Kindle Price: $10.88

Save $5.11 (32%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel (P.S.) by [Allende, Isabel]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel (P.S.) Kindle Edition

4.1 out of 5 stars 1,149 customer reviews

See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$10.88

Length: 468 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $12.99 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready
Matchbook Price: $2.99 What's this?
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.

Featured Picks in Historical Fiction
The Invitation
The Invitation
The Invitation
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

[Signature]Reviewed by Marlon JamesOf the many pitfalls lurking for the historical novel, the most dangerous is history itself. The best writers either warp it for selfish purposes (Gore Vidal), dig for the untold, interior history (Toni Morrison), or both (Jeannette Winterson). Allende, four years after Ines of My Soul, returns with another historical novel, one that soaks up so much past life that there is nowhere left to go but where countless have been. Opening in Saint Domingue a few years before the Haitian revolution would tear it apart, the story has at its center Zarité, a mulatto whose extraordinary life takes her from that blood-soaked island to dangerous and freewheeling New Orleans; from rural slave life to urban Creole life and a different kind of cruelty and adventure. Yet even in the new city, Zarité can't quite free herself from the island, and the people alive and dead that have followed her.Zarité's passages are striking. More than merely lyrical, they map around rhythms and spirits, making her as much conduit as storyteller. One wishes there was more of her because, unlike Allende, Zarité is under no mission to show us how much she knows. Every instance, a brush with a faith healer, for example, is an opportunity for Allende to showcase what she has learned about voodoo, medicine, European and Caribbean history, Napoleon, the Jamaican slave Boukman, and the legendary Mackandal, a runaway slave and master of black magic who has appeared in several novels including Alejo Carpentier's Kingdom of This World. The effect of such display of research is a novel that is as inert as a history textbook, much like, oddly enough John Updike's Terrorist, a novel that revealed an author who studied a voluminous amount of facts without learning a single truth.Slavery as a subject in fiction is still a high-wire act, but one expects more from Allende. Too often she forgoes the restraint and empathy essential for such a topic and plunges into a heavy breathing prose reminiscent of the Falconhurst novels of the 1970s, but without the guilty pleasure of sexual taboo. Sex, overwritten and undercooked, is where opulent hips slithered like a knowing snake until she impaled herself upon his rock-hard member with a deep sigh of joy. Even the references to African spirituality seem skin-deep and perfunctory, revealing yet another writer too entranced by the myth of black cultural primitivism to see the brainpower behind it. With Ines of My Soul one had the sense that the author was trying to structure a story around facts, dates, incidents, and real people. Here it is the reverse, resulting in a book one second-guesses at every turn. Of course there will be a forbidden love. Betrayal. Incest. Heartbreak. Insanity. Violence. And in the end the island in the novel's title remains legend. Fittingly so, because to reach the Island Beneath the Sea, one would have had to dive deep. Allende barely skims the surface.Marlon James's recent novel, The Book of Night Women was a finalist for the 2010 National Book Critics Circle Award.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Readers and critics often revere the Chilean-born Allende for her grand, sweeping, magical realism novels, but many reviewers expressed some disappointment with this latest offering. The Miami Herald critic noted: "The prose is too often the mating of a celeb magazine and a master's thesis," and several agreed the book felt overwritten. Others were unimpressed by the characters' lack of complexity and believability. On a positive note, many critics enjoyed the storytelling, with women at the forefront, and others praised the novel's respectful portrayal of voodoo practices. For those hoping to learn more about Haiti's slave rebellion, however, it might be best to seek out Madison Smartt Bell's acclaimed fictional trilogy: All Soul's Rising, Master of the Crossroads, and The Stone that the Builder Refused (**** Mar/Apr 2005).

Product Details

  • File Size: 1589 KB
  • Print Length: 468 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books; Reprint edition (April 10, 2010)
  • Publication Date: April 27, 2010
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003GFIW3S
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,985 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am originally from Haiti, and is currently reading this book on my Kindle. I absolutely love it. It's obvious the author did hours of research on the history of Haiti, and it's then relationship with France. The accuracy of the cruelty of slavery, including the treatment of Mulattos towards the blacks. The intertwining of Christianity, versus the need of the Africans to hold onto the practice of Voodoo. After all, what appeared as the "white's" religion, was used to justify their oppresion. It is a very informative read. I highly recommend it.
3 Comments 186 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Isabel Allende is a great writer. A serious writer. A very profound and emotional writer. She hails from Chile, where her father, renowned and devoted activist Salvador Allende, tried to change the world but ended up losing his life instead. She is fascinated with the ideas of war and virtue, about dedication to one's country and the need to change it, to love in all its splendor and the raucous power of emotion gone wrong. Although she doesn't use much in the way of magic in her work, her books reflect a certain belief in the universe as a spirit with power that manipulates and frustrates the human puppets it places on earth.

In ISLAND BENEATH THE SEA, Allende looks at two people: a slave who grows into her own with a talent in voodoo, and Toulouse Valmorain, a young man who is trying to fit into society's predetermined characteristics of a successful young man. Both of their travails are difficult, and they find themselves drawn to and dependent upon each other for their survival in some very rough waters. The island of the title is Saint-Domingue, and Zarité --- known as Tété --- is "the daughter of an African mother she never knew and one of the white sailors who brought her into bondage." Tété finds solace from the daily horrors and fears of her childhood in the traditional rhythms of African drums as well as the voodoo loas she comes to be educated in by her fellow slaves.

Twenty-year-old Toulouse Valmorain comes to Saint-Dominigue in 1770. It's as if he's a contemporary financier who is coming to Manhattan to become a billionaire. With a bevy of powdered wigs in his baggage, he comes to run his father's plantation, Saint Lazare. The work is hard, more difficult than he could have been prepared to expect.
Read more ›
13 Comments 104 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I have been a fan of Ms. Allende's books for some time and this one does not disappoint. The first reviewer made a point that the book casts the stereotype that all Whites are evil. I do not believe that is the writer's intent. There were atrocities that were commited by the Blacks as well. What I see is the book showing the destructive cycle to so much and so many that slavery causes. Haiti has never recovered from what took place in that country 200 years ago and the earthquake has set it back many, many more years. I applaud the effort in the research that Ms. Allende took the time to make in order to incorporate the history and fictional characters in this book. It made me want to do my own "homework" to find out about the Haitian Revolt and the people who were responsible for initiating the abolishmnent of slavery. Tete and her family's fortunes and tragedies are very real ones. All the horrors she documents are very much connected to forceably keeping people in bondage.

This book was so beautifully written. Kudos to Isabel. Her books are well worth the effort that she puts into them.
1 Comment 74 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The wacky and wonderful Carl Hiaasen returns to his Florida stomping grounds for his latest comic caper "Star Island." Loading the novel and his characters with the over-the-top eccentricities you might expect from such a warped mind (no offense Carl--you're my kind of guy)--Hiaasen uses his signature style to brutally satirize the notion of celebrity in an era of sleazy tabloid journalism. It's an easy target--to be sure--maybe too easy and familiar. But Hiaasen can spin a tale and "Star Island" is a repugnantly entertaining romp even if you wish Hiaasen would have set his sights a bit higher!

Cherry Pye epitomizes everything that is disturbing about modern celebrity. With a lack of talent, but backed by an ambitious team, Cherry has risen to teenage stardom despite an obliviousness to her surroundings. Keeping Cherry's image somewhat intact amidst rampant promiscuity and drug use is a full time job for an entire entourage of handlers. With self-promoting parents, a pair of publicists surgically enhanced to appear identical, a desperate record label executive, a wannabe boyfriend, a stand-in to handle social events when Cherry is incapacitated, and a new body guard with a weed whacker in place of an arm--Hiaasen has compiled enough hilariously repellant characters to fill several novels! Add a corpulent paparazzo who's practically stalking Cherry to her death and an ex-politician who has turned into a rogue environmental terrorist and "Star Island" is overflowing with local color!

I think the primary criticism that some readers might have with "Star Island" is its lack of a real heart--none of the characters proves to be an identifiable protagonist.
Read more ›
2 Comments 141 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel (P.S.)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel (P.S.)