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The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volume III: Century #3 2009 Paperback – July 10, 2012

3.6 out of 5 stars 40 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alan Moore is a magician and performer, and is widely regarded as the best and most influential writer in the history of comics. His seminal works include From Hell, V for Vendetta, and Watchmen, for which he won the Hugo Award. He was born in 1953 in Northampton, UK, and has lived there ever since.
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Product Details

  • Series: League of Extraordinary Gentlemen
  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Top Shelf Productions (July 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 160309007X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1603090070
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.3 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #483,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By David Swan VINE VOICE on July 8, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This volume was going to be great. It would wash away the disappointment from The Black Dossier and the less than spectacular 1910 and 1969. My all time favorite writer would come through in the end and deliver a barn burner. I so wanted to love this one but it soon became clear that this was shaping up to be more like The Black Dossier than Volume 1 (which was BRILLIANT). Still, if there's one thing Alan Moore knows how to do it's write an ending and I held out hope right up until the end before finally resigning myself to the fact that 2009 was the weakest of the three Century books. None of which were that spectacular

It's 2009, 40 years since Mina parted ways with Allan and Orlando. Orlando is fully woman when she receives a message from Prospero at the Blazing World warning that the antichrist child (from previous chapters) is nearly ready to act and the end of the world is nigh. In a panic she decides it's time to put the trio back together again to prevent Armageddon. Unfortunately the past 40 years have not been well to Mina and Allen and they may be in no condition to fight the demonic spawn.

One issue I had with 1969 was how Mina and Allen basically bore no resemblance anymore to their famous characters. Little has changed in 2009 and I just don't get a feeling like I'm reading a story featuring literary characters. I also get no vibe that Orlando is actually 3000 years old other than the frequent mentions that she/he is 3000 years old. The finale was well below what I normally expect from Alan Moore. It pains me to write this review because I've received so much enjoyment for well over two decades from Moore's writing but I'd be lying as a reviewer if I said this was anything more than a huge disappointment.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At one point during this story, someone asks Mina Harker what it's like to be immortal. She replies that the first 70 years are great, but after that...
There is a tremendous sense of fatigue emanating from our heroes here. It's 2009, Mina Harker has been missing for 40 years, Quartermain's fallen apart, Orlando has been, um, killing time and the whole Moon Child crisis seems to have been forgotten. It's only when Orlando receives a less-the-gentle reminder from the Blazing World that he/she lurches into action again.
If you've read any of the League books then you'll already know what to expect: insane numbers of literary references, vast numbers of familiar faces in the background..it's all here. There's also an extended reference to the Harry Potter books that leads me to suspect Alan Moore's not a fan, but I knew that since "Trotter Minor" popped up in Smax.
The story ends wonderfully, as the Moon Child emerges, ready to "start killing everyone". And no, I won't tell you more.

With Alan Moore's almost total withdrawal from comics, the League is the last opportunity we have of seeing him at work in this medium, and while I look forward to his novel Jerusalem as much as anyone, I am glad we have some comics by him as well.

A strong ending to the Century story.
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Since it started in the 1990s, Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen always combined nifty literary mashups with very cool and very obscure Easter eggs.

But with this latest installment in the series the Easter eggs, once again seem to overpower the plot, distracting from the main action rather than adding to the experience.

The plot is fairly simple, 40 years after we last saw them, the League reunites to oppose the anti-Christ. And at times the story shines. The anti-Christ (a very thinly-veiled parody of a popular character) manages to be creepy, scary, sad and sympathetic all at once. His two page introduction is one of the strongest scenes in the whole Century series.

But it's hard for the the book to keep momentum as the parodies, references, musical numbers and homages keep taking the reader out of the book because we're trying to figure out which TV character that is lurking in the background. Even worse a lot of times it's the main characters lurking in the background so the cameos and in-jokes can take center stage.

Finally the story ends with the appearance of another thinly-veiled character who comes out of nowhere, saves the day and leaves. It is a very well done scene, and it's about the last character in the world you'd expect to become a bad ass, but it's also a deus ex machina ending. Not the sort of thing I'd expect from a densely-written book by two celebrated creators.

Century 2009 was a good read, but it could have been great if the in-jokes were cut to make more room for the story.

And if you do get it check out Jess Nevin's invaluable annotation site for clues on what some of the in-jokes are.
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There's a lot to love in Century 2009, and unfortunately there's also a lot to hate. The novel opens with Orlando, who has undergone a pretty major personality change from how she appeared in 1910 and 1969, and it doesn't feel earned. I would argue that it's impossible to have a 40 year time skip and have character changes feel earned, as a matter of fact.

One thing I noticed in 2009 is that Moore starts to use fewer book references and begins to start making a lot of TV refereneces, and I'm ok with that. TV has long since been replacing literature as a source of entertainment and artwork, with shows like The Soprano's, The Wire and Breaking Bad deserving of being hailed as iconic pieces of pop culture like we now view Sherlock Holmes to be. The only problem is that these shows are not in the public domain and Moore obviously couldn't secure the rights to use them, so he has to engage in a lot of narrative gymnastics to avoid being sued.

That being said, the main plot of the Antichrist involves a pretty major literary reference, and one that I loved. If you read 1969 and have any knowledge of modern books, you know which one I'm talking about. This plot line saved the novel for me, and made the one's that came before a little more enjoyable. As an overall plot breakdown, I would say the first 50% of the novel is Moore resolving the consequences of the previous novel in a somewhat dull way, the next 40% when the hunt for and confrontation with the Antichrist is pure gold, honestly probably my favorite part of the entire league history, but then it gets resolved with a massive Deux-ex-Machina in the last bit that tarnishes the book as a whole.

Like Watchmen and the other League novels, Moore ended this story with a companion piece called 'Minions of the Moon'.
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