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The Kingdom and the Glory: For a Theological Genealogy of Economy and Government (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics) by [Agamben, Giorgio]
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Length: 326 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled Page Flip: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

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"Agamben's argument is complex, multifaceted, and comprehensive, and, indeed, it offers a useful model His method is a philosophical archaeology that joins philosophy and philology in seeking those moments in history in which concepts are formulated or significantly altered and then order subsequent modes of discourse and thought with long term ramifications for human society."—Kelly C. MacPhail, Topia

About the Author

Giorgio Agamben, an Italian philosopher and political theorist, teaches at the IUAV University in Venice and holds the Baruch Spinoza Chair at the European Graduate School. His most recent works available in English translation from Stanford University Press include "What is an Apparatus?" and Other Essays (2009), Nudities (2010), and The Sacrament of Language(2011).

Product Details

  • File Size: 982 KB
  • Print Length: 326 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0804760160
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press (September 13, 2011)
  • Publication Date: September 13, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005PRJQRG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #428,851 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Format: Paperback
In his Metaphysics, R. G. Collingwood calls the Trinity the absolute presupposition of the West. In Capital, Karl Marx rails against the dark Trinity of land, labor and capital as a secular displacement of its theological source.
Long out of philosophical fashion, Agamben blends these two insights. He returns to the key of the Trinity to unlock, in the vocabulary of Michel Foucault, current global economic governmentality. That Agamben evokes the Trinity as the origin of the problem is unsurprising but, unlike Foucault, who can see only oppression in the Christian tradition, Agamben opens a speculative window onto the radically liberationist side of the `economic' Trinity. I highly recommend this book, not only as a masterpiece by one of Europe's leading political thinkers, but as an overdue reconsideration of the potentialities of Trinitarian thought, tracing its lineage deep and long in the West.
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Format: Paperback
This book is an essential complement to Homo Sacer which now, in retrospect, is clearly unfinished business. If Homo Sacer is about sovereign power, then Kingdom and the Glory represents a theory of the full articulation of power due to governance. Power indeed is revealed here as the economic articulation of Sovereignty (common auctoritas) and governance (proper potestas).
The observation that power is split between absolute rule and governmental, popular complicity is not new. But the revelation that all politics is held in the inoperative economy between the two is THE political statement of our age. This is an explosive masterpiece of political philosophy masquerading as work of theological philology. It forms a major part of a trinity of recent works by Agamben which justify all the attention his work. Along with Signature of All Things and Sacrament of Language the Agambenian critique of the metaphysics of difference is complete: power, metaphysics, language. An immense achievement grounded in systematic philosophical deduction and faultless philological induction.
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Format: Paperback
Of the many things that can be said about the work of Giorgio Agamben, being lazy with his research isn't one of them. In fact, I imagine that if by some freak accident, all our sources regarding ancient and medieval theology were somehow lost to fire, one could, with a bit of extrapolation, reconstruct it all again just using Agamben's corpus of works. And if that really did come to pass, The Kingdom and the Glory - encyclopaedic as it is in its scope and its grasp - would be the go-to book from which to begin. Ostensibly a book about the theological roots of modern government, Agamben's actual procedure takes place by way of a meticulous - almost pedantic - tracing of the way in which theologians from Polycarp to Aquinas attempted to answer the age old chestnut: just how does God - who is supposed to be transcendent and removed from the world - go about governing that very world? Or, to put it in Agamben's preferred idiom, how does the Kingdom relate to the Government?

Agamben's answer - or at least the answer he finds in theology - is: by way of an economy. 'Economy' here understood not in the modern, narrow sense of 'distribution of goods', but in the wider sense of 'organization' and 'administration' (Agamben pretty much always uses the Greek spelling, 'oikonomia', to mark the difference). Central to the book's narrative then, is that the Christian doctrine of the trinity, in which God is at once unified and triune, and whose relations are organized by a divine oikonomia, is - in its formal functioning at least - at the core of today's apparatuses of modern government - including, perhaps especially so, democratic government.
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