Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$6.66
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: It has crisp pages, a tight binding. The Dust Jacket has minor wear, but otherwise the book is excellent--with no writing or highlighting at all. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to Thousands of happy customers. FAST SHIPPING! Ships direct from Amazon. Free shipping on orders over $35! And Free 2nd day shipping on orders over $49! Tracking number and Amazon customer service provided with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Japan in War and Peace: Selected Essays Hardcover – January, 1994

3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.00 $0.01
--This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition.

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Japan's racism, rooted in pride in the purity and homogeneity of its society, has remained constant from the feudal era to the present and is potentially dangerous to its relations with the rest of the world, according to Dower, who is Henry Luce professor of international cooperation and global stability at MIT. In this collection of powerful, evenhanded and crystalline essays, he tracks manifestations of racism in the nation's mythology, cinema, wartime behavior and adaptations to the postwar occupation. He analyzes the nature of Japanese capitalism, the nation's emergence as a world power, its politicians and its government. Dower examines the Japanese sense of superiority to the mongrelized U.S. population as a factor in trade problems, but he also argues that the U.S.'s own sense of superiority and enduring contempt for the "little yellow devils" still underly our fear and awe of the Japanese. He punctures manipulated postwar myths in both Japan and the U.S. of a frail, kindly Hirohito and reviews General Douglas MacArthur's dealings with him. Dower warns of new dangers: that Japan's extreme conservatives will continue to "sanitize the 'holy war' waged in the emperor's name," that they will remilitarize and that "the cult of Japanese uniqueness can stimulate highly irrational nationalistic emotions." Illustrations.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Historian Dower, whose classic study, War Without Mercy ( LJ 4/1/86), examined racial attitudes in the United States and Japan during World War II, here offers a collection of 11 essays on the wartime and postwar periods. Written over the past 15 years, the essays cover a wide range of subjects, from Japan's wartime cinema and atomic bomb research to the effects of the war and the U.S. occupation on Japanese postwar political and economic development. Of particular interest are several essays that utilize materials drawn from popular culture (films, cartoons, colloquial expressions, etc.) to examine racial attitudes and stereotypes in both societies, past and present. Altogether, this collection is useful in providing a solid cross-section of contemporary scholarship on Japan by one of the leading academics in the field as well as for the intrinsic interest of its subject matter. Recommended for informed general readers.
- Scott Wright, Univ. of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minn.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: New Pr; 1st edition (January 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565840674
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565840676
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,167,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I came to this book having already read John Dowers ground breaking and award winning Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Aftermath of World War II, a book that I enjoyed immensely, and I wasn't disappointed in this earlier collection of essays.

The essays are well written and though they cover a period in time from the Meiji era (1868) to the early 1990's most of them are anchored around the 1930's to the 1950's. Dower is eclectic in his choice of subjects, everything from wartime anti-regime graffiti as collated by the Japanese security services to reflections on prime minister Yoshida who oversaw the last years of the American occupation to the return of a good deal of sovereignty to the Japanese. This includes the friction between the Japanese and the U.S. over re-arming Japan, which the Japanese were not keen on and the U.S. (in the context of their Cold War aims) were. Interestingly these frictions surfaced well before the Korean War which I have heard cited as the reason for the turn around in U.S. policy vis-a-vis Japanese re-arming.

A number of myths are soundly scotched such as the Japanese propaganda assertion of the "hundred million hearts beating as one" which transferred to the U.S. as the assertion that the Japanese were all alike, robotic and unthinkingly servile. There is also an interesting comparative study of U.S. and Japanese wartime propaganda films, and another essay looks at the continuity and disruptions between wartime and post-war Japanese administrations and their economic policies.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
John Dower's Embracing Defeat is one of the best history books I've ever read. This earlier essay collection, which covers some of the same territory, is a disappointment by contrast. Dower is always an insightful guide to modern Japanese culture and politics. Among other things, he makes an interesting comparison here between U.S. and Japanese wartime cinema; offers a moving assessment of Japan's Atomic Bomb art; and inveighs repeatedly and passionately against what he fears is a resurgence of racism in America and ultra-nationalism in Japan. The book feels dated, though. Dower wrote most of these essays at a time when Japan appeared to be overtaking the United States economically, fueling resentment in America and arrogance in Japan. Now that Japan has endured a decade of economic stagnation and the U.S. has reemerged as the engine of global growth, Dower's concerns seem overblown (though, to be fair, they were widely shared at the time - and may return one day). More troubling, he is hypersensitive and defensive about anything he sees as a slight against Japan. Dower labors to disprove the notion that the Japanese are robotic drones who can't think for themselves. He certainly shows that the conformist label is exaggerated and simplistic. But he sometimes strains to make his point. For example, Dower attempts to unearth signs of grassroots resistance to the militaristic rule that led Japan (and much of the world) to bloody disaster in the 1930s and `40s. He notes, for example, that police investigated more than 2,000 rumors in Tokyo between 1941 and 1945. I think my own workplace produces rumors at a faster pace than that. Given the magnitude of the militarists' folly and the agony they caused in Japan, it strikes me as staggering that no one seriously tried to stop them. A low-level whispering campaign, a few furtive communists scribbling anti-Emperor graffiti and some unhappy factory workers calling in sick just don't cut it.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
John Dower is the outstanding figure in the field of cold war, especially in Japan. His Pulitzer awarded book, 'Embracing Defeat', could be regarded as the cream of his career. If you read it already, you don't need to pick up this, I think. This book is no more than a collection of essays. So you chould not expect any integrity among papers. You'd better select essay to your needs. Sure, the quality of essays is not bad.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
John Dower rules.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
While the topics included within this book are facinating, I found the author's writing style very hard to follow. Each essay seemed a disjointed stream of facts just as if this was an early draft waiting to be pieced together.If I were to grade this academic's work, he'd get a C-.
What's most surprising is that the author's other book on a similar topic is "Embracing Defeat" which is a good read and I definitely recommend.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse