Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 20 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Karate Kid II has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.69
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$7.00
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Amazing Prime Express
Add to Cart
$7.16
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: 1dandy1
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The Karate Kid II

4.4 out of 5 stars 178 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Jul 10, 2001)
"Please retry"
2
$6.59
$3.70 $0.98
DVD
"Please retry"
1
$7.37 $5.98
DVD
"Please retry"
3
$69.00 $61.69
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

Geek Boutique 2016 Geek Boutique HQP

$6.59 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 20 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Karate Kid II
  • +
  • The Karate Kid (Special Edition)
Total price: $11.59
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Returning with Daniel (Ralph Macchio) to his Okinawa home for the first time in 45 years, Miyagi (Noriyuki “Pat” Morita) encounters Yukie (Nobu McCarthy), the woman he left behind when he immigrated to America. And just as Daniel falls in love with her teenage niece Kumiko (Tamlyn Tomita), two enemies arise to challenge both couples’ happiness: Sato (Danny Kamekona), the man whom Yukie was once supposed to marry, and Chozen (Yuji Okumoto), his vicious nephew who’s taken an instant dislike to Daniel. And now, to satisfy their family honor, they’ve challenged Miyagi and Daniel each to a duel, karate matches so brutal, that only the winners shall survive. Features the 1986 Oscar®-nominated song, “Glory of Love.”

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Noriyuki "Pat" Morita, Yuji Okumoto, Ralph Macchio, Martin Kove
  • Directors: John G. Avildsen
  • Producers: Jerry Weintraub
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: French, Portuguese, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Thai, English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Portuguese, Spanish
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
    PLEASE NOTE:
    Some Region 1 DVDs may contain Regional Coding Enhancement (RCE). Some, but not all, of our international customers have had problems playing these enhanced discs on what are called "region-free" DVD players. For more information on RCE, click .
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: July 10, 2001
  • Run Time: 113 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (178 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005JXY3
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #13,361 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Karate Kid II" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. Elmquist on August 26, 2001
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The first Karate Kid literally spoke to any kid who felt out of place and picked on. Strongly enough, it was a concept played out over and over again. But the evenhanded direction of Avildsen made it a triumph. So what do you do for a sequel? You get real. Not that the first one wasn't real. The threat to Daniels safety in the first movie was always there and fully realized. But take this student and mentor pair and send them to Okinawa, and you have a whole different ball game. The story centers more on Miagi and his journey home to see his dying father, and facing demons he left as a young man. Asian culture takes certain things much more seriously. Honor in this movie is a subject brought up constantly, and we see it from Daniels perspective; as an American who does not understand why these people do things they way they do in the name of honor. As Daniel comes to grips with this life code in the small village of Miagi's youth, he realizes that the bully who has targeted him this time does not hold back. He's ready to kill Daniel. He has no qualms about it either and feels it's justified. As Daniel swoons a beautiful Asian girl and finds he's getting in deeper with the affairs of Miagi's past, he holds his ground, and his good upbringing helps to hold his own honor in place. In the end, the climatic fight scene is what really makes the movie. The whole story builds up to that moment. The idea is that this fight is real, there is no competition, no points. This is not a tournament, this is not a spectacle. Daniel is fighting to stay alive. And it is more brutal then the rules laden tournament of the first movie. Morita and Maccio play off each other so well it's obvious these two have great chemistry.Read more ›
Comment 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
You could tell from the ending of the first `Karate Kid' that this was only the beginning of the story. The continuing journey of Daniel LaRusso bursts wide open in 'The Karate Kid Part II' Mr. Miyagi must return to his home land of Okinawa to see his dying father, but he is also well aware that the scars of his past are still there waiting for him after all this time. Daniel learns of Mr. Miyagi's best friend Sato and how Miyagi broke the village tradition to ask for the hand of his best friend's betrothed wife. Daniel learns through his trip that karate is more than tournaments and trophies. He learns that it is about honor and pride. He soon understands that there are people who take honor very seriously that they will stop at nothing seek out the purity of honor if it has been disgraced. That means anything is possible, even a fight to the death. Only through the sacred rules and techniques of the Miyagi family karate can Daniel overcome the tremendous obstacles he will face at this step in his journey.

This movie is one of the fabled sequels that live up to its predecessor. The story is darker and Pat Morita's performance is his best by far. I am surprised that he didn't get nominated a second time for an academy award. The villains are just as evil as the Cobra Kais (who actually make a brief appearance in the film) and the final fight shows that karate is not about fancy moves and glory. The message learned from `Part II' is that when it comes to fighting the most powerful technique is the one that your opponent doesn't see.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
Karate Kid II is not only the best of the series, it is a premier movie of the eighties. In the beginning it was only made to build upon the successful sequel theory, but this film was part of a greater movement; Kid II was instrumental in the popular acceptance of "Eastern" culture. For Asian-American children, it provided a springboard into popular white society and created a mystique and awe about anything Asian. For some, respect grew from the disciplined culture that was eloquently protrayed throughout Kid II. For many others, Asians were again equivocated with martial arts and respected for an element of the eyes. No matter what the initial reasonings for acceptance or respect, it did lead to a general perception that Asian culture was something to be admired and that if cross-bred with American culture, there could be a tremendously successful result. Karate Kid II plays on all the emotions of American capacity and is both sad and inspiring. If an editor chooses to dismiss any piece as only "for kids," then unfortunately his narrow sightedness will never allow him to write an article worth reading. Buy it. Watch it. Take it to heart.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I should be considered an expert on this film but I'm not going to claim it. Right now I'm in Kyoto Japan and I am Japanese-American. So this movie has a very special meaning to me. I saw it when I was very little and loved every minute of it. I was always asking my mom if certain things were correct or if the Japanese was correct.

Albeit now the Japanese Slang is a bit old and the issues are a bit ancient (not to also mention most of the movie was filmed in Pat Morita's home state of Hawaii). This movie still speaks to me.

I like it better than the first and truthfully I think whether it's better or not is just a state of opinion not actual quality. I just think the second one speaks to me more than the first. I wasn't the skinny outcast being picked on in high school.

However, I recommend seeing both the first and second not only because of the messages relayed within about honor, respect, love, and the bond between an aged fisherman and a kid from New Jersey, but also because these movies have some of the greatest one liners ever!

"Daniel-san nobody perfect."

Check them out and see what I mean. Relive the 80's and come back to the depressing reality TV era.

BTW I'm reviewing the Japanese DVD. They just remade all the movies here on DVD for about $15 each. So I'm picking these up.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Karate Kid II
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Karate Kid II


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video