Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.54
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good copy, cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage. Binding may have light creases. Lots of life left in these pages. May contain very minimal writing/highlighting or notations.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Kakapo Rescue: Saving the World's Strangest Parrot (Scientists in the Field Series) Hardcover – Bargain Price, May 24, 2010

4.5 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, Bargain Price, May 24, 2010
$3.05 $1.52
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$27.85

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Middle School, The Worst Years of My Life
Middle School, The Worst Years of My Life
Bestselling author James Patterson's most beloved middle grade protagonist, Rafe Khatchadorian, is getting the Hollywood treatment. Hardcover
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. Grade 5–8—Take a parrot. Color it green. Give it soft, fluffy feathers, and whiskers. Give it sumo proportions and take away its power of flight. Make it nocturnal, and have it nest underground. Aha! A kakapo! Once millions of these rather affable birds waddled all over New Zealand. Reduced (at present) to fewer than 90, the kakapo have been isolated on Codfish Island (free of feral cats, weasels, and stoats—all introduced species) and are now under the strict, careful guardianship of the New Zealand National Kakapo Recovery Team. Montgomery and Bishop were granted 10 days in which to accompany members of the team (many volunteering their time and efforts) as they radio-tracked the birds night and day in their forest habitat, weighed chicks, watched nesting behavior through hidden cameras, and plowed through gale-force winds and torrential rain to monitor the well-being of their charges. Excellent photos and a readable, conversational text provide an intimate look at a concerted effort to save a drastically endangered species unfamiliar to most of the world outside Down Under. Readers who enjoyed this author/photographer team's The Tarantula Scientist (2007) or Quest for the Tree Kangaroo (2006, both Houghton) will gobble up this tribute to ecological science in action.—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* Montgomery and Bishop, whose highly lauded titles include two Sibert Honor Books, offer yet another winning entry in the Scientists in the Field series. This time, the intrepid duo heads to a remote island off the southern tip of New Zealand, where they join a local government-sponsored research team that is working to save the Kakapo parrot from extinction. Weighing in at nearly nine pounds, these beautiful, honey-scented, once-ubiquitous creatures, named “the most wonderful of all living birds” by a nineteenth-century naturalist, have become a symbol of human civilization's devastating effects on indigenous life, and the New Zealand government is directing significant resources to try to ensure the species' survival. As usual, Montgomery's delight in her subject is contagious, and throughout her enthusiastic text, she nimbly blends scientific and historical facts with immediate, sensory descriptions of fieldwork. Young readers will be fascinated by the incredible measures that the passionate workers follow to help the new birds hatch, and many will share the team's heartbreak when some chicks die. Bishop's photos of the creatures and their habitat are stunning; an awe-inspiring, closing image of the world's eighty-seventh known Kakapo emerging from its shell captures the miracle of birth, for any species. Like many of the team's previous titles, this offers excellent support for units about animal conservation. Grades 4-7. --Gillian Engberg
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Series: Scientists in the Field Series
  • Hardcover: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (May 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618494170
  • ASIN: B0052HL73U
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 11 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,916,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Heather J. Keimig on February 23, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I just finished reading this book aloud over lunch to my kids (six of them, ages 13 to 2) and I would say that it was a hit, overall. As you might expect with that age range, there were various degrees of "getting it" amongst the kids! However, we have also watched a DVD series called *Last Chance to See* that originally introduced us to the Kakapo, so that helped.

Pros: fantastic photos! Wow! The text is enthusiastic, beautifully descriptive and has some nicely placed tongue-in-cheek parts. I was particularly interested in the sidebar piece on the original New Zealand conservationist, Richard Henry, and have assigned my 13yo the work of doing a report on him...seems like a great story waiting to be written by someone.

Cons: Perhaps I was looking (personally) for some bits of more adult 'depth' to the writing and that would have been out of place for the overall work and it's anticipated audience; I'm not sure. I was greatly saddened by the unspoken but clear ENORMOUS amounts of money spent on each Kakapo alive. I would not want any species to go extinct, but - ouch! - so much on this bird species. However super-cool they are, they do not have the value of human life. Sometimes it's hard to get the right balance.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My daughter and I read many, many books together, but this one has really stuck with us. Perhaps because we had not read anything similar before, but I think it is because it was such an intimate glimpse into an heroic effort to save an animal that is so cute. As a parent, I felt it was an accessible glimpse into the life of a biologist, doing great worth with passion. I hope my daughter some day has the passion of the folks trying to save the Kakapo. My daughter was 8 when we read this and she loved it. The photography was wonderful and you really got a sense of the island and the birds. Highly recommend this one.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The child in me (my wife says that aspect of me never became "inner") was entranced by this book. Nine pound flightless parrots that smell like honey, play peek-a-boo with humans, and growl like puppies? Adult or child, one wants to know more!

In simple, and yes, somewhat childlike language, this book details a story that has happened many thousands of times in recent centuries: A prevalent animal or plant species encounters humans and the animals that accompany us (dogs, cats, rats) and is subsequently reduced to extinction, or near extinction. The beauty and intelligence of the Kakapo make their story more poignant, but no more tragic than countless other similar tales. What is powerful about Kakapo Rescue is the fusion of breath-taking photography and the careful, non-judgmental telling of the impact our human presence has had on other living beings. Young and old readers are invited to contemplate how once thriving species (whales, passenger pigeons, kakapo) can be moved from almost innumerable abundance to catastrophic reduction by human action, AND they are invited to contemplate how dedicated, skillful, and committed humans can begin to undo the harm that has been done. The story of individuals, governments, and corporations banding together to nurture a devastated species toward recovery is powerfully hopeful. Regardless of age, a message of hope sometimes seems more a call to action than repeated and relentless tolling of disaster.

Dr.Suess attempted to tell the story of our human impact on the Earth to children and adults in whimsical form; Kakapo Rescue tells it in stunning photos, simple and accurate prose, and in age-appropriate scientific language. Much as I admire Dr.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Anyone age eight and above who has an interest in birds, conservation, and the out of doors would enjoy this well written and beautifully presented chapter book. The language is simple enough for young readers and sufficiently complex to hold the interest of adults who are interested in nature. The photographs taken by Nic Bishop are beautiful and like all his other books, make you feel as though your there. Author Montgomery and photographer Bishop traveled to the remote islands that are home to the only remaining kakapo; soft, fluffy, moss-green parrots in New Zealand. For ten days Montgomery and Bishop lived with the scientists, technicians, and volunteers working to save these rare and mysterious parrots. Written with warmth, humor, and suspense, "Kakapo Rescue" is truly and amazing read.
1 Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Author Montgomery and photographer Bishop traveled to the remote islands that are home to the only remaining kakapo -- soft, fluffy, sweet-scented (they smell like honey!), moss-green parrots in New Zealand. For ten days Montgomery and Bishop lived with the scientists, technicians, and volunteers working to save these rare and mysterious parrots. Heavy, flightless birds, kakapo nest in underground burrows from which they emerge to forage at night. Once as numerous as the buffalo that roamed the American plains, these defenseless creatures were easy prey when humans brought non-native predators to New Zealand, and by the mid-20th century kakapo were on the brink of extinction. In 1951 only 51 kakapo existed on Earth. As of September 8, 2010, there were 122--thanks to the efforts of New Zealand's National Kakapo Recovery Team. This book's magnificent photographs of exotic long-range vistas and detailed closeups transport the reader to the scenes. Written with warmth, humor, and suspense, "Kakapo Rescue" is highly recommended.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews