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The Last Metro (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]

4.3 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

François Truffaut s first feature is also his most personal. Told through the eyes of Truffaut s cinematic counterpart, Antoine Doinel (Jean-Pierre Léaud), The 400 Blows sensitively re-creates the trials of Truffaut s own difficult childhood, unsentimentally portraying aloof parents, oppressive teachers, and petty crime. The film marked Truffaut s passage from leading critic to trailblazing auteur of the French New Wave.

BLU-RAY SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES:
New, restored high-definition digital transfer, with an uncompressed monaural soundtrack
Two audio commentaries: one by cinema professor Brian Stonehill and another by François Truffaut s lifelong friend Robert Lachenay
Rare audition footage of Jean-Pierre Léaud, Patrick Auffay, and Richard Kanayan
Newsreel footage of Léaud in Cannes for the showing of The 400 Blows
Excerpt from a TV program in which Truffaut discusses his youth, his critical writings, and the origins of Antoine
TV interview with Truffaut about the global reception of The 400 Blows and his own critical impression of the film
Theatrical trailer
PLUS: An essay by film scholar Annette Insdorf

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Catherine Deneuve, Gérard Depardieu, Jean Poiret, Andréa Ferréol, Paulette Dubost
  • Directors: François Truffaut
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Color, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: The Criterion Collection
  • DVD Release Date: June 1, 2010
  • Run Time: 131 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001O549F2
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #96,113 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Last Metro (The Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. L. Diamond on September 24, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
One of Truffaut's and Deneuve's best pictures. It has warmth, history, a sense of the absurd, excellent pacing, and a bit of suspense. It's also has more a linear storyline then many French films. All of the performances are excellent.
Two Warnings:
1. Avoid dubbed versions (Deneuve's sense of humor is in her voice, not on her face, resulting in a mirthless character when dubbed).
2. The new Fox version changed the sub-titles and wrecked some of the best lines.
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Format: DVD
This is a first-class romantic, suspensful and humane movie. The Germans have occupied Paris and there are informers everywhere. Marion Steiner (Catherine Deneuve), a famous actress, has taken over the management of the theater her husband, Lucas Steiner, an equally famous director, has left. Steiner is a Jew and disappeared shortly after the Germans took over. For the next production Marion Steiner hires a young actor, Bernard Granger (Gerard Depardieu), who loves women and who gradually comes to love Marion.

There are secrets everywhere. Lucas Steiner is hiding and living in the basement of the theater, protected by his wife. He directs the new play through notes to his wife and discussions in the late evening when she visits him. Granger is an member of the resistance who could bring disaster to the theater if he is caught. Marion Steiner is devoted to her husband, but feelings for Granger slowly begin to appear, and are not unnoticed by her husband. All the while life in Paris under the Nazis goes on, the play is prepared and rehearsed, Jewish members of the company are protected or caught or flee. An odious, collaborating journalist and theater reviewer uses his contacts and influence to try to arrange a relationship with Marion. Eventually Bernard leaves the theater for active fighting.

This is something of a romantic movie of choices. At the end of the movie, the Germans are fleeing Paris. Bernard has returned and a new play starring Marion and Bernard is a great success. Lucas is spotted by the audience at the rear of a box and they stand to applaud him. Bernard and Marion bring him to the stage to join them in receiving the ovation for the play. Then Marion moves between the two men, holds their hands, and the three of them stand smiling while the applause roars on.
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Format: DVD
I was first drawn to this film when I read a news article that this film had been considered by many French critics to be the best French film of the 80's. I couldn't have agreed more with that judgment when I saw it. Truffaut goes beyond telling a story of love and tragedy in Nazi-occupied France, it shows how intensely he feels about art and theater and how inseparable they are from human life. Theater is a big part in the lives of the central characters and hence a key ingredient of this film as well. Truffaut uses that fictional theater and interweaves that with real lives so seamlessly that it sometimes blows your mind away. I think in many ways it is an extension of 'Day for Night'. A terrific achievement, to say the least.
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By A Customer on April 19, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
During the nazi occupation of Paris, when missing the last metro meant a long and dangerous night on the streets, everyone must play a part. There are great sub-plots related to freedom and tyranny, but the star is Deneuve. This is her best role, and she has had many great ones. Here, she is an actress who cannot betray her love for the leading man, Depardieu, to her playwright husband in hiding who "directs" by what he hears. Great dramatic tension, great performances, and a great illustration (or a parable) of the realities that are created by drama. Maltin is obtuse when he says the movie, especially the finale, is pointless. The end is entirely fitting and pleasant, although startling. The war is won, the subterfuge can be abandoned, and the protagonists in the drama continue to create and order reality.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Francois Truffaut's deeply-insightful and historically resonant film ruminating on the covert efforts of a Paris theater-troupe evading (and resisting) the nightmarishly cruel regime of WWII Vichy-France = during the dark epoch when that WWII-era French regime acted as agent for the Third Reich and pro-fascist-Axis powers and implemented anti-Semitic edicts meant to remove Jewish participation/ influence from nearly all aspects of European culture and especially the creative-arts: theater/ writing/ film/ Music, etc.

Although taking-place within the backdrop of consequential European WWII history, the dramatic power of this film emanates from Truffaut's masterful ability to present the above resistance-struggle in very intimate/ human terms ==> focusing on a single Theater in Paris, whose Jewish Director Lucas Steiner (played by Heinz Bennent) is forced to 'disappear' while his gentile wife Marion Steiner (portrayed by the Legendary and sublimely-beautiful Catherine Deneuve) takes-over operation of the Theater (running day-to-day business as usual, hiring new actors, dealing with the Vichy 'censors' and fascist-leaning Daxiat, etc.) The other intriguing dramatic-element the viewers are made aware of early-on is that Marion is covertly 'hiding' her husband Lucas in a tiny/ dingy/ dark basement below the Theater, where he can still have a degree of artistic input and even give limited stage 'direction' by means of hand-written notes, etc.

Onto the scene comes Bernard Granger (played by the renowned Gérard Depardieu) who seeks work at the Montmartre-Theater at a time when there is a shortage of talented lead-thespians, but Marion feels that Bernard has the skills & charisma it takes to be the Lead in a new production and enthusiastically signs him on.
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