Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $5.75 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Lark Rise to Candleford: ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Great condition, just hints of wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy Paperback – March 1, 2010

4.4 out of 5 stars 192 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.20
$5.96 $1.03

Pierced by the Sun
A gripping tale of murder and redemption by the author of Like Water for Chocolate. Learn More
$13.20 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy
  • +
  • Lark Rise to Candleford: The Complete Collection
Total price: $132.00
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

Our literature has no finer remembrancer . . . no observer so genuinely endearing. --John Fowles, New Statesman

Flora Thompson's great memoir of her Oxfordshire girlhood [is] a model of the form. The richness of the language, the lingering over detail and incident creates a haunting classic. --The New York Times

From the Inside Flap

This is the story of three closely-related Oxfordshire communities, a hamlet, a village, and a town, and the memorable cast of characters who people them. Based on her own experiences as a child and young woman, it is keenly observed and beautifully narrated, quiet and evocative.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 556 pages
  • Publisher: David R. Godine; First Godine Edition edition (March 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567923631
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567923636
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.7 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (192 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #83,518 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book provides an easily readable, well-written account of English rural life in the late 1800s, before this culture was forever changed by industrialization. The author was a young girl whose simple adventures are described, and she does have an eye for the details of country life that provides a charming portrait of that life. Oxford University Press was the original publisher of this trilogy, and the quality of the book justified the publisher's faith. The author observes that although people didn't have as many material goods as today, and although they worked very hard, they seemed happier than their descendents. For example, she describes the system of assistance in the community among its different classes and members when there was no welfare state.
Perhaps because I discovered this book through an article in "Victoria" magazine in the 1990s--before the BBC made a television series out of it--I did not miss the absence of a storyline or plot. This is a beautiful book when it is taken on its own terms. If you enjoy Miss Read's novels of English village life, you will probably appreciate this book's loving depiction of country life at an earlier time. I think the inspiration of Miss Read and Flora Thompson is the same.
2 Comments 145 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I am so glad this book is still in print. It is one of my very favorites, and I read it at least once per year, like Huckleberry Finn. For those of us who love nature, and tales of growing up in the out-of-doors, this is a beautiful book of the natural world and agricultural lands. It contains wonderful sketches about farm life in the turn-of-the century English countryside, school life, and village characters. This book reminds me of Cider With Rosie (also called The Edge of Day) by Laurie Lee, another excellent book about growing up in England, set around the time of WWI. This is truly worthwhile reading. If you have read "Lark Rise to Candleford" and enjoyed it, another book by Flora Thompson, "Still Glides the Stream", deals with the same subject matter and is also very good.
Comment 64 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have completed the first book in the trilogy, and though I agree with another reviewer that it has the same kind of feel as the "Little House on the Prairie" and "Anne of Green Gables" series' (all of which I love), I don't think I would put this in the same age range as either. The "Little House" series was something my friends and I read starting in elementary school, and my daughters did the same. The "Anne" books were more junior high to high school, and we have enjoyed them as adults as well. Though Thompson's books have the same rural, homey feel to them, I think the lack of an ever-present storyline would make them less appealing to the average youth today who is used to instant gratification and constant entertainment (I know I am generalizing). I'm sure there are some youth that would love them, but they are much more an insightful, descriptive look at country life with stories scattered here and there and I believe they will appeal more to adults. I find them fascinating and I think the people who used these books as a basis for the PBS series have done a brilliant job of creating a consistent storyline from the threads of narrative Thompson has woven together. If you have watched the series and loved it, don't approach the books as "the script" for what you have seen. View it more as background material and enjoy a deeper look into what made the people who they are. If you have read the books and are just considering seeing the series, don't expect to see what you have read. They are both wonderful examples of their own art form. Let each stand alone and appreciate them for what they are.

ETA: I have now completed the book and have seen all four seasons of the PBS series.
Read more ›
Comment 68 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I borrowed this book from the library. I love the illustrations, which very much enhance the story. The author reminisces about the way things were in the English countryside in the 1880's. Her accounts and descriptions might be simple, of everyday tasks that we don't think much about, but i really enjoyed learning about these details.
The book i read, the "Illustrated" version, is an abrigment of the thre volumes. The editors say at the end that the abridgment was done mostly to avoid repetition, which exists in the three books so that they can be read independently of each other.
Comment 62 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As the previous customer review notes, "Lark Rise to Candleford" fully details life in, alternately, an English hamlet (Lark Rise), a village and a town (Candleford) at the turn of the 20th C. And, as with the prior review, the book is invariably described as a fond recollection of a bygone, uncomplicated era. I value it, though, for the opposite reason, that by describing agricultural life of the last century so accurately and dispassionately, it unintentionally shows such life to be overwhelmingly impoverished, bare and humdrum. In several passages, the author Flora Thompson scolds herself for making the hamlet and village sound so unremittingly dull. Ironically, her protests only underscore the reality of daily existence. One of her most telling observations is about the rarity of drunkenness in Lark Rise, not, as one might infer, because of a higher moral standard, but because no one could afford more than a glass of beer at a sitting. At another point, she describes without editorial the death of noblesse oblige and the resulting hand-to-mouth poverty, unbroken by one-time manor-sponsored holidays and fetes, that accompanied the transition from tenant to wage farming in the latter half of the 19th century. The ultimate strength of this book for me, therefore, is its reminder that, for so many Western people, these really are the good, old days.
Comment 81 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Lark Rise to Candleford: A Trilogy

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: classic literature, classics literature