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Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don't Audible – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 583 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 8 hours and 10 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Audible.com Release Date: January 7, 2014
  • Whispersync for Voice: Ready
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HQ3K34M
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Srikumar S. Rao VINE VOICE on January 7, 2014
Format: Hardcover
There are many books on Leadership that have little to say. Sinek's book has both new insights and an inspiring vision.

Sinek begins with biology and outlines the roles of chemicals - specifically Endorphins, Dopamine, Serotonin and Oxytocin - and how evolution has dictated why we generate them and how we respond to them. Endorphins mask pain and help give you a `runner's high' or the intense satisfaction after a tough work out.

Dopamine leads to your `feeling good' upon accomplishing a goal whether that is bringing home dinner while evading sabre-toothed tigers or doing a bang-up job on a major presentation. Think of endorphins and Dopamine as the `individual achievement' chemicals. We need them to excel at what we do.

Serotonin is what gives you a feeling of gratitude and affection for the persons who supported you in your endeavors and the good feeling as they applaud you. Oxytocin is `love' chemical. It gives you the warm fuzzies you get when you hug someone or have a deep meaningful conversation. Think of Serotonin and Oxytocin as the `social' chemicals.

We, as humans, need both the individual achievement and social chemicals to progress. What has happened, unfortunately, in our society is that mores and values have changed to emphasize the former to such an extent that a deadly imbalance has been created. It is truly toxic - your job may be killing you. I used to think this was hyperbole but Sinek presents enough evidence for me to revise this opinion.

Central to Sinek's arguments is the `Circle of Safety'. When a sabre-toothed tiger attacks a herd of buffalos they gather together with their tails touching and horns out. Whichever direction that tiger attacks, it is met with impenetrable defense. This is the circle of safety.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I previously read "Start With Why" and really enjoyed it. That book helped to completely reframe the way I viewed business and the big picture. I was very excited to get a chance to read this book. Initially, I thought it would give a fuller explaination of how the Marines create greater sensitivity in their leaders. In a way, it did this although actually, the book was much more of a scientific study on the chemistry of management. I think it's interesting how Simon related biological chemicals that we all have to better management. The concept of a Circle of Safety and treating each employee as if you are their second parent is also interesting. I think in particular the end of the book where Simon talks about how the current generation feels entitled to quick success is very enlightening and very true. The ultimate point of the book is that if a leader watches out for their people and commits their whole organization to serve others and each other, everyone wins. It's easier said than done, but it's a very good reminder of the importance of going beyond just chasing financial gain.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really tried to give this book a higher rating but just couldn't. While I can't quibble with anything Sinek says, he says nothing that hasn't been said by dozens of other authors. The point of his book: Leaders need to care for others, protect them from harm, provide opportunities for them to grow and develop, create a vision of something to believe in that's larger than themselves, and take an interest--a genuine interest--in the well-being of their followers.

There's a great deal of hand wringing in this book, but almost no "how-to" that can be applied in everyday organizations. He even uses the word "polemic" late in the book as a description of what he's writing. We all know what needs to be done, but very few of us are doing it.

Yes, it was interesting to read about brain chemicals and current brain research. And it was okay to read some of his comparisons between/among companies that see profit as the purpose versus those companies that see profit as a means to greater purpose. The problem is that all of this could have been stated in a pamphlet, rather than a 216-page book. And, just as his TED talk on "Start With Why" offered everything in that book, his 99U video offers everything in this book--in less than 45 minutes.

I recommend lots of books to students in my leadership development classes but, in this case, I'll recommend that the students watch Sinek's videos and save their money.
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Format: Hardcover
I really, really wanted to like this book when I checked it out from my local library, and would have been willing to plunk down the $20 or so if it was a good book I wanted to add to my personal stack. But sadlly, there's not much here that hasn't already been touched on elsewhere in other management books..."Don't just give money, give time", "Put 'we' ahead of 'I'", "Keep your team to a manageable size"...these are the type of tips you can expect to get...plus many anecdotal stories of other companies that had success with these worn-out maxims. It's readily apparent that the author is not speaking from personal experience but rather from a viewpoint of academic research.

As for all those five-star ratings, I'm suspicious of whether or not they all have actually read the book, because several of them have only a sentence or two in the comments or even no comments at all. Plus several of them are around the same date period. I'm wondering if perhaps many of these are solicited reviews or even compensated reviews. This is a practice touched on in another book, "The Four Hour Work Week" by Timothy Ferriss.

If you're looking for practicals, I'd suggest reading the works of John Maxwell like "The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership", and also "It's Not Just Who You Know" by Tommy Spaulding. Both are full of practical, "take-action" suggestions from those who have walked the walk and talked the talk.
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