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JavaServer Faces 1st Edition

3.1 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0596005399
ISBN-10: 0596005393
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Hans Bergsten is the founder of Gefion Software, a company focused on Java services and products based on the J2EE technlogies. Hans has been an active participant in the working groups for both the servlet and JSP specifications from the time they were formed. He also contributes to other related JCP specifications, such as JSP Standard Tag Libraries (JSTL), and helped get the development of the Apache Tomcat reference implementation for servlet and JSP started as one of the initial members of the Apache Jakarta Project Management Committee.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 624 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1st edition (April 30, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596005393
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596005399
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,352,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Okay... if you have any modicum of experience with Java web technologies, but are looking at expanding your horizons, DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK! It will frustrate you beyond belief.

1. The author spends over 60 pages just introducing JSP: If I wanted a book on JSP there are already plenty available, and much better at explaining it since the author does a very sparse job of it.

2. The author spends 7 pages just discussing HTTP! If you don't know what HTTP is, once again there are better introductory books on web technologies.

3. The author's examples are rarely fully explained, but instead he continuously uses mere 'snippets' without ever giving the entire code. I understand that the code is available online, but I don't want to toggle between reading code on my computer and then having to flip through pages in a book: Keep it all in one place.

4. The author also spends a fair portion of the book talking about other non-JSF related issues: Internationalization, CSS, Tabular data???? (which, by the way, is a horrible example that does not model anything close to a real-world example.)

5. Over 200 pages of the book are simply reference pages which are available to anyone online (which is when you want them since that's when you're coding!)

6. He has 36 pages (in appendix C pp. 444-476) on the HTML-Specific Component classes... read through these and see exactly how useful this reference is: It only lists the components and the litany of methods with absolutely no explanation.

7. He never really adequately puts all the pieces together and shows the JSF novice how to create anything that resembles something that would be a good starting point for real-world development.
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Format: Paperback
This book is an "OK" starting point for someone learning JSF.

Here are some things to be aware of:

1) Does a poor job explaining the lifecycle of a JSF component; he writes the sequence of events out in paragraph style and does not provide diagrams (UML or otherwise) to help with the illustration

2) Constantly switches metaphors as he is explaining JSF; sometimes he will be talking about the implementation view of a JSF component and then other times he will be talking about the application view of a component. It would be better if there were one or two chapters that focused on the "how the heck does this work behind the scenes" and the rest of the book focused on applying JSF.

3) There are syntax errors throughout the examples; this includes the code examples (.jsp examples) and the configuration examples (web.xml and faces-config.xml). To his credit, he constantly references the appendix section for a more complete example. As a reader, I personally don't like flipping back and forth all the time.

4) His coverage of the application (using JSF actions) is very basic (academic). He doesn't go through the academically classified edge-cases, which is disapppointing because those are typically classified as real-world.

5) He forward references way too much; for example he will talk about / use something in say chapter 4, and then states something to the effect "oh, we'll come back to that later, don't worry about it now". From a learning perspective this is terrible. It causes your train of thought to be derailed and you end up asking yourself the question "what does that do?".

On the positive side, the flow does seem to make some sense from a learning perspective.
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Format: Paperback
1/4 of the book goes explains how to use JSP, JSTL

2/4 of the book API reprint

1/4 of the book actual JSF stuff - not real world related - unless you know exactly what you are looking for you'll never find it...

i'm surprised this book went into print - probably somebody upstairs decided to have at least something rather than nothing.

waste of time and money.
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By A Customer on May 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
There is no reason to buy this book. I am not saying that it's totally useless - but information in this book can be easily obtained for free in other places. One of them is the Sun's j2ee 1.4 tutorial updated for JSF final release.
The book borrows a lot from JSF specs - well, just go and read specs. As an example, the book has custom tree component - you can find open source JSF tree components on the Web as well. In fact, out of 590 pages in the book, 260 pages (!) are various appendices with what can be considered an official JSF information (APIs, tag description, etc.).
The language is good, but what's in the book, in essence, does not go beyond regular blurb about JSF now in abundance in various articles, Sun's site, etc. However, there are few insights about what is called JSF infrastructure and its API. And that's where the tricky part with the JSF is - you can learn without this book about JSF "phases" and how to use components for presentation purposes - but this is not enough for real world Web applications. The author, as far as I understand, is the member of the original JSF team - it would be nice to hear from such person more about areas of JSF weaknesses and how to deal with them vs. other frameworks which put a stress on the controller aspects in building applications (such as Struts).
Unfortunately, from this perspective this book is not more useful than other sources (available though for free).
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