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Showing 1-10 of 42 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 131 reviews
If Lesie Feist sounds familiar, it's because of her musical resume -- it ranges from Canadian indie-popsters Broken Social Scene to female rapper Peaches to the Kings of Convenience. That sort of resume also makes one wonder -- what will her solo debut, "Let It Die," sound like?

The answer: Stripped down, sensual pop music, with a touch of jazz and trip-hop around the edges. It kicks off with only the strums of an acoustic guitar, before Feist jumps in like an orphaned torch singer. "Well it's time to begin/as the summer sets in/It's the scene you set for new lovers," she croons.

From there on, Feist doesn't even slow down. She ventures into cheery, catchy pop like "Mushaboom," sensual slow ballads, rippling trippy songs, and smooth torch songs. There's even -- surprisingly -- a cover of the Bee Gees' "Inside And Out," which she gives a funky spin, and a delicately catchy cover of Ron Sexsmith's underrated "Secret Heart."

The flavour of Feist's music isn't the sort that sets off fireworks and sets you raving about how much fun it is. "Let It Die" is the sort of album that is periodically hailed as being the real deal -- no studio tricks, little musical polish, and a reliance on good songwriting and tunes rather than hooks. In other words, pure music.

The star of the music is Feist herself; her vocals are front-and-center, and she proves herself a rare kind of singer. No "American Idol" vocal explosions, no hyperdramatics. Instead, Feist flexes her vocals in all sorts of different ways -- breathy, husky, ethereal and coy, and and moving along with the music in perfect sync.

Not that Feist's good voice doesn't mean that the music isn't also good. Most of the instrumentation is based on piano and acoustic guitar, with snapping fingers, cowbells, a hint of synth and handclaps thrown in. It's very simple, and very pretty, whether trying out catchy pop or traditional-sounding folk. Only a few songs, like the clunky "Lonely Lonely," fail to be captivating.

Leslie Feist moves out of the shadow of the other bands and artists she's worked with, and establishes herself with the beautiful "Let It Die." A rare and good type of pop.
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on September 24, 2006
I hadn't even heard of "Feist" before my 16 year old son made me a compilation CD of various artists. I heard "Mushaboom" and was delighted. "Who IS this?" I asked him, and he told me. I felt so out-of-it, but also very happy to discover that not every female vocalist nowadays sounds like Minnie Mouse on speed, thank Heavens. There are some out there who can sing and who are not afraid to be a bit different than the mainstream. Her voice is unique, and Feist's style is hard to peg. I like that. I immediately went on Amazon, listened to some samples and read some reviews, then bought my first "Feist" CD. I have not been disappointed.
0Comment| 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
If Lesie Feist sounds familiar, it's because of her musical resume -- it ranges from Canadian indie-popsters Broken Social Scene to female rapper Peaches to the Kings of Convenience. That sort of resume also makes one wonder -- what will her solo debut, "Let It Die," sound like?

The answer: Stripped down, sensual pop music, with a touch of jazz and trip-hop around the edges. It kicks off with only the strums of an acoustic guitar, before Feist jumps in like an orphaned torch singer. "Well it's time to begin/as the summer sets in/It's the scene you set for new lovers," she croons.

From there on, Feist doesn't even slow down. She ventures into cheery, catchy pop like "Mushaboom," sensual slow ballads, rippling trippy songs, and smooth torch songs. There's even -- surprisingly -- a cover of the Bee Gees' "Inside And Out," which she gives a funky spin, and a delicately catchy cover of Ron Sexsmith's underrated "Secret Heart."

The flavour of Feist's music isn't the sort that sets off fireworks and sets you raving about how much fun it is. "Let It Die" is the sort of album that is periodically hailed as being the real deal -- no studio tricks, little musical polish, and a reliance on good songwriting and tunes rather than hooks. In other words, pure music.

The star of the music is Feist herself; her vocals are front-and-center, and she proves herself a rare kind of singer. No "American Idol" vocal explosions, no hyperdramatics. Instead, Feist flexes her vocals in all sorts of different ways -- breathy, husky, ethereal and coy, and and moving along with the music in perfect sync.

Not that Feist's good voice doesn't mean that the music isn't also good. Most of the instrumentation is based on piano and acoustic guitar, with snapping fingers, cowbells, a hint of synth and handclaps thrown in. It's very simple, and very pretty, whether trying out catchy pop or traditional-sounding folk. Only a few songs, like the clunky "Lonely Lonely," fail to be captivating.

Leslie Feist moves out of the shadow of the other bands and artists she's worked with, and establishes herself with the beautiful "Let It Die." A rare and good type of pop.
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on October 17, 2005
Good stuff. Although the music is different, it reminds me of the experience of discovering Portishead - something unusual, beautiful voice, interesting arrangements, not radio-edited.

Highly recommended to those outside the fold. And those inside, you'd love it if you heard it 57 times a day on your favorite station, why not give it a try?
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on April 30, 2005
If you like good songwriting and rich, expressive, purposefully understated vocals--then check out this CD.

Between this remarkable CD and Eddy Moran's glorious 'Girl Called Eddy' we are NOW seeing the same kind of amazing female singer-songwriter renaissance that happened 30+ years ago that gave us Carly Simon and Joni Mitchell.

'Let it Die' sets a high benchmark for all the new singer-songwriters. Leslie Feist and crew give us a dramatic and much needed dose of music that is thought-provoking, hip-shaking, heart healing and fun.
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on December 2, 2012
Feist is not just that ipod add singer. Not too precious, thank God. At first glance sounds like Carmen Bailey Rae. Very versatile album: starts with jazz singing, acoustic guitar. Goes into kind of cute but with better lyrics singing... delves into an awesome bit of 70s- early 80s sounds, about three songs like that, kind of a mix of Hall and Oates and Donna Summer. Also has some French tunes, some lonely indie type tunes, a slower, softer old-R and B sound, and even some almost Vaudeville sounding stuff.
Very good CD. Feist is an artist and her emotions come out true, with more ups and downs to each song than usual. Lyrics corresponding to that.
A+!
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on July 5, 2007
I only found out about Leslie Feist in an LA Times article in early July 2007, and bought a couple discs on a lark. Good investment. This lady is gonna go far. A less mature work than The Reminder but very high-quality work.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
If Lesie Feist sounds familiar, it's because of her musical resume -- it ranges from Canadian indie-popsters Broken Social Scene to female rapper Peaches to the Kings of Convenience. That sort of resume also makes one wonder -- what will her solo debut, "Let It Die," sound like?

The answer: Stripped down, sensual pop music, with a touch of jazz and trip-hop around the edges. It kicks off with only the strums of an acoustic guitar, before Feist jumps in like an orphaned torch singer. "Well it's time to begin/as the summer sets in/It's the scene you set for new lovers," she croons.

From there on, Feist doesn't even slow down. She ventures into cheery, catchy pop like "Mushaboom," sensual slow ballads, rippling trippy songs, and smooth torch songs. There's even -- surprisingly -- a cover of the Bee Gees' "Inside And Out," which she gives a funky spin, and a delicately catchy cover of Ron Sexsmith's underrated "Secret Heart."

The flavour of Feist's music isn't the sort that sets off fireworks and sets you raving about how much fun it is. "Let It Die" is the sort of album that is periodically hailed as being the real deal -- no studio tricks, little musical polish, and a reliance on good songwriting and tunes rather than hooks. In other words, pure music.

The star of the music is Feist herself; her vocals are front-and-center, and she proves herself a rare kind of singer. No "American Idol" vocal explosions, no hyperdramatics. Instead, Feist flexes her vocals in all sorts of different ways -- breathy, husky, ethereal and coy, and and moving along with the music in perfect sync.

Not that Feist's good voice doesn't mean that the music isn't also good. Most of the instrumentation is based on piano and acoustic guitar, with snapping fingers, cowbells, a hint of synth and handclaps thrown in. It's very simple, and very pretty, whether trying out catchy pop or traditional-sounding folk. Only a few songs, like the clunky "Lonely Lonely," fail to be captivating.

Leslie Feist moves out of the shadow of the other bands and artists she's worked with, and establishes herself with the beautiful "Let It Die." A rare and good type of pop.
0Comment| 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on July 26, 2014
I was glad to see this title come out on vinyl. I've been a fan for a while and own "Metals" & "The Reminder", both on vinyl.

"Let It Die" is actually sonically superior to those two lps. I've been somewhat inconsistent in my own mind as to which of her lps I like the best. Feist can be an acquired taste for some I suppose, but give her a listen, I think she'll grow on you.

This vinyl is sourced from GZvinyl, I'm not a fan of their vinyl (formulation), as it's noisy. Clean it well and after a few plays, it does seem to be less noisy. This is part of the "Back To Black" vinyl series. I can only assume that other lps in this series will be using the GZ vinyl. Sadly, this was the vinyl used on the latest Dire Straits excellent sounding re-issues, but still had noisy vinyl.

Artist 5 stars
Content 4.5 stars
Sonics 4.5 stars
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on January 12, 2006
I'm glad I picked this disc off of the year end recommendations list. It's a great mellow but catchy disc w/ her beautiful voice. I would highly recommend this disc.
0Comment| 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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