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Kandahar

3.6 out of 5 stars 28 customer reviews

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(Sep 11, 2008)
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(Jan 01, 2001)
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Editorial Reviews

Seville Signature Collection. Special Features 16x9 widesreen, Exclusive commentary track by Nelofer Pazira, "Lifting the Veil" documentary, stills gallery, International Trailer, Cast and Director Bios,English/Farsi audio, English or French subtitles, and Bilingual menus.

Product Details

  • Directors: Mohsen Makhmalbaf
  • Producers: and Studio Canal Makhmalbaf Film House. BAC Films
  • Format: Widescreen
  • Subtitles: English, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000067DFL
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #387,161 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 30, 2003
Format: DVD
This is an intriguing film by renowned Iranian director Mosen Makhmalbaf. It is a brief, fascinating peek at Afghanistan under the Taliban regime. Filmed before the September 11, 2001 attack on the World trade Center took place, it offers a tantalizing glimpse into a country in which few of us can imagine living.

The premise of the film revolves around an Afghani woman named Nafas (Niloufar Pazira), who has emigrated to Canada but finds herself returning years later to her homeland after her sister, who had remained behind in Afghanistan, writes her a letter announcing her intention to end her life at the time of the next solar eclipse.
In the film, Nafas is journeying to her sister in Kandahar. She finds her country, a mosaic of ethnic and linguistic communities, totally devastated by two decades of war. It is through her eyes that the viewer sees the extreme views that have overrun her country. It is through her eyes that the viewer sees the tragedy that is Afghanistan.

The viewer sees that education is firmly in the hands of the Mullahs, the local religious leaders who practice and instruct young boys in a strict fundamentalist interpretation of Islam. It is an ideology that is interwoven with a chilling militancy. Despite the extreme views propounded by the Mullahs, mothers struggle to get their boys in these schools, so as to be assured that their sons will get your basic three hots and a cot in this land of famine.

Moreover, the issue of the role of women under such a repressive regime is also looked at. The viewer sees how the women are treated, denied an education, and referred to in collective, pejorative terms (black heads), due to the burkhas they are forced to wear, at all times.
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Format: DVD
I love middle eastern films. So count on me to rarely give a low rating. Most of them are worth the rating.
This movie is about a woman who tries to save her sister before the next eclipse- which is coming very soon. It speaks about her travels through Iran to Afganistan. And believe me she has many trials, but someone always helped her. I am not going to share too much about this movie because I feel it will give it away, but I would recommend the DVD version and NOT the VHS. Why?
There is also autobiogrpahy of the director of this movie who is also the lead actress. It explains why she made this movie in the first place.
However the reason why I give this movie 4 stars and not 5, because I expected a little more. Although, she shows how women must be covered head to toe and there's a scene that shows of a mother who cannot work and is in much grief because of the rules- this is really all we get from what's going on inside of Afganistan. So with that, I am a little disappointed
However the film is beautiful in all respect and I would recommend anyone to see it.
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Format: VHS Tape
Born an Afghani, now a Canadian, Nafas (Niloufar Pazira) receives a letter from her sister who is still living in Afghanistan. Her sister tells Nafas that she can no longer live in the oppressive conditions of their homeland, and she intends to commit suicide on the last eclipse of the 20th century. Nafas journeys to Afghanistan and tries desperately to reach her sister in Kandahar before the day of the eclipse. She carries with her a tape recorder on which she records the details of her journey in hopes that the stories and voices on that tape will give her sister some reason to live. Nafas enters the country through the Iranian border and must rely on the aid of others to lead her to Kandahar. She takes any opportunity she can to get closer to Kandahar and enlists the aid of an itinerant family, a young boy (Sadou Teymouri), an American-born doctor (Hassan Tantai), and a con artist in her struggle to reach her sister before the eclipse.
"Kandahar" is a thoughtful and beautiful film directed by acclaimed Iranian director Mohsen Makmalbaf, but it doesn't have much of a narrative. What we see is a journey more than a story. The film isn't long, but it has a languid pace, which is appropriate for traveling across a desert. Nafas is in a big hurry to reach her sister, so the film's pace also helps us empathize with her frustration. But "Kandahar" doesn't seem to be about Nafas or her sister.
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Format: DVD
A woman sets out to rescue her sister in the Afghan city of Kandahar and along the way meets the displaced persons of war, the refugees, the starving, and the walking wounded. The film focuses in particular on the women and children forced to survive under hostile conditions. Their marginal existence in the desert sands on the border of Iran and Afghanistan reflects their status within the Taliban-ruled country from which they live in exile. Even more dramatically, the film explores the plight of those who have lost limbs from land mines.

Particularly informative is the commentary by actress Nelofer Pazira that is included on the DVD. Her comments reveal in eloquent detail not only the making of the movie (shot where it takes place) but the rationale behind the creative choices made, often on the fly, as the film crew worked under difficult and dangerous conditions. While western news coverage continues to focus on the military and political aspects of warfare in the Middle East, "Kandahar" does much to reveal the devastating impact on noncombatants. Definitely worth seeing.
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