Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $5.23 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Justice Cascade: How ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: There are multiple library labels on the dust cover. Otherwise, book is in excellent like new condition. Pages are free from tears, curling, writing, highlighting, bends, etc. **Fast Amazon Shipping, delivery tracking number, no hassle return policy. Your satisfaction guaranteed.**
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics (The Norton Series in World Politics) Hardcover – September 26, 2011

3.7 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$22.72
$14.00 $7.90

Featured titles on Prisons and Justice System
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform
$22.72 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics (The Norton Series in World Politics)
  • +
  • "A Problem from Hell": America and the Age of Genocide
Total price: $39.20
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Sikkink has written a wonderfully smart, thought-provoking new study of the global spread of criminal trials for horrific human rights abuses. This powerful book gives hope for the future of human rights.” (Gary Bass, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University)

“This marvelous book combines lucid reason with deep passion. Cascading through the nooks and crannies of international life, justice’s call is now heard loud and clear by those in power. The Justice Cascade will become an instantaneous classic that all students of international politics will read and refer to for years to come.” (Peter J. Katzenstein, Walter S. Carpenter, Jr. Professor of International Studies, Cornell University)

The Justice Cascade is an immensely engaging account of a scholar’s own personal journey and of how to combine moral passion with systematic social scientific investigation.” (Robert O. Keohane, Professor of International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Kathryn Sikkink is a Regents Professor and the McKnight Presidential Chair of Political Science at the University of Minnesota. She is the cowinner of the 2000 Grawemeyer Award for "Ideas Improving World Order" and lives in Minneapolis.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: The Norton Series in World Politics
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (September 26, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393079937
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393079937
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #493,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By James T. Ranney on November 21, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a great book, consisting primarily of 1) a terrific history of the growth of prosecutions for violations of human rights (at all levels, national, foreign, and international) and 2) incredible statistical analyses of same, drawing certain conclusions as to their efficacy.
What I liked best was 1) her ability to bring greater clarity to the whole area, and 2) her ability to trace out what I would call "causality" issues (what accounts for the growth of these institutions, etc.).
A GREAT book, vastly informed by the author's personal experiences (especially her years in Argentina) and her personal contacts with many of the key players in this field.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Had to read her book for a class about Transitional Justice. It was like nails on a chalkboard. It's sad because Sikkink actually makes really good points, but her droning on and on and clinical talking is so dry and bland that I would dread having to read a chapter each week. My assignments each week were to pin-point what her main point of each chapter was. Sikkink was so unclear about this that I wound up guessing a lot of the time. It's too bad because she started off strong many times and I was interested in what she had to say, but she spent so much time qualifying her sources or throwing dry statistics at the reader that it made me not want to hear what she had to say because in order to do so, I had to sif through so much useless and dull information. I did give her two stars because the information was there, but you do have to get past all of the dull droning. I would have given her another star for this book if she hadn't been so one-sided with her opinions. My other issue with her book is that she does not address the opposite points of view very well to support her point of view. Finally, she doesn't answer well what could be done in transitional societies to help them transition into a successful society after crimes against humanity were committed. Thankfully, my professor was able to explain a lot better than Sikkink.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am with the reviewer who read this for a graduate-level law class. If you have a passing, armchair interest in human rights, this might be a good book. But if you are undertaking serious study of this subject, choose something else. The author rambles needlessly, discusses her research trail too much rather than what the research revealed, and referenced far too often her personal friends. Waste of time! Wish I could return the kindle version I bought of this book!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Sikkink's look at human rights prosecutions (domestic, foreign, and international) is a great way to learn about the effects of such prosecutions. She begins with a historical account of trials that few ever talk about - Greece and Portugal. From there they explains the statistical findings of just how effective human rights trials are and how the idea of prosecutions has spread. She also uses these findings to look closely at how this all effects the United States, which is an important part of the book. All in all a great introduction to human rights prosecutions.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read this book for a human rights law class offered through my university. This book is very poorly written. The author over uses personal anecdotes and writes in such a casual tone that the book reads like blog instead of academic literature. Content wise, while the author makes some interesting points, she fails to draw any kind of conclusion, rambles from chapter to chapter on the same few principles, and leaves the reader wondering how this is a final draft. Justice Cascade? More like a Justice Trickle. Skip it, this book isn't worth your time.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics (The Norton Series in World Politics)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions Are Changing World Politics (The Norton Series in World Politics)