Buying Options

Kindle Price: $13.99

Save $0.96 (6%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Buy for others

Give as a gift or purchase for a team or group.Learn more

Buying and sending eBooks to others


Select quantity
Buy and send eBooks
Recipients can read on any device

Additional gift options are available when buying one eBook at a time.  Learn more


These ebooks can only be redeemed by recipients in the US. Redemption links and eBooks cannot be resold.

Quantity: 
This item has a maximum order quantity limit.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

<Embed>
Kindle App Ad
Learning the Language of the Fields: Tilling and Keeping as Christian Vocation by [Daniel G. Deffenbaugh]

Follow the Author

Something went wrong. Please try your request again later.


Learning the Language of the Fields: Tilling and Keeping as Christian Vocation Kindle Edition

4.0 out of 5 stars 4 ratings

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
$13.99

Length: 266 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
    Apple
  • Android
    Android
  • Windows Phone
    Windows Phone
  • Click here to download from Amazon appstore
    Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

kcpAppSendButton
Amazon Business : For business-only pricing, quantity discounts and FREE Shipping. Register a free business account

Editorial Reviews

Review

Something is bound to go terribly wrong when so many Christians see the planet as an unimportant holding place where we await salvation; or when preachers and teachers of the faith place too much emphasis on humanity's privileged status without also explaining our responsibilities to tend the garden; or when Christians see God as transcendent but not immanently present in creation. The result, according to religious studies professor Daniel Deffenbaugh, is twofold: an ecological crisis and an 'evident exodus' of ecologically sensitive individuals from churches across the country. (Sojourners)

Deffenbaugh calls Christians back to a reverence for place instead of the traditional eschewing of time on earth coupled with a yearning to be with God in heaven. . . . [He] brings ecology down to earth and challenges the Christian community to develop a new spirituality of place. (Spirituality and Practice)

Learning the Language of the Fields would be more than adequate as a book about a Christian view of ecology and environmental stewardship. And heaven knows we need to be reading those kinds of creation-care books. But it is more. As the back cover states, it 'connects ecology with ritual and spirituality with community.' Deffenbaugh writes in gentle, flowing prose even as he argues forcefully that our aggressive agricultural models have been disastrous. It is a very nice book. (Heartsandmindsbooknotes.Blogspot.Com) --This text refers to the paperback edition.

About the Author

Daniel G. Deffenbaugh teaches a variety of religion courses at Hastings College, in Nebraska. When he is not teaching or writing, Dan enjoys organic gardening, canning and cooking, fly fishing, raising chickens, bird-watching, and playing bluegrass music with his friends. --This text refers to the paperback edition.

Product details

Customer reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
4 out of 5
4 customer ratings
5 star
50%
4 star 0% (0%) 0%
3 star
50%
2 star 0% (0%) 0%
1 star 0% (0%) 0%
How does Amazon calculate star ratings?
Reviewed in the United States on December 20, 2013
Verified Purchase
Reviewed in the United States on July 18, 2013
Verified Purchase
Reviewed in the United States on October 8, 2013
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2007
6 people found this helpful
Comment Report abuse