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Kindle Touch 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display - includes Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers

4.1 out of 5 stars 9,429 customer reviews
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Technical Details

 
DisplayAmazon's 6" diagonal most advanced E Ink multi-touch display, optimized with proprietary waveform and font technology, 600 x 800 pixel resolution at 167 ppi, 16-level grayscale.
Size (in inches)6.8" x 4.7" x 0.40" (172 mm x 120 mm x 10.1 mm).
Weight7.8 ounces (220 grams).
System RequirementsNone, because it's wireless and doesn't require a computer to download content.
On-device StorageUp to 3,000 books or 4 GB internal (approximately 3 GB available for user content).
Cloud StorageFree cloud storage for all Amazon content
Battery LifeA single charge lasts up to two months with wireless off based upon a half-hour of daily reading time. Keep wireless always on and it lasts for up to 3 weeks. Battery life will vary based on wireless usage, such as shopping the Kindle Store, downloading content, and web browsing (browsing available only in Wi-Fi mode).
Charge TimeFully charges in approximately 4 hours via the included USB 2.0 cable connected to a computer. U.S. power adapter sold separately.
Wi-Fi ConnectivitySupports public and private Wi-Fi networks or hotspots that use the 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11n standard with support for WEP, WPA and WPA2 security using password authentication or or Wi-Fi Protected Setup (WPS); supports WPA and WPA2 secured networks using 802.1X authentication methods using password authentication; does not support connecting to ad-hoc (or peer-to-peer) Wi-Fi networks.
3G ConnectivityHSDPA modem (3G) with a fallback to EDGE/GPRS; utilizes Amazon Whispernet to provide wireless coverage via AT&T's 3G high-speed data network in the U.S. and partner networks outside of the U.S. See Wireless Terms and Conditions.
USB PortUSB 2.0 (micro-B connector)
Audio3.5 mm stereo audio jack, rear-mounted stereo speakers
Content Formats SupportedKindle (AZW), Kindle Format 8 (AZW3), TXT, PDF, Audible (Audible Enhanced(AA,AAX)), MP3, unprotected MOBI, PRC natively; HTML, DOC, DOCX, JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP through conversion.
DocumentationQuick Start Guide (included in box); Kindle User's Guide (pre-installed on device). Additional information available online.
Warranty and Service1-year limited warranty and service included. Optional 2-year Protection Plan available for U.S. customers sold separately. Use of Kindle is subject to the terms found here.
Included in the BoxKindle wireless e-reader, USB 2.0 cable, and Quick Start Guide. Power adapter sold separately.
Kindle Touch e-reader: 6.8" x 4.7" x 0.4"
If you're purchasing a device primarily for reading, an important consideration is the screen technology. Unlike devices with LCD screens, Kindle e-readers use the latest generation of Electronic Ink ("E Ink") technology – E Ink Pearl – designed specifically to deliver clearer, sharper text that makes reading for extended periods of time more comfortable. Here are some of the advantages to reading on an E Ink device:

Reads Like Real Paper, Even in Bright Sunlight
E Ink screens look and read just like real paper. Kindle e-readers' matte screens reflect light like ordinary paper and use no backlighting, so you can read as easily in bright sunlight as in your living room. Unlike LCD screens, E Ink screens have no glare.

Easy on the Eyes
E Ink uses actual ink particles to create crisp, print-like text similar to what you see in a physical book. And Kindle e-readers also use proprietary, hand-built fonts to take advantage of the special characteristics of the ink to make letters appear clear and sharp.
Less eye fatigue: Every time your eye switches from a bright screen to a dimmer, ambient room, your eyes have to adjust, which may result in fatigue. With E Ink, the page is the same brightness as everything else in the room so there's no adjustment needed.

Reduced glare: All E Ink surfaces are treated to be matte like a printed page, reducing glare and increasing legibility.

Read in any position: E Ink screens have a uniform contrast ratio that does not change with your viewing angle, so you can read in any position.

Sharp, clear text: E Ink screens have 100% aperture ratio, so there are no gaps between pixels. The blacks and whites on an E Ink screen are uniform, improving image quality.
Read with One Hand
Ranging from 5.98 ounces to 8.7 ounces, Kindle e-readers are lighter than most paperback books, and weigh half as much as many LCD tablet devices, making it easy and comfortable to hold in one hand for extended periods of time.

Longer Battery Life
Electronic ink screens also have the advantage of significantly lower power consumption than LCD screens. E Ink screens do not require power to maintain a page of text, allowing you to read for up to a month or two on a single charge versus hours on a tablet or smart phone.

Kindle e-Reader Battery Life

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Configuration: Kindle with Special Offers Verified Purchase
I've had my Touch for almost a day now, and it's pretty awesome. I'm not a big reviewer, but I figured several people may be in a similar position as I was yesterday, so here we go...

I'm definitely an avid reader. Actually, as I type this, I have roughly 1000 books sitting on a wall of shelves behind me. E-readers have always intrigued me, but I've never felt like they were worth $199 or more; however, when the Kindle Fire was announced, I thought they had released the Kindle for me.

I watched video reviews, "hands-on" videos, read numerous reviews, etc. I was pretty sure that I wanted a Fire, but as I thought about it, I wasn't convinced that the Fire really provided me with access to anything that I couldn't do on my phone (HTC Inspire 4g). Other than a bigger screen, the Fire was actually pretty limited (for my purposes). I mean, I would only be able to use the browser and watch videos in areas with WiFi (i.e. at home, at work, or at retail location with WiFi). If I'm at home, I'll probably just watch videos on my tv and access the internet on my desktop or my laptop. At work I'm too busy for the Fire to get much use. And other than the occasional trip to Starbucks (and by occasional, I mean like once a month), I don't really make use of hot spots.

SOO...I decided the Fire didn't really justify the extra money for something I already have access to through my phone, laptop/desktop, or tv. This caused me to run the gambit of reviews for the Kindle Touch and the Kindle Keyboard. Best Buy was advertising the Kindle Keyboard 3G (with ads) for $89, so price wasn't really a distinguishing feature for me.
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Configuration: Kindle with Special Offers Verified Purchase
UPDATE October 2012: This device is now discontinued, and I would strongly recommend the Kindle Paperwhite over it if given the option.

For my review, I'm going to focus it on the differences between the previous Kindle Keyboard, Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display - includes Special Offers & Sponsored Screensavers (which I'll refer to as the K3), and the Kindle Touch (KT)

USE - As far as the reading experience, I really like the touch compared to the physical buttons on the previous generation. At first I was worried that I would constantly be turning the page from accidentally touching the screen, but this didn't become much of an issue. The screen is broken up into mapped sections, so if you touch the far left side that covers about 1" of the left of the screen, it goes to the previous page. If you touch anywhere on the other 80% of the screen beside that, it goes forward. Touch the top 1" margin, and it will bring up the menu. There is also a physical button on the bottom of the touch that serves as the Home button and will take you straight to the Home menu. The area where I found the touch most useful is the dictionary. Previously, if I wanted to look up the definition of a word, I had to use the clunky joystick to navigate through the text. If a word was at the very bottom at the end of the sentence, sometimes I'd usually just ignore it rather than go through the trouble of pressing that joystick 15 times. With the Touch, I can simply touch the word and hold it down for about 1.
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Configuration: Kindle with Special Offers Verified Purchase
The Touch just joined out 'old' third generation Kindle (my own), the new a 4th generation Kindle and, since yesterday, the Fire - we are a 3 kids household so the more, the merrier :)

We like the Touch and, more importantly, our 9th grader son is extremely happy with it because, while as good a reader as the other 2, he's more of a smart phone/tablet user person and he prefers interacting directly with the screen rather than pushing buttons.

We all like the new Kindles mainly because they are smaller and lighter and because I wasn't using the keyboard much on my 3d gen anyway so the extra body required by the physical keyboard wasn't justified. I am still keeping my existing Kindle 3 because a family of 5 can use quite a few Kindles but I welcome the new keyboardless designs for the reason I stated above.

KINDLE TOUCH vs. KINDLE (4th gen) vs. KINDLE KEYBOARD (3d gen) - which one to pick?

It's not a 'who wins' context, really. Anyone who is a passive reader (like me) should welcome the new models because they are smaller and lighter but with the same screen size. Those who annotate a lot should probably get the 'keyboard'.

I find the text equally sharp on all three models but graphics appear to be more crisp on K3. Page turns... They're fast enough for me on all. Battery life was never a concern on Kindles. With Wi-Fi off they keep going for weeks. The Touch is as battery efficient as the other models.

And, speaking of 'charge', the new (keyboardless) Kindles comes without a dedicated charger. It's no big deal because you can always charge it off a computer or use just about any generic USB charger or you can buy Amazon's branded charger separately but it would have been nice if one was included.
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