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John Coltrane Quartet Plays (Expanded Edition)

March 11, 1997 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:59
30
2
12:57
30
3
8:03
30
4
9:54
30
5
6:25
30
6
7:06
30
7
8:00
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 11, 1997
  • Release Date: March 11, 1997
  • Label: Impulse! Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1997 GRP Records Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 59:24
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V673S0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #170,303 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Tyler Smith on March 5, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Like 1962's "Coltrane", and 1964's "Crescent" this album sometimes gets overlooked in Trane's discography, because it was a launching point for more tumultuous and/or influential releases that came after. On its own merits, it's very much an album worth having.
The release followed "A Love Supreme," so it's virtually assured that it will suffer a bit in comparison. But the comparison is really an unfair one, since Coltrane was clearly on to other vistas with this album from those he achieved in "A Love Supreme." The entire mood of "Plays" is more searching and less contemplative. It features a blistering soprano attack on "Chim Chim Cheree," that has nothing to do with his prior interpretations of standards (e.g., "My Favorite Things" and "Greensleeves") and searching, slow-paced tenor pieces that seem more restless than "Psalm," certainly," from "A Love Supreme," and even more agressive than that album's "Pursuit" and "Resolution."
Eric Nisenson, in his fine biography of Coltrane, "Ascension," gives shorter shrift to this album than I think seems right. He seems, for example, disturbed by the restlessness at the heart of (for me) the album's best track, "Song of Praise," but I feel, "A Song of Praise" encapsulates the questing attitude of the album and adds to its appeal.
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Format: Audio CD
1. Chim Chim Cheree 6:56
2. Brazilia 12:54
3. Nature Boy 8:01
4. Song of Praise 9:47
5. Feelin' Good 6:21
6. Nature Boy 7:03
7. Nature Boy 8:18

John Coltrane, tenor & soprano sax
McCoy Tyner, piano
Jimmy Garrison, bass
Art Davis, bass (3, 5, 6)
Elvin Jones, drums

The amazing thing about the Classic Quartet is that even after recording A Love Supreme, one of the greatest and most influential records of all time, they could still go right back into the studio and blow everyone away again, in a completely different way. This disc has some very pleasant surprises.

"Chim Chim Cheree" is a tune from the movie Mary Poppins. How many people could take a song from a Disney movie and put an avant-jazz edge on it? Simply brilliant. It's done in 3/4 with Coltrane on soprano.

To make the set even better, Art Davis is added as a second bass player on "Feelin' Good" and the studio versions of "Nature Boy." Davis had been a member of Coltrane's early group in 1961, but he left soon afterward (I'm not sure exactly when). He still appeared at occasional studio sessions, including the Ascension date and the alternate versions of "Acknowledgement" from A Love Supreme. In my opinion, he is one of the most overlooked and underrated bass players in jazz. His voice on his instrument is entirely individual and singular.

"Brazilia" dates back to 1961 Village Vanguard and is given a new workout here with a few minor adjustments. Great interplay between Coltrane and Elvin. However, the really unique pieces here are "Nature Boy" and "Song Of Praise." It may not be obvious at first, but "Nature Boy" is in 5/4 time (after the out-of-time intro), which is interesting because the song was not originally written in 5/4.
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Format: Audio CD
Why this one is always overlooked I just don't understand. Originally conceived as a "covers" album (see liner notes) Trane takes Chim Chim Cheree and Nature Boy even further out than he had done with My Favorite Things while the Brazilia and Song of Praise are excellent examples of Coltrane's compositions at the time.
While its great that labels want to include bonus tracks sometimes the set would be better without them. Here its mixed. Feeling Good is an ok track from the same time period while the two bonus Nature Boy versions are very interesting.
Plays (along with perhaps Sun Ship) is a great palce to start a post Love Supreme collection.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Once again, The John Coltrane Quartet released another first rate ‘standard’
when it came out in 1965 to generally warm praise and turned out to be another
instant success, which ranks alongside Lush Life (1957), The Stardust Sessions
(1958), Ballads (1963) and John Coltrane Meets Johnny Hartman (1966) as one
of most beloved standard albums. Highlighted by a beautiful majestic tone that’s
performed with grace and true excellence, The John Coltrane Quartet Plays is a
splendidly-made modern classic featuring a few classic standards and even one
composition written by Coltrane himself, and released at the time during the sky
scraping self-affirming success of A Love Supreme, it proved to become such a
equally successful hit. Beginning with open track Chim Chim Cheree—the most
interesting song from Mary Poppins, the rich subtle track set proceed closely on
few extended track versions on Brazilia, Nature Boy, the personally encouraging
Song Of Praise, Feeling Good (also a hit for Gerry Mulligan in 1966) and even a
bive reindition of Nature Boy. Again doubling on tenor and soprano saxophones,
The John Coltrane Quartet Plays highly showcases the off-pitched sound that is
more closely resembled to an Indian raga or a Korean pitched sound as the true
rhythm section piles up an enormous flurry of sound where despite the apparen-
tly conventional divisions of themes and solos, Coltrane plays with an amusingly
forward artistry as the collective quartet experimentation make this an important
and beloved tour de force.
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