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Joe Golem and the Drowning City: An Illustrated Novel by [Mignola, Mike, Golden, Christopher]
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Joe Golem and the Drowning City: An Illustrated Novel Kindle Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 24 customer reviews

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Length: 284 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 2108 KB
  • Print Length: 284 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; Ill edition (March 27, 2012)
  • Publication Date: March 27, 2012
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00633W3Z8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #599,161 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Eric J. Guignard on April 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
REVIEWED: Joe Golem and the Drowning City: An Illustrated Novel
WRITTEN BY: Christopher Golden and illustrated by Mike Mignola
PUBLISHED: March, 2012

Great, fun book. A wild, imaginative adventure in an alternative sinking New York, amongst a cast of strange specters, magic rites, and steampunk. Imagine the grittiest visions of Batman's Gotham City being submerged and taken over by H.P. Lovecraft - that's a visual to the world that Christopher Golden has created. The book was rich in story that twisted like a wicked serpent and seduces you with its beautiful smile. Mignola's artwork, though infrequent, is characteristic of his deconstructed style that tells a vignette through a simple image.

Five out of Five stars
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By smitty jones on September 12, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very entertaining book. Their is a lot of creativity in this book. Great setting, and plotted very well. Would have gotten a five from me had it not been for the main heroine and the villain. I just did not like the heroine. She was a little to generic for my likes. The main villain was also to cliché for me.

Something that Golden did very well was his descriptions. Everything in the book is described vividly. From what the characters look like to the setting. Their is also a great description of something at the end of the book, although I'm not going to spoil it.

Something I was looking forward to was Mignola's illustrations, however I found them somewhat disappointing.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Joe Golem and the Drowning City, by Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden is not the first book I have read by either author. These authors are two of the most ingenious writers when it comes to fantasy, and horror. I was eager to devour this one, and it did not disappoint.
Imagine an alternate NYC, devastated by rising waters and earthquakes. Lower Manhattan has been flooded, and is now inhabited by a poor and degenerate population. Every thief and dark element of the population has found its way there, and life is meant only for those who can survive by quickness and sharp wits. The crumbling buildings are half submerged and their roofs and spires stab through the dark waters. The lower portion of Manhattan is living in the shadow of upper Manhattan, which continues to thrive and prosper. Here's a glimpse of the flooded city:

"A light rain speckled the glass, but the waves on Twenty-ninth Street were only a light surface ripple. A steam taxi clanked loudly as it ferried its passengers through the canals of the sunken city. Chinese gondoliers often piled the waters in this neighborhood, but Felix could see none of them today." (From the book.)

Here, in the `drowning city,' we meet Mollie and Felix.
Felix Orlov has befriended Molly McHugh, and he is the only father she has ever known. Felix considers himself a conjurer, a magician and seer, but he is much more than that. He is more than he envisions, more than his dreams tell him he is, but he doesn't realize it. Sometimes it is difficult to see where dreams end and reality begins. One evening, Felix is torn away from Molly by the gas-men, and she has to flee for her own life. Joe comes to her rescue.
So who is Joe, and what is a Golem. Joe is a brute of a man, an assistant to a Victorian detective named Mr.
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Format: Hardcover
First let me start by saying that this is an "illustrated novel" and is not to be confused with "graphic novel." Some people expect an illustrated novel to be like a comic, but it is not. It is a novel with the occasional illustration. If you've read any of Golden's previous novels with Mignola, then you know what to expect.
If you are expecting a comic book form, then it is your mistake for confusing illustrated novel with graphic novel. They are not the same thing.

With that said, this book is very good. It is full of the mystery that Mignola is known for, as well as a well written story that we've come to expect from Golden. This isn't their first novel together, but it is arguably their best so far. Characters are well developed and you will care about them. There is a lot of action and suspense that will keep you turning pages in anticipation for what comes next. The pacing is just right, and the overall plot will keep you guessing.
If you enjoy reading Hellboy novels, then you will enjoy this book.
The only downside is that it ends a bit too soon, and I wish it would have lasted longer...it was that good.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The story is enjoyable, the characters are likable/hatable as appropriate, and the art is a great match for the story. The spunky heroine is actually spunky, a thinker, and does her best to do the right thing; Joe Golem himself is . . . a puzzle, and I wish we found out more about him. We find out his story, but not as much actually about Joe as he lives and exists today, which is a shame. However, the book is an enjoyable read, even if it won't be a frequent reread.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Only Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden would have the audacity to try and write a Victorian literature-inspired, Lovecraft-themed children's book. And only those two would have the talent and charm necessary to pull it off. They throw everything in here; Victorian spiritualists and conjurors, Jewish monsters, steam-pumping Sherlock Holmes stand-ins, magical objects, and a giant tentacle monsters coming from between space. And they make it all fit together.

Like most intelligent human beings, I am a huge fan of Mike Mignola's Hellboy. His particular brand of folklore-based, pulp-infused serves up exactly what I want in a comic. I had trepidation about reading him as an author--a good comic book writer does not a good book author make. But he found a solid partner in Christopher Golden, and their Hans Christian Andersen/Decameron-inspired fable Baltimore,: Or, The Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire was a brilliant book. I have been enjoying their comic book version even more, which has become a favorite.

So I was excited by this follow up novel, "Joe Golem and the Drowning City." I had no idea of the story, but I knew I was in for a treat.

The story has a slow start, and doesn't grip you right away. Little Molly McHugh makes for a good lead children's character--she is smart and resourceful, and not without an edge. She knows about evil.
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