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Showing 1-10 of 849 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 888 reviews
on May 22, 2013
After reading the occasional bad reviews here we ordered three of these KA200's and made a 'QC study'. And sure enough we received two gems and one lemon. The two gems are great. The one lemon had poor reception - compared using same stations - medium signal strength.
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But the two gems are special. Great reception and audio quality. Kaito radios have an audio clarity and projection which are really good for talk radio. The spoken word is easy to understand. Even at low volume you hear voices clearly. This crisp sound quality may be addictive. After listening with these, some other radios may sound muddled. We have three other Kaito models - the KA11 and KA123 and KA210. These other models also have good crisp audio. There may be something special about Kaito speakers, or maybe the audio circuitry. This KA200 is small and light - see mugshot lineup photos above. Hardly noticeable in shirt pocket. Great for walks - the sharp audio quality cuts through background noise like wind or traffic. Would be nice if it had connection for wrist-strap. Maybe can be added.
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Weight: 2.3 ounces - (without batteries)
Dimensions: 3.6 x 2.2 x 0.8 inches
FM Antenna: extends to 7.0 inches

* Optional Carry Case - this HDE Neoprene Case is a great fit for the KA200
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on February 21, 2013
I own the Sony ICF-S10MK2 and also bought the Kaito KA200 because of it's smaller size. After listening to both, I have to say the Sony is the winner in almost every department. The Kaito beats the Sony only in size, and the fact that it takes two AAA batteries instead of two AA.

In NYC, the Sony receives more stations, tunes more precisely, and plays louder before its speaker distorts. The sound of the Kaito is harsher and can be hard on your ears. Unlike the Sony, the volume control is not ganged to the on/off switch but is inconveniently located on top of the radio, making it a two step process. The tuning dial is considerably stiffer than the Sony, and requires a bit more patience to tune "dead center" without overshooting your mark.

Nevertheless, the Kaito is still an OK radio and has its place, especially when traveling. However, it can't beat the Sony in overall performance. Not to mention, you can usually purchase the Sony at a cheaper price, although that would be my last consideration. If size is not important, my recommendation is to go Sony!
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on October 16, 2016
I know it's an inexpensive unit, but the positive reviews made me think it would be decent. The reception is poor. Compared to my old Sony pocket transistor AM/FM, the Kaito is a disappointment on several levels. First, the antenna is short which is partially responsible for the poor FM reception. Secondly, the tuner knob is very small and it has slack in it, so it is difficult to make small adjustments in the tuning with out overshooting and going past the desired station. For FM, the tuner is very inaccurate in the sense that the radio keeps trying to tune into the same station on the lower end of the dial and I know that station isn't even supposed to be on the lower end of the dial. Lastly AM reception is weak at best. I cannot recommend this product for any use.
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on September 21, 2010
This radio is impossibly small and has unexpectly good sound through the external speaker. I bought it only for external listening but I can say that the earphone is compatible with stereo headphones--that is to say that it plays monaural audio through both earphone channels.

The AM reception is superb. I don't know how they did it in such a small package; perhaps they used their experience with shortware receivers in this radio. Very sensitive FM reception but it has a touch too much resistance for fine tuning. On the other hand, the volume knob needs much more resistance because I found myself accidentally muting or blasting the audio. It also has a rather fragile FM antenna that does not swivel or sweep at all--you bend it, you break it.

At this size it's a good compromise. The FM is nothing to write home about but the AM reception is just incredible for such a tiny radio.
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on December 5, 2010
I was looking for a small pocket radio for pocket change. This is that radio. For the change I paid, I am happy it did not have any bells and whistles (it doesnt even come with an earphone, flimsy cover or crappy demo batteries). Every penny seems to have gone into the core components and it does an excellent job of catching am and fm waves and converting them to audio. Recommended if you are looking for a small, cheap, utilitarian am/fm radio.
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on September 12, 2013
I've been on an AM/FM Radio kick as of late, and since most of these little radios will last longer than some MP3 players and smartphones of today, I figured for the price(s), I'd test out some small pocket-sized radios of differing makes and models.

Enter the Kaito KA200S...it has only the most basic features of other transistor radios in its class, but at only a fraction of the competing radios' respective sizes. As a pocket/pack transistor radio, it doesn't get much lighter or compact than this, and therein lies this radio's greatest strengths--its small footprint and ease of portability. I've only had the radio for a few days, but here are my findings so far:

◘ Size: The minute size and weight of this radio will honestly make you forget that it's in your pocket, and that can be a good thing (just make sure not to sit on it). Some have complained that the tuning/volume wheels are too jumpy, and while I'm sure some defective units have shipped out, I find a lot of these complaints stem from improper usage on such a small radio. For a radio this small, you're supposed to let part of your thumb rest against the radio's frame (to create a slight bit of resistance) while gently rolling the wheel with the other part of the same thumb (using the frame's resistance on the thumb to slow down the turning). The same goes for volume AND tuning. If your thumb/finger is ONLY touching the dial, you are setting yourself up to jump all over the place, especially on a radio this small.

◘ Durability: The Kaito KA200S seems to be built to a decent durability standard. I would not expect it to work properly after dropping it a few times onto a hard surface, but I actually don't abuse my electronics. I still have my first AM/FM radio from when I was eight years old (I'm 31 now), and it still works (barely). If you don't abuse this little radio/expose it to a lot of water, it should last you a long time.

◘ Battery Life: Because of the unit's size, using 2 AAA batteries seems to be the only battery option that would fit this little wonder. I would think that a single AA would give longer life (much like the transistor-style Sony Walkman--model SRF59SILVER), but as it stands a good set of rechargeable AAA's should give quite a few hours of listening pleasure. I will update this review as I get more use out of this radio.

◘ Sound Quality: It's hard to do so, but I'm taking away one star for the sound quality, specifically with regards to music reproduction. As a portable talk radio, this little unit shines. Played at lower volumes, it does music well enough, but let's be honest...for a small cone with these dimensions, one should not expect beautifully-rendered music playback. For better music quality, one should go with the Sony ICF-S10MK2 (the trade-off, of course, being the Sony's larger size)

◘ Reception: Not much different than other transistor-style units...there are dead spots and the possibility of nearby appliances or transmitters creating interference. If you're listening to it on the move, expect a little fuzz here and there. If you find a sweet spot and listen to it in one location (once again, especially for talk radio), it will do just fine.

Bottom Line: You could do a lot worse spending $10-$12 on a radio (see: Anything by Coby). If you are obsessive about shaving grams off of your load, be it for hiking/travel/cycling purposes, this radio fits the bill for being the lightest, smallest radio of good quality out there. If you wish to hear only talk radio, this radio will give you hours of listening pleasure without breaking the bank. If you wish to hear more music than talk (especially if you wish to hear it clearly at higher volumes), go with the Sony ICF-S10MK2 for roughly the same price, at the cost of a little more size/weight.
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VINE VOICEon April 11, 2011
This is a very small radio - smaller than your average clamshell cell phone. It's nicely rounded and feels great in the hand. It looks pretty sharp for what it is - an analog AM/FM radio. For an outdated thing like that it looks appropriately retro, although I think they were going for the more no-nonsense design. In fact, the whole thing is no-nonsense.

The speaker sounds decent, there's only one switch (Off/AM/FM), a telescoping antenna, a battery compartment (two AAA), and a headphone jack. There's no clock, no snooze, no strap, no bass-boost, sound does come out of both earphones - but it's mono... you get the point.

The ONE fancy thing is the green "tune" light that fades up and down depending on signal strength/tuning. The tuning dial itself is on the side and tiny, but what it lacks in size it makes up for in tightness, and making tiny adjustments is very easy. The AM antenna is internal so you improve the already good reception by rotating the unit.

It's $12, and it's a solid little radio. It's not a POS COBY or something, and you're getting what you pay for, and you're paying only for the radio. I got this strictly for the summer for ball games at the beach or the stadium - beats paying 5x as much for the MLB package on the phone and then searching around for 3G or WiFi all the time.

Good so far, and if you've read all this it's probably exactly what you're looking for too.
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on November 13, 2016
When it comes to small pocket radios, the Kaito KA-200 is a great little thing that surprises me because of it's unusually high build quality. Most of the time when you are buying small electronics they tend to rattle, or the tolerances in quality are so much that the product doesn't work well, but the KA-200 works very well and feels solid. It doesn't feel like it will blow into pieces if dropped by accident. In addition to it's very good build quality, it has a nice form factor and the sound is excellent for such a small device. It takes 2 AAA type batteries, and the headphone jack sounds well enough, it will play mono out of both headphones.

All in all this is a great product, I could easily see it going in a survival bag or car for emergency situation, considering it weighs next to nothing (Even with the batteries, in my opinion.) Great stuff.
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on November 17, 2016
My husband wanted a small radio that fits in the pocket. We received this radio and its smaller than I thought it would be but the sound is FANTASTIC! He absolutely LOVES IT! He has had it on since opening the package. There is nothing fancy about it but it is exactly what he wanted. The sound quality is better than our larger radio. I am very happy with this purchase and for the price it can't be beat. Sometimes old school is best.
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on October 28, 2014
This is a SMALL radio, about the size of a deck of cards. My kids each wanted a small personal radio, usable with both earphones, and an external speaker, and one wound up getting this one, the other the Sony ICF-S10MK2.
If you want the smallest radio you can find, that still works decently, this is the one to get, IMO. It uses easy to find AAA batteries, and the battery door is captive, meaning that you unlatch it, and it hinges open, still attached to the radio, where it won't get lost (a plus for a kid's radio). Sound quality is surprisingly good for such a tiny thing, and the controls work well. The FM antenna pulls straight up, and does not swivel, but seems sturdy for a radio in this price point. I especially like the precise volume control, which lets even a kid get it 'just right', so they can hear it without it being too loud. The Sony I mentioned will put out more volume, but the volume control is kind of touchy at the lower settings, making it hard to set a precise volume at a low level. By this, I mean quiet enough to not disturb the other child in the same room. The Kaito, however can be precisely set from a whisper, to a pretty fair volume (loud enough for any personal use I can think of, but not at all what you would use to fill a room with sound). This would be a great radio to drop in your pocket to take to ball games, or similar, as it is so small you'd hardly know it was there.
Tuning is good, but not stellar. Again, it amazes me how well it works for being so tiny, and at such a low cost, but don't expect full-size radio performance. It catches local stations well, but distant stations tend to get drowned out by a strong station bleeding over, if it is close to the same frequency, but not too bad. In fact, I would have considered the tuner to be great or even borderline excellent for a small radio if not for the aforementioned Sony. It has to have about as good of a tuner as I have, in any radio, in both AM, and FM. Don't get me wrong, the Kaito isn't bad, it just isn't up to the level of the Sony. They both have a tuning indicator light, which glows when the radio catches a signal, and the stronger the signal, the brighter it glows. A nice touch, especially for kids going through the dial, trying to see what they can listen to.
Both work well with headphones, send sound to both ears, but not in stereo.
My quick verdict, buy this one where size is the most important factor (again, like a deck of cards). It seems well made, has precise volume control, and decent reception. It also has a more precise volume control.
Buy the Sony, if you can live with a bigger radio (literally double the size, but still fairly small, about the size of the old 9V transistor radios from the 70s) but the tuner is superior, both in sensitivity to weak stations, as well as the ability to hold a weaker station without hearing another station bleeding into it.
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