE MEAT OFF THE CHICKEN , after you have cooked all the dough, put the CHICKEN en back into the pot and cook a few minutes more. You can add a can or a box or 1/2 box of frozen baby green peas,. In addition, you can add carrots cut up two or three inch pieces before you take out the chicken.

OR YOU CAN PURCASE A BOX OF ANNE'S DUMPLINES OR ANY OTHER BRAND OF FROZEN DOUGHT THAT HAS BEEN PREPARED SO ALL YOU DO IS PLACE THE PASTRY DOUGH INTO THE POT AS DIRECTORED. COOK THE PASTRY LONGER THAN THE PACKAGES TELLS YOU.

I DID NOT GO BACK AND READ THIS SO IF THERE ARE IN ERRORS, SO BE IT.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book is half cookbook, half history and half novel but it adds up to one fascinating read. I read it like a novel before bed and then tried the recipes the next day! I was surprised to find myself quoting facts and phrases from a 'cookbook'. As a transplanted Yankee, my appreciation for Southern food, and Southern history, was awakened and so were my tatsebuds. I was also able to make healthier versions of the recipes but my truly southern friends can always tell the difference!

Written by Coco (John's wife)
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Enjoyed the book. However, while the book acknowledges the profound contribution of African-Americans to Southern Foods. the author thinks gumbo could have originated from bouillabaisse. Got there because he focused on the roux and the Arcadians and not on the African name of the dish (book recognizes that the name is derived from the name for Okra in one African dialect but ignores this) or the configuration of the dish ( I visited Senegal some years ago and had an okra and seafood stew similar to Louisiana Gumbo called soupoukandia). As the book references culinary history, it could have benefited from a deeper look into the African impact on Southern foods. Clearly, Louisiana Gumbo is influenced by the many cultures in Louisiana.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse