Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Labor of Job: The Bib... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Fine. Paperback. 2002. Originally published at $21.95.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (New Slant: Religion, Politics, Ontology) Paperback – November 24, 2009

5.0 out of 5 stars 1 customer review

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.95
$6.67 $0.99

The Numberlys Best Books of the Year So Far
$21.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (New Slant: Religion, Politics, Ontology)
  • +
  • The Terror of God: Attar, Job and the Metaphysical Revolt
  • +
  • On Job: God-Talk and the Suffering of the Innocent
Total price: $54.13
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Antonio Negri takes the ideas he developed in reading Spinoza, the Jewish heretic, and brings them to bear on one of the most crucial texts of orthodox Christianity to show how much unrealized potential for radical change persists even within those theoretical formations that seem the most monolithic and reactionary. Negri’s approach prefigures efforts by philosophers such as Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, and Giorgio Agamben to re-read the history of Christian thought against the grain. It also connects to and explicates the language of Christian asceticism that informs Empire.”— Timothy S. Murphy, coeditor of The Philosophy of Antonio Negri and editor and translator of Antonio Negri’s Subversive Spinoza


“Job regards God, according to Negri, not as judge or father or even as the source of discipline and mediation, but merely as antagonist, the locus of an empty, unjust command. There is no more question of measure—equating sins and punishment or virtues and rewards—that could support a conception of divine justice. But Job is not powerless. . . . According to Negri’s reading he stands before God angry, indignant, unrepentant, and rebellious.”—from the foreword by Michael Hardt, co-author, with Antonio Negri, of Empire and Multitude


“The book of Job is the first (and, in many ways, still unsurpassed) exemplary case of the critique of ideology, teaching us how to resist legitimizing our misfortunes with any kind of ‘deeper meaning’––and who is more suitable to actualize this book for our times as Antoni Negri? In his hands, The book of Job turns into a revolutionary text, into a true manual of resistance.”—Slavoj Žižek

From the Publisher

"Antonio Negri takes the ideas he developed in reading Spinoza, the Jewish heretic, and brings them to bear on one of the most crucial texts of orthodox Christianity to show how much unrealized potential for radical change persists even within those theoretical formations that seem the most monolithic and reactionary. Negri's approach prefigures efforts by philosophers such as Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, and Giorgio Agamben to re-read the history of Christian thought against the grain. It also connects to and explicates the language of Christian asceticism that informs Empire."--Timothy S. Murphy, coeditor of The Philosophy of Antonio Negri and editor and translator of Antonio Negri's Subversive Spinoza

"Job regards God, according to Negri, not as judge or father or even as the source of discipline and mediation, but merely as antagonist, the locus of an empty, unjust command. There is no more question of measure--equating sins and punishment or virtues and rewards--that could support a conception of divine justice. But Job is not powerless. . . . According to Negri's reading he stands before God angry, indignant, unrepentant, and rebellious."--from the foreword by Michael Hardt, co-author, with Antonio Negri, of Empire and Multitude

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: New Slant: Religion, Politics, Ontology
  • Paperback: 168 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (November 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822346346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822346340
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,064,381 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I discovered this book after reading 123 books on the Book of Job. I expected the author to view the Biblical text through the lens of the world of economics, but instead he views the world of economics through the lens of scripture. I have read a lot of Marxist literary criticism but this is the first Marxist literary critic that writes: "If you do not have a Bible at home, go out and buy one!" Negri is an accomplished critic and I soon discovered that his translator knew more English words than I did (but only four). Like every "scientific" Marxist he requires measure-ability and repeat-ability in any theory. The first few verses of Eliphaz' first speech offer the familiar Gilbert and Sullivan measure for retributive justice; "Oh, the crime must fit the punishment and the punishment fit the crime." He goes on the show that Job is 'Everyman' and that Job's discourse shows that the measure of retributive justice is broken and cannot be repaired. Job's only hope is redemption and likewise the only hope for modern working man is redemption, since his measure of social and economic justice is broken an not repairable as well. An excellent read!
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (New Slant: Religion, Politics, Ontology)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Labor of Job: The Biblical Text as a Parable of Human Labor (New Slant: Religion, Politics, Ontology)
Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: exegesis