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The Legacy of a War: Vietnam

4.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

The Vietnam War lasted longer than any other in U.S. history. On the 25th anniversary of U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam, "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer" examines the war's lasting impact through a series of panel discussions. Questions of the war's effect on politics and policy, the military and the media, and the country's psyche are discussed and debated.

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Product Details

  • Actors: Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Stanley Karnow, Richard Norton Smith, Jonathan Holloway
  • Producers: MacNeil , Lehrer Productions
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Studio: MacNeil / Lehrer Productions
  • DVD Release Date: January 28, 2008
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001390N2W
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #634,123 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

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Talking heads discuss the U.S. war in Vietnam. Several of them (Stanley Karnow - R.I.P.) are quite knowledgeable. Many are professors with mere book-learning to back them up. Skip it and go to one of the better treatments of the debacle that brought down the worlds most powerful military.
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These PBS interviews were wonderful because you hear these experts speak about several facets of the Vietnam conflict and its affect on the citizens and how we all learned several lessons, but WoW, if only these experts knew then how just a few years later, almost everyone of the lessons they said we learned would be thrown out the door over then next ten years after this interview.

One general states how America Military learned not to let their enemy have a strategic sanctuary where they can go and you can't reach, like Cambodia, Laos, etc. Wow, if only American officials would have remembered this lesson just three years after this interview when Iraq and Afghanistan were attacked and the enemy retreated over the border for sanctuary just like the General noted here.

So strange to see a group of congressmen who served in the Vietnam War gathered for this interview in 2000 to speak about the impact the Vietnam War had on how the Military will or should act in the future. Almost all these congressmen were in agreement. How things changed for these congressmen as several years later, we see them supporting various conflicts with results just like the Vietnam War. Some of these men helped push America into these devastating conflicts forgetting the words they spoke in this very interview. Very sad.

Interesting, it is discussed how TV played a big part in how the Vietnam war was viewed at home. How that changed just three years later after this interview when new cameras was basically not even allowed to film the war unless the govt gave special permission to what was filmed.
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