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Kate & Leopold 2001

PG-13 CC
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Meg Ryan and Hugh Jackman come together as star-crossed lovers who discover that passion and chivalry never go out of style. When a rip in time brings together a charming 19th-century bachelor and a 21st-century woman, the potential for an old-fashioned modern romance ignites.

Starring:
Meg Ryan, Hugh Jackman
Runtime:
1 hour, 58 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Fantasy, Romance, Comedy
Director James Mangold
Starring Meg Ryan, Hugh Jackman
Supporting actors Liev Schreiber, Breckin Meyer, Natasha Lyonne, Bradley Whitford, Paxton Whitehead, Spalding Gray, Josh Stamberg, Matthew Sussman, Charlotte Ayanna, Philip Bosco, Andrew Jack, Stan Tracy, Kristen Schaal, William Sanford, Arthur J. Nascarella, Robert Ray Manning Jr., Roma Torre, Viola Davis
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 17, 2001
This is not Meg Ryan's best film, but it is yet another highly enjoyable romantic comedy in the career of one of the most successful light comedy actresses of the past decade. But this could be a breakout film for Hugh Jackman, who is easily one of the most likable and charismatic new actors on the scene today. Easily the best thing about X-MEN was Jackman's portrayal of Wolverine. He has also appeared in SWORDFISH and SOMEONE LIKE YOU, but after seeing this film, he is clearly a very versatile and talented actor, who deserves a lot of chances in a lot of different kinds of films.
The film is enhanced by an excellent supporting cast. Both Liev Schreiber as Meg Ryan's ex-boyfriend and Breckin Meyer as her brother are extremely appealing. But the film either falls or stands on the performances of Ryan and Jackman. This is not, as I mentioned earlier, her best role, but even Meg Ryan at less than her very best is still quite good, and Hugh Jackman is enormously enjoyable. Natasha Lyonne, who I love a lot, was pretty much wasted in her role as Ryan's secretary.
The movie will invariably be compared to other time travel movies. It is a genre that has been more successful in the past than one might imagine, thanks to the BACK TO FUTURE series and the superb TIME AFTER TIME. There are a couple of gigantic holes in the plot (one involves when a particular photograph could have been taken), but overall the film isn't hard to take as sci-fi. I will say that the scenes set in 19th century New York are my favorite parts of the movie. The initial scene takes place at a ceremony in which Washington Roeblings, the engineer who built the Brooklyn Bridge and son of the man who designed it, is dedicating (I think) the completion of the second tower of the bridge. The look and feel is remarkable.
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Format: VHS Tape
Hands down, this romantic comedy is a Hugh Jackman vehicle, as he totally steals the show from Meg Ryan. Jackman plays the role of the Duke of Albany, Leopold Mountbatten, an English nobleman visiting his uncle in New York in 1876. At his uncle's behest, Leopold is to find a rich socialite to marry, so that he may replenish the family's depleted coffers.
While at a ball in his uncle's New York house, awash with rich and eager heiresses, he notices a stranger who had earlier caught his attention. He follows the stranger and finds himself in the year 2001, as he falls through a portal in time. Landing in the apartment of Stuart Besser (Liev Schreiber), the stranger whom he had followed, he soon meets Kate McKay (Meg Ryan), Stuart's former girlfriend of four years and a modern day everywoman. Let the games begin.
What follows is nothing earth shattering. In fact, it is pretty predictable. Leopold and Kate fall in love, though the big question is why, as there is nothing to suggest why they should. Meg Ryan does her usual Meg Ryan thing, though she is starting to get a bit little long in the tooth to be playing the brash, cutesy ingenue. She is, in fact, getting to be quite tiresome in these sorts of roles, as she plays them all exactly the same, making them virtually indistinguishable one from the other. She needs to extend her range, before her adoring public stops adoring her.
Jackman, however, does a star turn with his gently effective and ingratiating portrayal of Leopold. He is simply sensational. Charming, handsome, and warm, with a light British accent that rings true, he is totally believable as a chivalrous gent from another time. Jackman totally upstages Ryan without meaning to do so. It is a good thing that he does.
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Format: DVD
Kate and Leopold is one of those adult fairy tales set in modern times. At least partially so! Director James Mangold chooses to focus not on the story of time travel, as discovered by a
nondescript New Yorker bachelor who travels through a "portal" (Liev Schreiber, apt and amiable), but rather on the romantic events of the Duke he brings back with him to the future.
That Duke, Leopold, as played by Hugh Jackman, has traveled some 130 years in time, from late 19th century New York, where he lived as a titled British transplant, searching for love and wealth...and finding neither. Naturally, in the most serendipitous of ways, he meets Kate (Meg Ryan), a marketing research exec, fiercely career-oriented, but as vulnerable underneath as Meg Ryan was in "Sleepless in Seattle" and "You've Got Mail". Unfortunately, her hairdo leaves something to be desired, and her choice in clothing is mannish and severe, but Ryan's charm makes Jackman's crush believable.
Your surprised that Tom Hanks has been supplanted by Hugh Jackman. Hugh Jackman? Nah...wasn't he a hairy super-hero in X-Men? You'd think he was playing against type until you see his performance here. He's marvelous. Believable, confident, playing this role as Ben Affleck never could, Jackman gets the largest round of applause for making this movie a commercial and DVD success. He's immersed himself in 19th century manners, etiquette and deportment, but is still vulnerable and kind. The movie plays for laughs somewhat, on his introduction to timeless Americana such as ketchup, Tater Tots, and scooping up the dog doo after you walk your monster dog in Manhattan.
If the real market research experts are watching, Affleck, etal., may never win another romantic lead again!
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