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It's me, Eddie: A fictional memoir Hardcover – 1983

5.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Text: English, Russian (translation)
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394530640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394530642
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,529,702 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By John J. Christy on January 16, 2012
Format: Paperback
One of the best books of the 20th century. Limonov stirs up a poet's rage against everything that is anti-human, everything that is repressive and stifling . . . His solution - tear it all down. Eddie-Baby leaves the USSR for America with promises of riches, women, drugs, and artistic liberty. He finds abject poverty, his wife leaves him, wine and vodka still suffice, and unique voices are marginalized as much in America as they are in Russia; in short, nothing changes. Passion and love are juxtaposed with the rote boredom of work and urban life. Along the way, Limonov takes aim at political activists, Russians, Americans, men, women, and especially our predilection to surrender to life. He rarely misses his mark . . . The sentiment is close to that one found in the romantics, especially the 19th century rebellion against urbanity and the industrial mode of life.

There's a short section early in the book where Limonov accuses his reader of being a slave to work, of having a petty bourgeois mentality, and a pathetic soul. This is capped off by the admonition, "You're ****!" [apologize for amazon's filter] It's hard to disagree, put in those terms. With Eddie as my accuser, I'd confess to anything . . .

Ignore the reviewers who are shocked by Limonov's provocations. What is shocking is not sleeping with a black man on the street, but living a beige life in the face of so much possibility.

For those interested, Limonov's politics also show an early alignment with national bolshevism and a repudiation of anglo liberalism. We see somewhat weaker critiques of the early Bolsheviks, and especially a condemnation of the post-Khrushchev Russian bureaucratic state.

Limonov's prose has a tendency to reach hysterical levels of emotion; whether this is a good or bad mark will probably depend on the reader.
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By A Customer on August 13, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The style is splendid, the execution dashing. This is Tropic Of Cancer written with more talent and professionalism. The book is tight, witty, full of hilarious observations. Unfortunately, it may not go down well with many American readers for a number of reasons (and this is very, very sad): The author uses a very European approach, part-Russian, part-French, in his narration. He is not exactly bashing New York or America, he is merely observing and telling the story, but his arrows might seem too vicious at times (although there is plenty of poetic praise and romantic awe as well). This is hard to explain. A whole bunch of American writers in this century were much angrier. I don't know... The book is enjoyable throughout. I haven't the faintest idea why it hasn't been more popular.
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Format: Hardcover
With the welfare checks, slumy apartment, and homosexual encounters in the alleys, Edward seems to be living a fairly dismal existence. His life was sh*t and he knew it. Once a famous poet and writer in Russia, he was now ignored as a human being in the United States. This book is a good insight into the mind of a self-exiled emigrant, the desperatation and self-loathing he faces as he tries to grab hold in this world. Edward is still reeling from the loss of his past "productive" life in Russia. He is looking for someone to love, someone to take care of him; he is all alone in the world. We have all felt like this, like an exile, at one point or another. Limonov's ability to sway our emotions is what allows us to love Edward, despite all of his debaucheries.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a classic. Great book, great price. Please shop the price, as I saw an incredible range in price depending upon publisher and seller.

This piece is not for everyone. A lot of profanity, and I must admit to skipping at least one or two pages, as they were a bit to much. Overall, a great read for those who would like to see the world through the eyes of another. The tale is told from one perspective, and an not meant to be a historical account, but is an spot on accurate emotional/psychological account of events. Captivating, brilliant, but quite dark and quite genuine. Hats off to Lemonov...
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Format: Paperback
Edward Limonow has been called enfant terrible of Russian literature. He very well may be just that. His prose and poetry have made him a celebrity anti-hero among the Soviet exiles during the Cold War. This writer does not take prisoners. He is not trying to please the reader either. He is frank, he tells it "like it is."
The acid style is not for the weak of heart, but still worth reading.
A must for everyone who wants to study the immigrant experience in America.
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