Kindle Price: $3.99

Save $10.96 (73%)

Unlimited reading. Over 1 million titles. Learn more
Read for Free
with Kindle Unlimited
OR

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

A King of Infinite Space (Long Beach Homicide Book 1) by [Dilts, Tyler]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

A King of Infinite Space (Long Beach Homicide Book 1) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 684 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$3.99

Length: 276 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $3.49 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready
Matchbook Price: $0.99 What's this?
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.

Kindle Email Subscriptions
click to open popover

Complete Series

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Exclusive: Tyler Dilts on A King of Infinite Space

When I began writing A King of Infinite Space, I was in graduate school earning an MFA in fiction writing. As is the case in many such programs, there was a good deal of autobiographical introspection in the writing going on around me, and that was the last thing I wanted to do. I wanted to do something different. One of the main reasons I've always loved reading is that it takes me away from myself and allows me to experience the lives of other people. What, I asked myself, could I credibly write about that was very different from my own experience?

My father was a Los Angeles deputy sheriff, and throughout most of my youth, I wanted to be a police officer. Although my career goals changed, I was left with a considerable amount of background knowledge that I felt I could put to good use. And it didn't hurt that my favorite writers included the likes of James Lee Burke and Michael Connelly. It was settled, I thought. I'll write a police procedural--I know enough about it (with a fair amount of research thrown in) to sound authoritative, and what could be further from an English grad student’s personal experience than a story about investigating homicides?

I did decide to allow myself one autobiographical detail. My father died when I was very young, and I decided to have Danny Beckett, the novel's protagonist, share this experience. It would, I thought, give the two of us a bit of common ground and help me relate to the character.

As the writing and rewriting progressed, I felt a reassuring sense of distance from Danny, a sort of critical perspective that thought allowed me to shape and hone the character with a studied and intellectual reserve that seemed properly authorial and intellectual.

So it came as quite a surprise when the novel was finished and my friends and family began to read it. Danny sounds just like you, they said. I refused to accept this, so I interrogated them. One by one they pointed out details and ideas and jokes and phrases that they'd heard from me, usually more than once. And a few of those closest to me commented on the similarity between Danny's and my voices and perspectives. Eventually, I had to admit they were right.

But it was only recently, when I had occasion to look through an old family photo album and saw a picture of myself at age four, around the time of my father’s death. I wore a clip-on tie, a makeshift shoulder holster complete with cap gun, and an expression befitting the most serious of detectives. It was me I was looking at, but I couldn’t help thinking it might just as well have been Danny Beckett.


From Booklist

We meet Detective Danny Beckett mixing himself another screwdriver, but it's a bit of a feint—though he occasionally indulges, Danny is a remarkably sober protagonist. In fact, it's this quality of quiet practicality that helps him solve a grisly crime: a young schoolteacher hacked to death in her own classroom and robbed of her left hand. "The vic," as the task force calls her, had no real enemies, and this allows Dilts—a talented and understated new crime writer—to flex his slow-burn, first-person narrative. Danny and his partner, Jen, turn up a surprising number of credible suspects (including a Russian mobster, an abusive father, and an Internet date), but even when characters turn out to be red herrings, Dilts plumbs them for all they're worth in terms of fleshing out the psyches of Danny and Jen—who is, by the way, another arresting character, a dutiful martial-arts enthusiast who betrays just a flicker of attraction for her partner. This is tense, intelligent, and observant writing; here's hoping Dilts doesn't leave this duo hanging. --Daniel Kraus

Product Details

  • File Size: 2903 KB
  • Print Length: 276 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (June 29, 2010)
  • Publication Date: June 29, 2010
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00395ZYY0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,482 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Alicia Adams on June 18, 2009
Format: Paperback
Tyler Dilts has created a masterpiece with his debut detective novel, A King of Infinite Space. Set in Long Beach, California, Detective Danny Beckett and Jen Tanaka must solve the case of a brutally-murdered English teacher. Through painful mastery of image, dream, characterization, and story telling, Tyler Dilts excels at showing the effects that murder cases have on the detectives investigating them. Using sadness as a measure for goodness, Dilts explores characters in a way that is true, whole, and touches deep down into the reality of a person. I highly recommend A King of Infinite Space not only to anyone who loves reading mystery novels but to anyone who can empathize with pain, loss, and the haunting quality of dreams.
1 Comment 77 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
'A King of Infinite Space' may have Shakespearean pretensions in its title, but in actuality it's a pleasant, quick-reading cop thriller set in sunny Long Beach. With a ramshackle cast of quip-happy characters led by a troubled (of course) detective, the author does an efficient job of winding up his story of a murdered, beloved teacher to a nice nail-biting pitch. I rather wish we'd learned more about the LBC underbelly - the city is, after all, a weird balance between wealthy beachfront and the worst gang activity in Los Angeles - but it was good enough to entertain me on a cross-country flight. It was certainly the best AmazonEncore book I've read!
Comment 73 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
A King of Infinite Space by Tyler Dilts

This is Tyler Dilts' debut novel featuring homicide detectives Danny Beckett and Jen Tanaka.
The novel opens with the vicious death of a high school teacher. Not only is there a murder to be solved, but Dilts peels away the layers of his lead protagonist, Danny Beckett. Still tormented by the death of his wife, we get an inside look at Beckett and what motivates him.
Not only was the murder mystery engaging but the relationship between the detectives and the whole department was something I hadn't read before and it was refreshing. It was what pulled me into the story and kept me there.
Even though I could tell "who done it" before the ending, I enjoyed the ride and was really taken with the characters because Dilts personalizes them and makes them real, interesting and more than what meets the eye.
I am looking forward to reading the next book in the Beckett series.
Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It has been my experience that the mystery genre and all of its corresponding sub-genres, even in what seems to be a relatively progressive present, still suffer from the stigma of being considered somehow less "literary" than other works. I'm hard pressed to say exactly what this means, but whenever the claim is made or even implied I find it is derived, at least partially, from the assumption that genre fiction is more of a distraction from than a response to/direct treatment of the "weightier" issues of the human condition. Tyler Dilts' book effectively discredits such a conviction by presenting us with realistic, compelling characters whose depth and intelligent execution resonate powerfully with the reader from the first page; later, it is not frilly formulaic convention which carries the story along, but the natural evolution of the charactrs and situation, which in turn leads to the powerful realization that the world Dilts has created is not so very different from our own--is closer to it, in fact, than the countless epic sagas of the trials and tribulations of wounded upper-middle class family dynamics faux-literary snobbery would have us accept as more accurate treatments of the implications of life in contemporary society.
Comment 50 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really wanted to enjoy this book, I'm a long-time fan of "hard-boiled" detective mysteries and haven't read a great one in a while. Unfortunately this book didn't cut it. Every character is a cardboard stereotype, from the "detective marred by tragedy drinking alone", to the "beautiful Asian martial arts expert partner", and the "loving teacher victim", "angry, jealous lesbian","cold-blooded Russian hitman", "rich, spoiled teenager", etc., etc. None of the suspects had any real believability, or really any motive. There were no twists and no passion as if the author was simply following an outline of "How to Write a Detective Novel". I guess I'll keep looking and hope Lawrence Block comes out with a new one.
4 Comments 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Last time I read a great fiction from the Vine was Daemon. This book doesn't come anywhere near it. I gave it a chance of reading it almost to the end of the first chapter, but really got bored of it, maybe with the exception of a statement made that among the Texas Rangers there is a "Mexican-American quota". If true, that might have made a more interesting story. In the age of CSI, the TV show, I think we've all come to expect greater sophistication and professionalism in a crime scene than how this story purports that profession to be.

But the writing is rather clear and crisp; I'll give the author that.

On a more interesting note, I noticed the overwhelming criticism a fellow Vine reviewer has received reviewing this book. His rebuttal against the harsh comments has won my vote. Amazon reviews are important. I make most of my purchasing decisions after having at least looked at Amazon first. If there is a movement in falsely increasing the rating of a product like some financial firms seem to do with their cohorts, understand that reviews are reviewed as well.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

A King of Infinite Space (Long Beach Homicide Book 1)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: A King of Infinite Space (Long Beach Homicide Book 1)