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Justice for None Audio, Cassette – Abridged, Audiobook

4.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This second outing by coauthors Hackman and Lenihan (Wake of the Perdido Star) centers on Boyd Calvin, a 28-year-old shell-shocked World War I veteran. In 1929, Calvin stops by his ex-wife's home and finds her dead in a pool of blood, while her current boyfriend peruses a Bible in the kitchen. More shots ring out, and the lover is dead. Calvin is seen fleeing the scene, the only suspect. But the question of Calvin's guilt or innocence isn't really the point of the novel, which serves primarily to air the authors' opinions on race, class and the treatment of military veterans in America. When Calvin is initially apprehended, he lands in a jail cell next to George, a black man who's been unjustly charged with—yep, you guessed it—raping a white woman. The two become friends and fugitives together. Calvin shovels guts in a Chicago slaughterhouse and, with the help of George, briefly enters the world of early-20th-century black America and then dabbles in bootlegging. Once Calvin's travels exhaust the authors' apparent interest in exploring the social history of greater Chicago, Calvin turns himself in to the authorities to stand trial. Despite a few compelling scenes, the novel lacks focus and a unified vision, making for a tedious and poorly organized read.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

In their first novel, Wake of the Perdido Star (1999), actor Hackman and coauthor Lenihan combined historical and adventure fiction. In their second collaboration, they mix historical fiction with elements of the murder mystery. As in the previous book, readers must overlook the clumsy prose style ("The sun had climbed to its 9:00 A.M. reserved spot in the sky") in order to appreciate the suspenseful story. Young Boyd Calvin, living in a small town in Illinois in the late 1920s, attempts to put his life and marriage back together after his convalescence in a hospital, where he spent time for mental strain incurred as a doughboy in the Great War. But one night, Boyd's estranged wife is shot dead, and circumstances point to him as the doer of the deed. In jail he gets acquainted with a black man accused of raping a white woman. Add into the equation a woman reporter for a Chicago newspaper who is in town to investigate the murder, and the formula for an exciting yarn springs into place. The authors show a good understanding of locale and time period, and Boyd is portrayed with enough depth to make readers care about him. Brad Hooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Abridged edition (May 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593556659
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593556655
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 6.7 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,773,685 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jon Eric Davidson on May 29, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In their first foray into the realm of fiction, Gene Hackman and Daniel Lenihan created "Wake of the Perdido Star", a novel that I believed to be one of the best seafaring novels of recent memory. It made me very eager for future efforts from this tandem. While it has been several years, the wait was well worth it. Their sophomore effort, "Justice for None", is a dramatic departure from their first work, but is a very enjoyable read.
I was frankly quite surprised that Mr. Hackman and Mr. Lenihan would release a novel that is of an entirely different subject and historical era from their first one. It is something that, I believe, most authors have not pulled off well, and in doing so, have alienated much of their fan base. However, Mr. Hackman and Mr. Lenihan proved to be the exception to this pattern.
"Justice for None" is set in the small Illinois town of Vermilion on the eve of the Great Depression. The story involves Boyd Calvin, a struggling World War I veteran who gets caught up in the murder of his estranged wife, which leads to a pair of runs from justice before a climactic trial to prove his innocence.
The Boyd Calvin character is developed very well, and proves to be an interesting focal point for this story. The authors created someone who elicits in the reader an internal conflict. On the one hand, he is a sympathetic character as he struggles with his dark history in the war, the reconciliation with his wife, and his fight against a justice system in which the odds are wholly against him. On the other, he is almost repulsive, as he consistently resists authority and pushes away those who are trying their hardest to help him. This character development works very well, and is somewhat rare to find in these types of stories.
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Format: Hardcover
I won't go into the storyline - you can read about that above. Just one thing: Don't listen to the critics. This is truely a good book.

I'm very glad I bought it and I'm also sure I'll enjoy a second read. If you like thrillers, adventure stories with solid characters, I suggest you read both the authors' books. All the talk about too many cliches, wobbling storyline - foget about it. Just read it. You won't be disappointed. Promised.
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Format: Hardcover
The atmosphere the authors created swept me back in time to the places and experiences of my youth in Illinois. Justice for None vividly and accurately describes post-World War I Mid-America and combines it with suspense to make a powerful novel. I was totally absorbed by this book and enjoyed it thoroughly.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was eager to find out what kind of writer Gene Hackman would be and I was not disappointed. I am used to more action packed thrillers. This book, was more along the lines of Stephen King's novel "11/22/63": a look at someone within a well developed period of history. It was, in many ways, very visual---almost as if Gene Hackman were writing something very adaptable to film. I plan to read more of his books.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
A great tale/whodunit… Two unlikely jail-birds, Calvin (a tormented WWI vet accused of a double murder) and George (a rural black-man accused of rape) find themselves thrown together temporarily and their exploits and friendship shapes much of the main portion of the book as things increasingly spin out of control. Both have allies, but in the end they must separately combat the personalities who condemned them. The plot has many twists and turns, many of which left me wondering “now, how are they going to get out of that?” Good word depictions of the place and era – dirt poor, down on their luck, life in prohibition and no air-conditioning; and through all of that the authors keep the action coming – not an intellectual masterpiece, but an emotionally serious page turner.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I wish Gene Hackman would write more books. I have also read a western he wrote called "Payback At Morning Peak" which was excellent. Justice for None is a suspenceful story that will keep you reading to the end. I couldn't put it down because I wanted to get to the end to see how it came out.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Justice for None, Calvin Boyd is a World War 1 combat veteran with a decorated past who settles into Illinois just prior to the Great Depression. Calvin is accused of killing his estranged wife, and immediately goes on the run, seeing how the deck is stacked against him in the legal system. Calvin has people on his side who are trying to help him but he always does his best to thrust these people away from him, often becoming his own worst enemy in the process.
The plot is pretty basic and straight forward. There is nothing exceptional about it. I think the best aspect of the novel in terms of the writing was the strong depiction of the setting. The authors do a nice job of setting the mood for both the area of the country and the time-period. The setting also creates the appropriate mood for the story. Calvin Boyd is a fairly likeable character, even though his actions are a bit destructive. Justice For None is a solid but unspectacular read, one that will entertain but not one that is particularly profound.
Carl Alves - author of Blood Street
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