Facebook Twitter Pinterest
19 used from $54.66

Trade in your item
Get up to a $15.00
Gift Card.

Kindle Keyboard 3G, Free 3G + Wi-Fi, 6" E Ink Display

4.4 out of 5 stars 43,374 customer reviews
| 214 answered questions

Available from these sellers.
  • 3G + Wifi
  • 6" E Ink Display
19 used from $54.66


Technical Details

kindle image
Included in the box
  • Kindle wireless reader
  • U.S. power adapter
    (supports 100V-240V)
  • USB 2.0 cable
    (for connection to the Kindle power adapter or to connect to a computer.)
DisplayAmazon's 6" diagonal electronic paper display, optimized with proprietary waveform and font technology, 600 x 800 pixel resolution at 167 ppi, 16-level gray scale.
Size (in inches) 7.5" x 4.8" x 0.335" (190 mm x 123 mm x 8.5 mm).
Weight8.7 ounces (247 grams).
System RequirementsNone, because it's wireless and doesn't require a computer. Check wireless coverage.
Storage4GB internal (approximately 3GB available for user content).
Battery LifeA single charge lasts for up to two months with wireless off based upon a half-hour of daily reading time. If you read for one hour a day, you will get battery life of up to one month.
Keep wireless always on and it lasts for up to 10 days. Battery life will vary based on wireless usage, such as shopping the Kindle Store, web browsing, and downloading content. In low-coverage areas or in EDGE/GPRS-only coverage, wireless usage will consume battery power more quickly.
Charge TimeFully charges in approximately 4.5 hours via the included U.S. power adapter. Also supports charging from your computer via the included USB 2.0 cable.
3G ConnectivityHSPDA modem (3G) with a fallback to EDGE/GPRS; utilizes Amazon Whispernet to provide wireless coverage via AT&T's 3G high-speed data network in the U.S. and partner networks outside of the U.S. See Wireless Terms and Conditions.
Wi-Fi ConnectivitySupports public and private Wi-Fi networks or hotspots that use the 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11n (in b or g compatibility mode) standard with support for WEP, WPA and WPA2 security using password authentication; does not connect to WPA and WPA2 secured networks using 802.1X authentication methods; does not support connecting to ad-hoc (or peer-to-peer) Wi-Fi networks.
USB PortUSB 2.0 (micro-B connector) for connection to the Kindle U.S. power adapter or optionally to connect to a PC or Macintosh computer.
Audio3.5 mm stereo audio jack, rear-mounted stereo speakers.
Content Formats SupportedKindle (AZW), TXT, PDF, Audible (Audible Enhanced (AA, AAX)), MP3, unprotected MOBI, PRC natively; HTML, DOC, JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP through conversion.
Included AccessoriesU.S. power adapter (supports 100V-240V), USB 2.0 cable, rechargeable battery.
DocumentationQuick Start Guide (included in box) [PDF]; Kindle User's Guide (pre-installed on device) [PDF]. Additional information in multiple languages available online.
Warranty and Service1-year limited warranty and service included. Optional 2-year Extended Warranty available for U.S. customers sold separately. Use of Kindle is subject to the Kindle License Agreement and Terms of Use.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Ron Cronovich TOP 1000 REVIEWER on August 28, 2010
Verified Purchase
UPDATE NOVEMBER 2011:

My review is now over a year old, as is the "Kindle Keyboard" as Amazon calls it now. There are newer models: the basic, cheapie Kindle and the Kindle Touch, and of course the Kindle Fire quasi-tablet.

Each of these models is an excellent choice. Whichever one is right for you just depends on your preferences.

The 3 e-ink Kindles are Kindle Keyboard (this one), Kindle Touch (the newest "flagship" model), and the basic Kindle. All 3 of them have EXACTLY THE SAME 6" DISPLAY, with the same sharp typeface and high contrast that reads like ink on paper with no eyestrain. The Kindle Keyboard is the oldest of these models, and I got one of the first ones when they came out in August 2010.

I still absolutely LOVE my Kindle Keyboard and use it almost every day. I have read dozens of books on it. I like the newer models, they have some neat features, but the experience of reading a book on them is no better or worse than on my 1-year-old Kindle Keyboard. Page turns are now smoother and faster on the newest Kindles, but the difference is not enough to make it worth the cost of upgrading, in my opinion.

The touch-screen interface of the Kindle Touch is pretty neat. But, unlike my iPad, I only use my Kindle to read books, and reading books is just as nice on any of the current Kindle models. I don't consider the touch screen a "must have" feature, and I'm normally obsessed with having the latest version of every tech product I own.

For that reason, I think the cheapest Kindle is an excellent choice.
Read more ›
1,121 Comments 31,874 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
The Kindle is my first e-ink reader. I own an iPad, an iPhone, and have owned a Windows-based phone in the past that I used as an ereader.

My overall impression of the device is good.

The good:
I'd honestly rather read linear (read from page one to the end, one page at a time) fiction from it than a book, because I can't always get comfortable with a book. Hardcovers are sometimes a bit heavy, and paperbacks don't always lie open easily. The Kindle is incredibly light and thin. I can hold it in one hand easily. The page turn buttons are conveniently located. Page-turns aren't instant, but they're probably quicker than turning a physical page in a printed book (there are just a lot more page-turns unless you choose a small font). The contrast is better than other ereaders I've seen. There is zero eye strain in good light. My eyesight isn't the greatest and I like being able to increase the font size and read without glasses. I love being able to browse the Kindle store and read samples before deciding to purchase. The "experimental" browser is surprisingly usable, but isn't great. It is useful for browsing wikipedia and blogs. The biggest drawback to the browser is the awkward pointer navigation, using the 5-way pad. It syncs your furthest read page over the internet so you can pick up where you left off using your iPhone or iPad.

The so-so:
The kindle store could use more categories and sorting options. You can't sort by "top rated," and there is no category for "alternate histories," for example. Finding a very-specific type of fiction relies on keyword searches, which don't do a great job. The wifi sometimes doesn't connect before it times-out.
Read more ›
204 Comments 11,972 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Verified Purchase
I'm a first-time Kindle owner, so I have nothing to "compare" the latest Kindle to. I don't own a Nook. I don't own an iPad (and, in any case, that's comparing apples to oranges). I don't have a Sony e-reader. '

This will be a short, simple review.

I received my Kindle about a week ago and haven't been able to put it down.

Things I like about my Kindle?
1. The e-ink display is amazing.
2. Using the 5-way controller is simple and effective.
3. Page turn speeds are faster than I thought they would be.
4. It's lightweight, even with the attached cover (I have an Amazon cover with a built-in light)
5. Page-turning buttons are quiet and well-placed.
6. Recharge time is fast.
7. I can order a book and start reading it in less than 60 seconds. Nice!
8. Portability... I can take 3,000 books with me when I travel for work and not require additional suitcases or baggage fees.

Things I'm not too keen on?
1. Buttons are too close together and are laid out oddly.
2. Lack of individual number buttons is frustrating.
3. Power button on the bottom? Not a bad thing. Just an odd thing. (Same for the headphone input). I usually rest the "bottom" of a book on my lap when I read.

Things I hope change in the future?
1. How books are organized... When I put a book in a collection (which is actually a "tag"), it still appears in the main list. It's not actually "moved", it's merely associated.
2. The look of the main screen. I'd like "folders" or some other way to display "collections".
3. Ability to create personal "screen savers."
4. E-book pricing, though Amazon has little control over this. Still, most titles are the same price as or less than their hardback/paperback counterparts.
Read more ›
37 Comments 3,123 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews