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The Last Narco: Inside the Hunt for El Chapo, the World's Most-Wanted Drug Lord MP3 CD – Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged

4.0 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Courageous, gritty, and gripping." ---Publishers Weekly

About the Author

Malcolm Beith, a writer based in Mexico City, has covered the drug war for Newsweek and has contributed to Foreign Policy, World Politics Review, and Jane's Intelligence Weekly.

John Allen Nelson's critically acclaimed roles on television's 24 and Vanished are among the highlights of his twenty-five-plus years as an actor, screenwriter, and film producer. As a narrator, he won an AudioFile Earphones Award for his reading of Zoo Story by Thomas French.
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Product Details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (September 7, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400168953
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400168958
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,745,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Desiring to learn about the drug wars in Mexico, I bought this book somewhat as a blind shot in the dark. Like most blind shots in the dark, it missed the mark.

THE LAST NARCO refers to Joaquin Guzman Loera, a/k/a El Chapo. (Actually, the title seems to be somewhat misleading; while Chapo may be the last operating "El Jefe de jefes" ("Boss of bosses") still at large, if "narco" is given its common meaning of someone associated with the drug trade, clearly there are tens of thousands of narcos, with the number growing daily.) "Forbes" Magazine has listed Chapo both as one of the richest people in the world and one of the most powerful. Chapo is the book's centerpiece, around which Malcolm Beith, a British journalist, reports on the rampant drug trafficking, the narcos, the corruption, and the murder and mayhem over the last quarter century in Mexico.

By and large, the book is anecdotal. From time to time Beith wanders into the realms of analysis and policy, but never in sustained fashion or with particular enlightenment. What, one might wonder, has been the role of the United States? Beith mentions, more or less in passing, its role as the overriding market demand for the drugs coming out of and through Mexico (Ross Perot's sucking sound heading the opposite direction). From several of his anecdotes, one might speculate that U.S. intervention at both the levels of law enforcement and national diplomacy has affected - perhaps for good or perhaps for ill - Mexico's handling of its drug problem, but the matter is not really discussed. Beith also mentions, again without in-depth discussion, that the U.S. is the major supplier (perhaps as high as 90%) of the firearms used by Mexico's drug cartels and their sicarios (killers).
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed reading this book, partly because even tough I live in Mexico, the web of names is just endless, PGR, AFI, different ranks in the mafia, so basically I finally understood all the relationships. Of course all the comments, and events that the author describes on his book are very familiar in Mexico, so anyone from Mexico, would easily identify this from the news and have his own opinion on the matter.

Even tough the author is (in my opinion) sometimes impartial, he did a lot of emphasis on the network of corruption in Mexico because the drug is moved from Colombia to the states. If so, how come he never questioned the integrity of the USA, because all those TONS for cocaine and mariguana, that cross in San Diego, Nogales, El Paso, etc... are not magically appearing on New York, Boston, etc... are they?

I do recommend this book, is a pretty good lecture, and it helps to better understand that underworld.
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Format: Hardcover
I've been following what it's happening in Mexico with all the violence and the struggles for power, and this was the 1st book I read about it. I must say that it was very entertaining and I learned quite a lot about the history of "narcotrafico" and El Chapo Guzman. I enjoyed this book, and it inspired me to keep reading other books about this topic.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Now that El Chapo has been caught (for a 2nd time), there will no doubt be some people who come to Amazon looking for a book about him and the cartels in Mexico. Beth's book is a good lightweight introduction to a very complex issue. Crucial history is touched on throughout the entire book, but unfortunately - due to the deaths of so many journalists and people on the right side of the law, it addition to folklore surrounding narcos - there is so little accurate information to build a completely comprehensive account. The 3-Star rating pertains more to the fact that I've read several books about this topic prior to undertaking "The Last Narco." If you have never read a book about the cartels in Mexico, this might be a 4-Star or 5-Star to you.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
To be honest I don't know what happens to El Chapo, as after numerous attempts to continue the journey in Malcom Beith's book, I simply can't imagine that its a fate worse than willingly being bludgeoned by the author. This is a spectacularly bad book with neither a consistent narrative nor any real effort to structure any semblance of a story line. To simply call it lazy journalism would do a disservice to lazy journalists the world over. This book instead is an ambitious and aggressive realization of the butchery of language and the successful marketing of half-assery in the pursuit of what is undoubtedly a compelling subject. Lets all hope that El Chapo is not a man of letters as I imagine even greater umbrage may be taken.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It's impossible to follow current events without hearing about the violence carried out by Mexican drug cartels, but info on the cartels themselves can be (understandably) tough to come by. The Last Narco represents a massively useful, hopelessly compulsive page-turner; it's impossible to read without learning a whole lot.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
El Chapo is a very intriguing person. He is a friend to his people and they seem to stand behind him, but the question is - how do they explain the violence and loss of lives? Being in Mazatlan on the day El Chapo was captured, makes his story all the more interesting.
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