Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.30
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

J2EE(tm) Technology in Practice: Building Business Applications with the Java(tm) 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition Paperback – June 4, 2001

3.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$1.00 $0.01

Excel2016ForDummiesVideo
Excel 2016 For Dummies Video Training
Discover what Excel can do for you with self-paced video lessons from For Dummies. Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Since its introduction, The Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) has achieved remarkable success among application server providers and their customers. More than a dozen leading application server companies have announced J2EE compatible products, and over one million developers have downloaded the J2EE SDK from Sun's J2EE Web site (http://java.sun.com/j2ee).

Today, numerous enterprises face the challenge of developing distributed applications. IT professionals deal with a variety of issues: connecting dispersed users with centralized applications, building applications quickly and efficiently, and connecting heterogeneous clients and servers.

J2EE in Practice provides ten examples of ways that J2EE technology has helped leading corporations, educational institutions, and government organizations face these challenges and reap significant rewards. Chapters in this book explore how:

  • JCrew enhanced its traditional catalog sales operation using J2EE technology from Art Technology Group (ATG).
  • One of the country's largest mortgage companies, HomeSide Lending, produced innovative online lending services using the BEA WebLogic server.
  • The Borland Application Server enabled AT&T Unisource to respond quickly to demand in long-distance voice traffic routing.
  • Codexa Corporation used Brokat's GemStone/J platform to deliver information for widely dispersed financial services professionals.
  • eTapestry.com delivers applications to assist nonprofits in their fundraising using GemStone/J and Sun Microsystem's Forte for Java development environment.
  • Altura International used the HP BlueStone J2EE platform to implement the Web's first online catalog shopping portal, catalogcity.com.
  • IBM customers Honeywell and Bekins use Java technology to improve processes on the manufacturing floor and in the warehousing and delivery of large consumer products.
  • International Data Post (IDP), a service owned by seven European postal operators, brought snail mail to the Internet age using iPlanet's J2EE technology.
  • Physics research institute CERN worked with Oracle to provide electronic document handling services to over 5000 users worldwide.
  • J2EE technology helps the US Military Traffic Management Command, Freight Systems Office (FSO) manage and control costs of small package shipping.


0201746220B01172002

About the Author

Dr. R. G. G. "Rick" Cattell is a distinguished engineer in Java platform software at Sun Microsystems, and a founding member of the Java Platform Group that produced J2EE. He has worked for 17 years at Sun Microsystems in senior roles, and for 10 years before that in research at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) and Carnegie-Mellon University. The author of more than 50 technical papers and five books, Cattell has worked with object technology and database systems since 1980. He is co-creator of JDBC, and was responsible for forming Sun's Database Engineering Group, whose performance tuning helped to make Sun a leading database server provider. He led the Cypress database management system effort at Xerox PARC, was a founder of SQL Access, and was founder and chair of the Object Database Management Group (ODMG). He authored the world's first monograph on object data management, and has received the Association for Computing Machinery Outstanding Dissertation Award.



0201746220AB07292002
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Java (Addison-Wesley)
  • Paperback: 309 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson Education; 1st edition (June 4, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201746220
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201746228
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,016,000 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Had some nuggets of interest to an architect/developer, but mostly had a manager's perspective. Lots of repetition, lots of java-sell, and not enough quality content to merit a hearty recommendation...
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Beg my pardon, I could not recommend this book for technical managers, software and system engineers or architects. For me it seems that several (not all) stories are written by marketing department... Happy people telling us: "project finished in 2 months". 2 months?.. please a project manager speaks about man/days or man/months.. No indication about implementation costs... No real architect description.. a few computers... Sun,Hp..... (my major point) No real PRO and CONTRA, or ENCOUNTERED PROBLEMS and SOLUTIONS... The books seems to be a J2EE glorification without speaking about J2EE (except introduction)
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This well-edited collection of ten case studies details the state of J2EE practice circa early 2001. Making its debut at Sun's JavaOne conference in June, the book candidly documents the experience of Sun's enterprise partners building server-side Java applications. From the mostly success stories two facts emerge: J2EE is component-based software development done right, but most projects are still using JSP/Servlet technology, with EJBs on the planning horizon. Also important is the continuing emphasis on scalability and performance, ever the bugaboos of virtual machine platforms like Java. Readers embarked on their own J2EE initiatives will appreciate the book's coverage of challenges creatively faced.
The introductory chapters by Dr. Rick Cattell and Jim Inscore of Sun Microsystems go beyond prefatory fluff, providing one of the better overviews of J2EE's goals and architecture. Developers and their managers will benefit from a close reading of Sun's strategy for distributed computing.
All in all, "J2EE Technology in Practice" is an exciting snapshot of a successful movement that promises the best is yet to come.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Cattell and Inscore do a very nice job laying out and illustating what J2EE server technology is all about, but more importantly they focus on "Real World" implementations of the J2EE compliant products.
The book focuses on leaders in the field and award winning J2EE implementations. Each chapter focuses on a particular J2EE application server and implementation. It is a Who's Who of J2EE application servers and companies leading the way in the Java application programming revolution.
I was inspired and enjoyed reading each unique chapter.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I'm not surprised that there have been a wide range of ratings for this book, becuase this nature of this book is not suited for everyone. It is not going to teach you J2EE development, and it is not going to help you figure out exactly how you should approach a J2EE development project. What it does do very well is to give a small sampling of how J2EE is successfully being used in very diverse industries. Since these are only a handful of case studies, this book really only provides anecodtal stories of success, rather than scientific proof. But, I found these anecodtal stories to be a fascinating quick read in order to gather more information on how different companies have been approaching enterprise development with J2EE. Some reviewers criticized the blatant product marketting in the book, but since the products being marketted are a wide variety of competing J2EE servers, I found that quite interesting.
The reason I give this book a 5 star rating is because I think that for the kind of book it is trying to be, it does a very good job. If you already have a good knowledge of J2EE technologies, and would like to know a bit more about how other companies are utilizing J2EE technologies, I recommend picking this book up and giving it a quick read by skimming past the parts that aren't as applicable to you.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse