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Lacey and His Friends Paperback – October 1, 1986

4.3 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 299 pages
  • Publisher: Baen; Reissue edition (October 1, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671655930
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671655938
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 4 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,133,940 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jeffrey Morris on August 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Lacey and His Friends is a Drake anthology of five shorts he wrote from 1977 to 1981 for Analog (still issued by puzzle magazine purveyor Dell Publications) and Destinies (defunct, published by Baen from 1980-1989). The book contains three Lacey stories and two unrelated time traveler yarns.

It was released straight to paperback in 1986 after Drake had found a hit in his Hammer's Slammers series of space mercenary novels/anthologies (1979, Hammer's Slammers; 1984, Cross the Stars; and 1985, At Any Price). Drake wasn't the first to capitalize on the space age diaspora mercenary idea (see H. Beam Piper's 1963 classic Space Viking or Piper contemporary Poul Anderson's Polesotechnic League series released between 1958 [The Man Who Counts] and 1978 [The Earth Book of Stormgate]), but he was the first to successfully inject the gritty realities of combat experience of the Vietnam War into modern science fiction. The chirpy and idealistic 1950s style of Robert Heinlein's military sci-fi had overstayed its welcome by 1980, so the reading public was more than ready for Drake's style of anti-hero.

Nation Without Walls is the first in the lineup and sets the background of the Lacey trilogy. The United States is a dystopian future of energy shortage-driven poverty and crime that is counterbalanced by near constant surveillance and recording of every individual. Vaguely similar to the Phillip K. Dick 1956 classic The Minority Report (and adapted by Spielberg on the big screen in 2002), obvious criminals are taken out by a "red team" dispatched by the omnipresent computers that are watching all.
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By A Customer on April 12, 1997
Format: Paperback
Drake tells us himself in the forward to this set of short stories that they were written in a dark period. Boy, I'll say! Lacy is totally ruthless. Drake does a fine job of inventing crimes in a near future where every action is recorded by the omnipresent camera. Lacey goes after his quarry with a bulldog-like determination that is riveting to read. Lacey is a semi-rehabilitated rapist made cop, who operates according to his own wierd moral sense. If you've read any of Andrew Vachs' Burke novels, you won't want to miss this. Oh yea, the, AND HIS FRIENDS, in the title refers to a couple of light fluff stories added at the end
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Format: Paperback
Now this is a book of the distopian future, combine elements of Gunn With Occaisional Music, 1984, and A Clockwork Orange... Add one VERY hardboiled cop and you get one hell of a collection of stories. Drake combines historical events, a bleak future, and some bleak insights into humanity into an amazing journey. Not to be missed.
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Format: Paperback
This set of dark tales about a grim "detective" solving crimes in a bleak oppressive future is truly Drake's best work.
Lacey is a humorless, merciless "rehabilitated" rapist turned investigator who uses the all-seeing surveillance systems of the future to stalk his prey. Along the way he also gains some small measure of revenge against "Big Brother" for the mental emasculation that constituted his rehabilitation. It's too bad that none of Drake's other works come close to matching this level of intensity. Everything else I've read by Drake seems tepid and lame by comparison. Read it. Only 3 stars 'cause there are some really weak non-Lacey stories included to fluff up the word count.
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