Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $5.08 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 12 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Late George Apley has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very good condition. Pages are clean and free from markings and highlighting. Cover is in good shape with slight wear & tear due to storage & handling & possibly small creases. Ships direct from Amazon!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Late George Apley Paperback – March 9, 2004

4.7 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all 49 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.92
$6.89 $1.80
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$2.54

The Numberlys Best Books of the Year So Far
$10.92 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 12 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Late George Apley
  • +
  • Wickford Point
Total price: $22.11
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John P. Marquand (18931960) wrote several widely admired and bestselling novels, among them the Pulitzer Prizewinning The Late George Apley (1937), Wickford Point (1939), and H. M. Pullham, Esquire (1941). He was the author also of the highly successful series of Mr. Moto detective novels.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books; Reprint edition (March 9, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316735671
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316735674
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #584,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
John P. Marquand probably was one of the most successful authors of his day and this book, for which he won a Pulitzer prize was the start of his brilliant career. Unfortunately, with Marquand's death in 1960, he fell from favor with the academy who was itself enamoured with tales of life in a university and stories addressing issues of gender and sex. Marquand's stories about middle aged WASPs in Boston coping with trying to come to grips with their lives were no longer in fashion and sadly have not returned to the center place that they previously occupied.
This is a novel about manners and invokes the particular time and place of the WASP ascendency in America, just before the second World War. Marquand's hero is a representative of what used to be known as a "Boston Brahmin." Marquand handles Apley with a mixture of bemusement and foundness. He has clearly met George Apley's in his life and knows the type well. What would have been in less capable hands a mere characture, becomes a full portrait of what was at the time, a dying breed. Marquand sensed this and this provides the point of departure for the book.
"The Late George Apley is a bit of a pastische of privately printed books designed to memorialize a dearly departed loved one. This allows Marquand to use his frequently used flashback technique to describe the particulars of Apley's life. At times this provides Marquand with the opportunity to indulge in both high comedy and low drama, as is the case when Apley falls in love with a girl who is both Irish and Catholic. Although this enables some satire on the subject of the way Boston's elite viewed the Irish, it is also a source of regret that Apley, like so many characters in Marquand's books, did not make a different choice in life. Sentiments that as Jonathan Yardley has observed "are not just limited to the denizens of Backbay or Harvard Square."
2 Comments 39 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This novel by Marquand won the 1938 Pulitzer Prize in fiction. In this book, a writer named Willing, an old friend of George Apley, is requested by Apley's son John to collect all of the late Apley's correspondence and use them to form a biography. Although Willing is using them to eulogize Apley and to describe the life of upper-class Bostonians, the reader feels pity at the waste of a life and how a man's class and upbringing can quelch his own desires and thoughts. The book is an excellent example of the use of understatement. However, I am shocked to discover that this fairly well known Pulitzer Prize winner is out-of-print. Surely this is the publisher's fault.
Comment 24 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
J.P. Marquand was well known in his day, both as a serious writer(The Late George Apley won a Pulitzer Prize) and for the Mr. Moto detective series (made into movies starring Peter Lorre as the title character). This novel makes skillful use of the device of the unreliable narrator; it is told from the point of view of a writer putting together a life of Apley who, like his subject, is thoroughly conventional, and thus does not realize that his portrait of Apley reveals the sterility of the latter's life. The novel is also a skillful depiction of a particular class in a particular place and time. I agree with the other reviewers that it is a shame that it is out of print.
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For the first 25 or so pages of this wonderful novel, I didn't know what to expect. In truth, I felt a little negative. Why was I reading a book about a man who seemed to be a fusty Boston Brahmin? As much as I love Boston, I don't have much patience with those for whom Harvard (and certain clubs, and the Athenaeum, and so on) are the center of the universe. And they were certainly at the center of George Apley's universe.

As I read on, I was hooked, despite myself, on the story of this upright and well-meaning man for whom a rich life, at least as he comes to understand it, seems always just out of reach. Marquand narrates the story through the use of fictional letters by Apley's family members and friends (along with his replies). This technique lends a quality of delicate formality to the "biography," as if one were reading one of those old books whose pages must be cut. Not only are the man and the world he inhabited lost to us, but also the very way in which men and women of his time expressed their thoughts and hopes.

Its twin is William Dean Howells' "The Rise of Silas Lapham." This is a tale of a man from the provinces (Vermont, then) who makes a fortune in paint manufacturing and comes to take his place among the wealthy inhabitants of Gilded Age Boston. One can imagine Lapham and Apley meeting in some velvet-draped drawing room, and one can imagine as well their mutual incomprehension. The seemingly crass new world that Apley deplores is the sphere of Lapham; the snobberies and fingerbowls that so confuse Lapham is the sphere of Apley.

Both of these novels give great pleasure and desire a wider readership.

M. Feldman
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
--one of my favorite fictional characters. Everything you have read about Proper Bostonians is true. George was born with a silver spoon and three strikes against him. He wasn't to grow; he was to be molded. He wasn't to feel; he was to behave. He wasn't to love; he was to honor. That he somehow managed to do all of these things makes him a shining hero.
Marquand uses a brilliant narrative device using two voices: the ever-so-proper Bostonian diarist and George's black sheep son. The two frequently write each other disputing the type of memoir to be written about George. You grow very fond of both these completely different narrators.
This is one of my all-time-favorite novels. Reading it once is not enough
1 Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Late George Apley
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Late George Apley