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Just Another Diamond Day (LP Miniature) Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Korean Pressing Housed in a Paper Sleeve. 01. Diamond Day 02. Glow Worms 03. Lily Pond 04. Timothy Grub 05. Where I Like To Stand 06. Swallow Song 07. Window Over The Bay 08. Rose Hip November 09. Come Wind Come Rain 10. Hebridean Sun 11. Rainbow River 12. Trawlerman's Song 13. Jog Along Bess 14. Iris's Song For Us 15. Love Song 16. I'd Like To Walk Around In Your Mind 17. Winter Is Blue 18. Iris's Song (Version Two)

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Media Arte Kr
  • ASIN: B000M77PLS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,734,581 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
In the last couple of years Vashti has performed her first live set in over three decades at the Royal Festival Hall; duetted with Devendra Banhart on his Rejoicing In The Hands album; recorded with Piano Magic; sung on a Simon Raymonde collaboration, and with Animal Collective on their Prospect Hummer EP; and recorded a new album for Fat Cat, with guest appearances from the likes of Joanna Newsom and hopefully the arranger Robert Kirby. She has been cited as an influence by a whole new generation of young performers of avant folk and has a higher profile than she has had since her initial emergence on a single produced by Andrew Oldham and in TV appearances for Ready Steady Go! in 1965. Reviews of the single, Some Things Just Stick In Your Mind, a Jagger/Richard song which the two Stones had initially placed with Dick and Deedee the year before, variously described her as "the new Marianne Faithfull" and the "female Bob Dylan." 

The reason for all this renewed activity was the re-issue in 2000 (2004 in the US) to great acclaim of her only album, Just Another Diamond Day, which had originally crept into the shops in 1970, without fanfare or promotion. "Nobody seemed to give it a second thought when it was released", says Vashti on her website, "In fact it was not really released, it just edged its way out, blushed and shuffled off into oblivion. I abandoned it, and music, forever as I went on to travel more with horses and wagons, with children and more dogs and chickens." 

However, in the intervening years it has become regarded as a cult classic, with vinyl copies passing hands among collectors for ever increasing sums.
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Format: Audio CD
Vashti Bunyan's "Just Another Diamond Day" belongs in the pantheon of the greatest folk records of all time. This record captures not only the essence of an age, but a way of thinking about our world that has too often been overlooked or forgotten. This is not a "cult" classic - it's a classic, period. It is an important and ageless record, as vital today as it was when it was released, if not more so. A touching thing of pristine, rare beauty.
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Format: Audio CD
It is highly refreshing that this relic of simple beauty has not been utterly lost in the shuffle. Vashti's gentle voice and quiet, short meditations on dreamy, rustic life strike a chord with a society that is constantly on the move.

She herself DID go to that life after this single record...Though it is too bad she could not transcend her shyness to make more records, I must say that this album is a testament to the influence of traditional folk music on the experimental scene today. To go back to the beauteous structures allows us to move forth, deconstruct, and manipulate the essence of our musicality.

We are also reminded that the extremely short song is no less powerful and evocative.

In short, this album should be enough to lull even Mike Tyson. Simplicity has rarely been showcased like Vashti Bunyan performed it.
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Format: Audio CD
When I first heard about this record, it was in relation to Devendra Banhart, and then I heard a little about Vashti's life. How she had recorded a Mick Jagger song, but felt uncomfortable with pop-stardom, finding performing her own compositions infinitely more rewarding. Fleeing London, she set off with another free spirit, a horse and a wagon to live a wandering life. The songs on 'Just another diamond day' were written on this journey, and later recorded by Joe Boyd back in London, with some string arrangements by Robert Kirby, but the album has only become widely appreciated very recently.

Given these links to Nick Drake and the gorgeous story behind the album, I was an instant sucker for its charms. Vashti's voice may at first seem detached and fey, but in time you come to love its openness and clarity. It's a voice that is beautifully open to life, nature and love, and gorgeously complimented by the sparse, crisp guitar and string arrangements.

That said, the song writing is not always fully satisfying. The songs are short, sweet and rarely develop beyond their initial mood and tone. In this way, her influence on Devendra is clear - concise, simple songs with a singular mood. I've heard Vashti compared to Joanna Newsom, but I disagree - while Joanna's songs (especially 'Sadie') are intricate and fascinating in their form, Vashti's are very straightforward, the lyrics also strikingly simple.

However, the absolute sincerity of Vashti's voice and the album's sheer prettiness mean that this simplicity is not a major problem. It's intimate and soothing - the kind of thing to listen to when you want Nick Drake's gorgeous melodies and atmosphere but without the melancholic intensity. All early-morning light and winter sunshine...
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Format: Audio CD
For certain people, music is more than some random noise to dance to or listen to while painting the bedrooms. Sometimes it can just stop you in your tracks. Vashti Bunyan does that for anyone that considers themself her fan. You won't find many casual Vashti fans as her music just seems too engaging to turn away. For those who listen to her are likely to love her regardless of anything. Sure, she might be too demure or at first sound too fragile and sensitive for bedrockheads who run through walls, people, and steel to get what they want out of life, let alone music. But others will suddenly sit still and scratch their heads wondering where this marvelous music has been hiding all their lives.

Most may have discovered it through a cell phone commercial in 2006; that would be this albums opening cut. Indeed, the sublime splash of Diamond Day introduces us to a world as provocative to us as it was to Vashti when she left the modern world for a rustic commune in 1967 until the album's recording in 1969. Throughout the album, the lyrics detail 2 years of experiences involving relationships, nature and the sudden happiness she discovered after a depressing and jaded stint through the pop market in the mid 60s. Sure, there is some world weariness sprinkled throughout and her voice can still relay a sense of despondency, but more often than not, as exemplified by songs like Come wind Come Rain, Jog Along Bess, and Where I Like to Stand, she hopes, yearns and quietly celebrates her life while the musicians move the songs in jaunty folk arrangements filled with recorders, Irish harps, mandolins and banjoes without effects or any progressive trappings popular at the time. The music is often a perfect compliment for her songs.
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