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Legacy: Yuri Temirkanov at BBC Proms

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

This 1992 concert includes Tchaikovsky's Manfred; tghe Pas de Deux from Nutcracker Act 2; Elgar's "Nimrod" variation from the Enigma Variations and Prokofiev's Death of Tybalt from "Romeo & Juliet."

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, Classical, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: International Classical Artist DVD
  • DVD Release Date: March 27, 2012
  • Run Time: 72 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B006VOX7PE
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #244,426 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

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Top Customer Reviews

By Gerhard P. Knapp on March 6, 2012
I was a bit apprehensive when I ordered this disk, as the Legacy series does not always live up to the best technology standards. I need not have worried: the video is very good and the audio more than convincing in this live 1992 Royal Albert Hall concert recording. The St. Petersburg Philharmonic musicians are smashingly brilliant, and Yuri Temirkanov has his army of first and second violins appropriately seated left and right (divisi) from the podium, which at this time was not a standard for many orchestras. After a spirited rendition of Berlioz' Le Corsaire overture, the concert's centerpiece is Tchaikovsky's Manfred Symphony. This fascinating piece suffers from some unnecessary repetition, and Temirkanov has made a few sensible cuts to whittle it down to approx. 48 minutes. The most intriguing change is his omission of the organ finale in favor of a somber repetition of the first movement's coda. It works very well. This said, I find his Manfred the most exciting rendition I have heard in many years, with a grippingly dramatic first movement, a properly frantic scherzo, a wonderful slow movement and a stark, hard-hitting finale. Every nuance of mood is there and every structural detail observed to make this difficult piece as cohesive as possible. If you love this music, you'll want to have this disk. There are three brilliant encores, played to the hilt, among these Elgar's "Nimrod": an elegant bow to the British audience. We are given a few camera pans on the audience. It is encouraging to see many young and culturally diverse faces in the packed Albert Hall, a hopeful sign for Britain's tradition of classical music.
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Manfred dies at the end of Lord Byron's poem after refusing to renounce his life of sin, apparently doomed to hell.

Tchaikovsky gave it a happy ending.
In the coda, he interrupts Manfred's death agonies with a majestic organ chorale, brass fanfares and a quiet fade to the end.
Seemingly Manfred has repented and is welcomed into Heaven.
I love Tchaikovsky's Manfred, but have always found this ending a disappointment.
And a bit silly.

Temirkanov throws out the happy ending, and instead splices the end of the first movement coda onto the fourth movement, which prolongs Manfred's death agony to a desperate and final conclusion.
This is more than a matter of a few cuts, such as you get with Toscanini.
What Temirkanov did was morally indefensible, but I find it a great deal more satisfying, and fun to listen to.
He betrayed Tchaikovsky, but he was true to Byron.

Yevgeny Svetlanov also used this revised ending in a 1989 CD performance of Manfred with the Berlin Philharmonic: Tchaikovsky: Manfred Symphony; Haydn: Symphony No.100
(three years before Temirkanov).
(Svetlanov's 1967 USSR Symphony recording was the first recording released in the west of Tchaikovsky's uncut original).

I wonder who gets the credit / blame for this idea: Svetlanov or Temirkanov?
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