& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
In Stock.
Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Know What I Mean? (Remast... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$10.82
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Amazon.com
Add to Cart
$14.14
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: IMS Distribution
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Know What I Mean? (Remastered) Import

4.7 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all 26 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, Import, August 1, 2006
"Please retry"
$10.48
$6.16 $2.80

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.
$10.48 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details In Stock. Sold by skyvo-direct-usa and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Know What I Mean? (Remastered)
  • +
  • Elephunk (w/Bonus Track)
  • +
  • Wildflowers
Total price: $23.86
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Know What I Mean? (Remastered) by Cannonball Adderley

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
5:12
Listen Now $1.29
 
2
30
6:14
Listen Now $1.29
 
3
30
5:55
Listen Now $0.99
 
4
30
5:55
Listen Now $0.99
 
5
30
2:52
Listen Now $1.29
 
6
30
Toy
Toy
5:06
Listen Now $1.29
 
7
30
5:50
Listen Now $1.29
 
8
30
4:05
Listen Now $1.29
 
9
30
4:53
Listen Now $1.29
 
10
30
7:01
Album Only

Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 1, 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Concord Records
  • Run Time: 53 minutes
  • ASIN: B000000Y68
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #82,502 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By George H. Soule on March 29, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Despite being overshadowed by the musical reputation of John Coltrane, Cannonball never needs apologies or justification, and this is a superb example of his playing. On this recording, Adderly's lyrical sound and masterful technique are at their best. His music is lightly lyrical and it swings hard, but it always seems to have (dare I say it?) joy at its base. This fine jazz album was created by two musicians who participated with Coltrane in the sessions for Miles Davis' famous "Kind of Blue" album. Cannonball Adderly is the alto saxophone player on that album and Bill Evans is the pianist. Reunited here, it's obvious that they respect and enjoy one another's music, and the album--recorded over a three month period in 1961--reflects their mutual comfort. The songs include Evans' "Waltz for Debbie," now a 3/4 time jazz standard, and the title track "Know What I Mean?" Evans is joined by half of the Modern Jazz Quartet--Percy Heath on bass and the always-appropriate Connie Kay on drums to complete the rhythm trio. They provide solid support for Cannonball throughout the album. As I noted, Cannonball is ebullient throughout, and Evans' superb solos and his prescient interplay with Adderly make this album a must have jazz recording.
The leisurely solos on Gordon Jenkins' "Goodbye" and Earl Zindars' "Elsa" and Silver's "Nancy" exemplify Evans and Adderly at their best as balladeers. Adderly's treatment of Gershwin's "Who Cares?" is infectiously bright, lightly lyrical, and Kay and Heath forcefully drive the rhythm. Evans' solos on the two takes typify his harmonic inventiveness, no small matter in any musical universe.
Read more ›
Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This collaboration between two highly intelligent and creative musicians should be in every jazz CD collection, and should be ranked up there with the 'Ah Ums' and 'Blue Trains'. Evans and Adderley clearly loved each other's playing and it shows in every note. I wish they had recorded more together. Both were at the peak of their powers in 1961 and recent graduates of the great Miles Davis Sextet of 1958-9 which some reckon the best jazz combo ever. I never get bored of this record. Evans is often accused of lacking a hard swing and even of not playing jazz at all. This record is the most eloquent counter to that argument there could be - Evans swings every bit as hard as the swinging and funky Adderley, playing great jazz before fashion and the desire to make a buck pushed the great altoist off in a different direction. BUY IT TODAY!!
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
It's 1961, and for recording sessions in January, February and March producer Orrin Keepnews has snagged Cannonball, one of the five best saxophone players of the era; Bill Evans, one of the five best pianists, and the team of Connie Kay and Percy Heath, fully half of one of the five best jazz ensembles, the Modern Jazz Quartet. So the bass and drums are in superior hands, and the lead instruments are in superstar hands. A decision is made to create a record for the Riverside label, at the time a decent-size player in the jazz business along with Prestige and Blue Note and Verve and the majors. Further decisions are to record two Bill Evans compositions, a tune by the Gershwins, one by John Lewis, pianist/leader of the MJQ, one by jazzman Clifford Jordan, and one by Gordon Jenkins, one of the most popular orchestra leaders for recordings in that time frame. The parties agreed that the project would be mostly mellow, but with a swinging foundation. The whole recipe worked perfectly, and now, 40 years later, we have this current release with two bonus tracks, alternate takes of two of the eight original selections. They turn out to be almost as good as the ones first chosen for the vinyl LP. From the first notes by Evans of his own tune "Waltz for Debbie" to the closing notes on the alternate take of "Know What I Mean?" this disc is a delight. If you like Adderley or Evans at all, grab this document attesting to how beautifully they worked together once. This one is somewhat hard to find, but worth the searching. Beautiful music that will never go out of style and is far more than background sound deserves to be in your home. You don't have to be a jazz fan to like it. Somehow this project has drawn less attention from critics and fans than it deserves. I love it.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This relaxing and thoroughly unforgettable album brings together the high-spirited Cannonball Adderley and pianist Bill Evans, who had both worked with Miles Davis just two years earlier, along with the Modern Jazz Quartet rhythm section of Percy Heath and Connie Kay. The juxtaposition of these two jazz giants and their contrasting styles, seems to have brought out some of the best playing from both of them. Evans is heavily featured in intros and outros, as well as with his reprertoire staples "Elsa" and his well-known "Waltz For Debby". His playing here is enthralling, exuberant and melodic, being spurred on by Cannon's warmth, and his bouncy improvised melodies on the more up tunes, aided by and the cozy charm and accompaniment of Heath and Kay.
This is indeed one of those rarest of sessions -- every track is a gem, and almost all of the solos are without a doubt inspired. For professional musicians, these would be ideal for study transcriptions in the improvisational art of jazz. Cannonball's sweet treatments of Gordon Jenkins' poignant "Goodbye" and Frank Sinatra's gorgeous "Nancy" display a ballad artistry not always emphasized in contemporary writings about the artist; often invoking a Benny Carter approach. Bill Evans, (sharing almost equal billing with Cannon on the album cover) was perhaps at his first creative peak here in 1961, and is far more than a sideman: he makes every note count, and consice statements flow from his sensual, yet never maudlin piano. His playing on Earl Zindars' beautiful waltz "Elsa" rivals the many other versions he did over the years, as he shapes and carefully hones every phrase. That "inner conviction" he often spoke about in interviews, is most apparent here, and again on "Nancy.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Know What I Mean? (Remastered)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Know What I Mean? (Remastered)



Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: vinyl pop