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The Last Night at the Ritz (Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries) by [Savage, Elizabeth]
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The Last Night at the Ritz (Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries) Kindle Edition

3.4 out of 5 stars 101 customer reviews

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Length: 212 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Elizabeth Savage was the acclaimed author of numerous novels, including The Girls of the Five Great Valleys, Summer of Pride, But Not for Love, A Fall of Angels, and Happy Ending. She lived in Maine and was married to the novelist Thomas Savage. She died in 1989.

Nancy Pearl is a librarian and lifelong reader. She regularly comments on books on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition. Her books include 2003’s Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment and Reason, 2005’s More Book Lust: 1,000 New Reading Recommendations for Every Mood, Moment and Reason; Book Crush: For Kids and Teens: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Interest, published in 2007, and 2010’s Book Lust To Go: Recommended Reading for Travelers, Vagabonds, and Dreamers. Among her many awards and honors are the 2011 Librarian of the Year Award from Library Journal; the 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association; the 2010 Margaret E. Monroe Award from the Reference and Users Services Association of the American Library Association; and the 2004 Women's National Book Association Award, given to "a living American woman who …has done meritorious work in the world of books beyond the duties or responsibilities of her profession or occupation."


Product Details

  • File Size: 599 KB
  • Print Length: 212 pages
  • Publisher: AmazonEncore (October 2, 2012)
  • Publication Date: October 2, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007IWF6FW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #277,561 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By KasaC VINE VOICE on September 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
"There is no knowledge like the bitter knowledge of old loves." This sentence, appearing early in the novel, pretty much sums it up. The unnamed narrator has had a complicated relationship with her "best friend" Gay since they first met in college 30 years before. Their story is told in interior monologue formed of reminisces and flashbacks over the course of a day in which the two women meet at the Ritz in Boston, but this is a tricky novel and all is not as it first appears. As revelations develop, we realize our narrator is not being entirely truthful with either us or herself. Thanks to Nancy Pearl for resuscitating this fine book which is far from dated, reads more like a time capsule. Two eras are beautifully rendered, that of the college days of the two leading ladies, and their world 30 years following that and their take on the encroachment of a younger, freer generation with bare feet and peace symbols embroidered on their butts. This is a wonderful novel of manners of that transitional time, beautifully written with memorable lines including my favorite: "It is very dangerous to get caught without something to read."
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Elizabeth Savage wrote and published her novel, "The Last Night at the Ritz" in 1973, which is a fact worth noting when reading it today. It has been reissued as part of the "Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries" series. Events in the early 1970's to which Savage alludes are as much at a "remove" from the reader as the feelings that are expressed by the unnamed narrator to those events. "Ritz" is a cool book on the surface with a fair amount going on with the characters. Unfortunately, I couldn't establish a lot of connection with the characters, and their problems left me somewhat cold. Now, that doesn't mean "Ritz" is a bad book; it isn't at all. It's just a little like reading a book about the natives of some Pacific Island; you close the book after finishing it and say, "oh, that was interesting". And then go on with your day.

The main characters - two former college roommates at an unnamed coed college in Maine - meet up in Boston for a visit. The "unnamed narrator" - who I will refer to as "UN" - has a tangled past with her roommate and the roommate's husband of 30 or so years. They all attended college together in the late 1930's and the husband, like many of his contemporaries went into service in WW2. He came back to a bride and a job in the publishing industry in Boston. They had two sons together, who, by the early 1970's were part of that disaffected generation - my generation - tangling with the societal mores of the time, as well as the ever-present Vietnam War draft. The sons of Gay and Len were a tangential - but important - part of the story because their lives affected those of their parents.

The narrator, Gay, Len, and several others - (including an old lover of the "UN") drink. They drink a lot. That was fairly common in that generation.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I'm a big fan of Nancy Pearl and her Book Lust series. I've never been disappointed by her recommendations. I especially loved another in the Book Lust Rediscoveries series - After Life by Rhian Ellis. But this one took some warming up to. Initially, I thought that was due to the fact that it was written years ago and during the era in which it's placed, I was too young to have the same mindset as the unnamed narrator and her genteel friends, Gay, her husband Len and several other peripheral characters, past and present. But I continued to read because the writing style is so delightfully unusual, you are drawn into the stories -- and indeed, there are many stories and reminiscences -- and the writing is truly unique. There are many disturbing events in the book and shockers abound but the narrator is the type who rolls with the punches and that keeps the reader's attention. This book won't be everyone's cup of tea but it should be experienced because it unnerves you and isn't that the true test of great literature? That you should feel something you've not felt before? The narrator and the author think so, and now I do, too.
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Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Last Night at the Ritz (Nancy Pearl's Book Lust Rediscoveries) is a novel that deserves to be read. All great novels are misunderstood in their own time, and some long after that. This book is so unique, and yet it follows in the tradition of great American novels. There are some things that make this book inaccessible, and some things that could be criticized. But none of those things should overshadow what an achievement this is. And if these superlatives seem overly dramatic, let me put an exclamation mark on them: I really enjoyed reading this book. We have Nancy Pearl to thank for bringing this book back into the light.

In many ways, the experience of reading this book reminded me very much of The Sun Also Rises. We follow a group of old friends whose lunch reunion at the Boston Ritz turns into a marathon as they go from drinks to dinner and beyond. At moments, Edward Albee's classic Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? comes to mind. No, alcohol does not always bring out the best in people.

The narrator is unnamed, but that is not without precedent in literature. Many of the most pleasurable moments of reading this book come from the narrator's acerbic wit. Her observations are sometimes cringe worthy, sometimes wise but almost always amusing. She is like a self-effacing female version of Lord Henry from The Picture of Dorian Gray.
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