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Customer reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
31
Leapin' & Lopin'
Format: Audio CD|Change
Price:$9.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime


on August 28, 2010
This album is ranked among the top half-dozen Blue Note albums, and so it is well worth getting. If you are wondering which Sonny Clark album to buy, this is a good start for sure, but I like Cool Struttin' a bit better. Of the three albums I have, I find Sonny's Crib least interesting. Crib was recorded in '57, Struttin' in '58, and Leapin' and Lopin' in 61.
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on July 26, 2001
Sonny Clark is one of the most musical pianists I've ever heard: he makes me die of envy. This, I think, is his best album. The ability to make a song glow, to make it sound better than the first time you heard it (and liked it) in the hands of someone else, is a rare ability indeed, and Sonny has it. He's also an accomplished composer, as this album demonstrates. This is a great work of art: don't hesitate, add it to your collection, and sample it with a glass of red on a rainy night with a good friend. Why isn't jazz more popular? There's more talent in this, more emotion, than in a million copies of a Brittany Spears recording...I guess that's the fate of real art.
3 helpful votes
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on February 13, 2014
Heard the track Deep In A Dream on pandora and I stopped what I was doing to see who was behind this song that had my attention from the first few notes...I love it when that happens. I got online and downloaded the entire album immediately. I did some research on the artist....the best ones are always troubled. Beautiful music...glad to have found it.
1 helpful vote
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I recently picked up Walter Davis Jr.'s first date as a leader, "Davis Cup," and despite the strong performances by all hands I had to down-rate it because of the pedestrian tunes and arrangements, none of which provided the least hint of the singular, strikingly original, even visionary, compositions that would issue from Davis' pen beginning in the 1970's. Sonny Clark's "Leapin' and Lopin'" comes up short for the same reason but, as Sonny's last date, has to be judged the greater disappointment.

The compelling reason for purchase, besides Sonny's tasteful piano work, is the frontline of Charlie Rouse and Tommy Turrentine. A player of the first order, Rouse is well represented on Columbia, Jazzland, and Dawn but not on Blue Note. No tenor player has a more personal, inimitable sound or, for that matter, a more inventive imagination along with the pyrotechnical skills to follow it wherever it leads. (Rouse's "Takin' Care of Business" on OJC offers a veritable clinic on the limitless possibilities of the tenor saxophone.) Turrentine is usually passed over completely, almost as scarce on recordings these days as the underappreciated but towering Bill Hardman. Like his younger brother, tenor saxophonist Stanley, Tommy has a big sound and the ability to say the most with the fewest number of notes.

Sonny Clark himself is one of the most eloquent and elegant of the post-Powell generation of piano "blowers." His touch is light and full, not unlike Tommy Flanagan's. Although his left hand uses basic, Bud-like "shell" voicings, he's so sparing in his use of it that all the attention is directed to the unfailing, flowing logic of his right hand constructions. And he can improvise through a sequence of rapidly changing chords in a manner that accounts for the shifting harmonic pattern without sacrificing melodic continuity.

With the exception of the Jimmy Van Heusen standard, "Deep in a Dream," these are all undistinguished originals, reminiscent of the exercises in numerous jazz improvisation books. "Melody in C" is one of those tunes I can hear once and write down all of the harmonies for. To have to listen to an additional, alternate, even longer, version of it is a questionable use of the listener's time. Of all the originals, the only one that has sufficient inherent interest to be memorable is "Zellmar's Delight," which was not included on the original LP.
10 helpful votes
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on November 19, 2014
A must have for your Jazz collection
1 helpful vote
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on October 20, 2016
Another great blue note. Charlie Rouse sounds great here.
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on April 25, 2016
excellent
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on February 27, 2016
great album.
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on July 18, 2015
Great album
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on October 14, 2016
A good sampling of Sonny Clark. A great pianist, tragically leaving us too soon.
All well done. Other musicians excellent. Horn players are great here.
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