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The King's Speech [Blu-ray]

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,987 customer reviews

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(Apr 19, 2011)
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Editorial Reviews

After the death of his father King George V (Michael Gambon) and the scandalous abdication of King Edward VIII (Guy Pearce), Bertie (Colin Firth) who has suffered from a debilitating speech impediment all his life, is suddenly crowned King George VI of England. With his country on the brink of war and in desperate need of a leader, his wife, Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter), the future Queen Mother, arranges for her husband to see an eccentric speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush). After a rough start, the two delve into an unorthodox course of treatment and eventually form an unbreakable bond. With the support of Logue, his family, his government and Winston Churchill (Timothy Spall), the King will overcome his stammer and deliver a radio-address that inspires his people and unites them in battle. Based on the true story of King George VI, "The King's Speech" follows the Royal Monarch's quest to find his voice.

Special Features

Audio Commentary, Making Of Featurette, Deleted Scenes

Product Details

  • Actors: Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush, Guy Pearce
  • Directors: Tom Hooper
  • Writers: David Seidler
  • Producers: Iain Canning, Emile Sherman, Gareth Unwin
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Studio: The Weinstein Company/Anchor Bay Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: April 19, 2011
  • Run Time: 119 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,987 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B003UESJHE
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #28,613 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The King's Speech [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
There always seems to come a time in every British actors career where they must play the role of a historical British monarch. Riding on the success of his career defining performance in "A Single Man" and sampling the glory of Best Actor nominations across the award circuits, Colin Firth comes storming back with another film, determined, this time, to take the all the prizes with him too. But is "The King's Speech" worth its pre-Oscar hype?
Set across the years between the First and Second World War, "The King's Speech" concentrates on the rise of King George VI (Firth) and his personal woes, including his infamous stammer and disdain for public speaking. Obviously being royalty, having an ability to engage the public in moving and inspirational speeches tends to be a necessity of the job. In attempting to overcome this disability, he's entrusted in the care of the eccentric and flamboyant speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush).
Over the course of the film, the two men of distinctly different social classes come to blows but ultimately forge a friendship which will last a lifetime.
Colin Firth's portrayal of George VI (or simply Bertie to his family and friends) was a fascinating insight into the king's troubled personal life. His tragic inability to speak, both in public and to his family, was also tender and, in a way, heart-warmingly humbling.
While Firth will deservedly get the plaudits for his regal starring role, it was Geoffrey Rush's witty, genuine, off-the-wall performance as Logue which personally blew me away, with immense comic timing and inability to be overwhelmed while in the presence of his most prestigious client.
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Format: DVD
This isn't just another period piece or costume drama. It's a slice of history with a very real problem that many people deal with: stammering or stuttering. In this case, it's King George VI of England. He takes over after his brother abdicates the throne. George's problem is public speaking, and imagine just how hard it would have been for someone who had to make many broadcasts during his reign. He gets help from speech therapist Lionel Logue and from his loving wife as well.

Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, and Helena Bonham Carter are at their best here as the three main characters. The interplay between Firth and Rush is especially moving to watch. The two men end up becoming close friends, not just a king and his subject/therapist.

Excellent and highly recommended.
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Format: DVD
THE KING'S SPEECH is one of those rare films that rely on the brilliance of the actors to bring a story/screenplay alive. But the success of this extraordinary film does not stop there. This re-telling of history as written by David Seidler and as directed with enormous sensitivity by Tom Hooper, as captured on film by cinematographer Danny Cohen glows as a background for some of the finest acting before the public today.

The film opens in 1925 as King George V (Michael Gambon) is beginning to fail, leaving the heir apparent to the throne at the time of his death to be Edward VIII (Guy Pearce), a man more concerned with love with the twice divorced Wallis Simpson (Eve Best) than he is with the Royal Lineage. Once the now senile George V dies, Edward VIII takes the throne but soon abdicates to marry Wallis. This passes the throne to the tender but severely stammering Prince Albert (Colin Firth), a man terrified of facing his beloved countrymen because of his speech defect - a defect that his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) has encouraged him to correct through a series of speech doctors. Elizabeth hears of Australian émigré Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush), a poor wannabe actor who gained his knowledge for correcting speech defects teaching returning WW I victims in Australia. Prince Albert (Bertie) and Logue meet and begin therapy by Logue's tough rules before Albert takes the throne. Through a series of rigorous exercises and lessons Logue helps the Prince learn to speak, finally accompanying him to the throne as a speech therapist and giving Bertie (now known as King George VI) the courage and strength to rise to the occasion of leading England through WW II.
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Format: DVD
Earlier this year when I started hearing raves about "The King's Speech" on the film festival circuit, I knew it was a film for me. I have eagerly awaited its arrival for many months and, as expected, it is a dignified and well scripted effort. Intelligent, adult entertainment of this sort only hits the theaters around awards time and there is no denying that "The King's Speech" is positioning itself perfectly for the year's biggest competition. In an unusual bit of bravado, David Seidler's screenplay is fashioned as a feel good underdog story. Yes, that's right--King George VI is a plucky survivor who must overcome adversity to win the respect of his family and his nation. It's an unusual tactic, really, but I think that's why so many people are responding to "The King's Speech" in a more personal way than past stories of regal history. The film humanizes this world leader in a very identifiable way.

The plotting of "The King's Speech" is pretty straightforward and most people will know the principle story through either history or the film's advertising. Colin Firth plays King George VI who battled with a bad stutter for most of his life. Trying to stay out of the spotlight, Firth has never worried about ascending to the throne as he has an older brother (Guy Pearce) who is in line for that distinction. However, Pearce ends up being more concerned with an inappropriate romance than with ruling a nation. Firth's wife (Helena Bonham Carter), meanwhile, has contracted an unusual speech therapist (Geoffrey Rush) that breaks all the rules. Insisting on equality with the future King, Rush and Firth form a tentative friendship. But as Firth takes his place in the monarchy just as World War II is imminent, he must unite the nation with his inaugural radio speech.
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