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Let's Get It Started

4.7 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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Editorial Reviews

12 Tracks
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B000007PSQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,716 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
It makes me sick to think that these so called hiphop purist dissed Hammer for going commercial in the early 90's. Everybody dissed Hammer from 3rd Bass to Tribe Called Quest to Ice Cube. Yeah, Mr. "Are We There Yet" Ice Cube. Hammer was not the best lyricist but he was and still is one of the best entertainers hiphop ever had. These dudes dissed and tore down Hammer then went even further than he did. Every rapper that has commercials, cartoons, label deals, merchandise all got it from Hammer because he did it first. The guys that break ground first are always the one that pay the price for everything that comes after it.

Peace to MC Hammer, 2 Big MC and Oaktown's 357 (Juicy still got me going crazy).
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a classic hammer album. Lone Mixer's mixes are great, and MC hammer hits hard like a nuclear shower for sure! The album is a bit short, less than 10 tracks but for $4? itunes CANT TOUCH THIS! Great album, amazing value.

My favorite track on this album is "these are my words" the song is amazing when on the 5th rocky soundtrack, but the first mix is mediocre. Overall if you are a big MC Hammer fan pick this up!

There are some other neat tracks on this album, such as Let's Get It Started, the title track, and Son Of The King, which calls out fake rappers.All the sounds are built for club music, and the lyrics are deep and powerful on this short CD.

The shipping was quite expensive $4 for a cd. I looked it up and it should only cost like $2. Kinda shady if you ask me.
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Format: Audio CD
Okay, let's not get carried away here people. While this album is good, it's definitely not a 4 or 5 star album. There are some tight joints on the album, but most of the songs are nothing more than average. There are classic joints on the album like "Let's Get It Started", "Pump It Up", and "They Put Me In The Mix", but most people fail to realize that, with exception of "Pump It Up", the remixes for the previously mentioned songs were 10 times better. Think about it, the remix for "Turn This Mutha Out" is WAAAAAAAAY better than the album version and the same could easily be said for "Let's Get It Started". It's the remixes that everyone was buying in '88 and that's why this album didn't really sell like it should've. The album versions are still dope though.

There are most definitely some suspect joints on the album. The ones that come to mind are "You're Being Served", "It's Gone", and "Son Of The King". And "Feel My Power" is just plain wack. Also, the fact that MC Hammer produces every song on the album makes most of the songs sound alike.

This album isn't bad at all, but it's not the awesome thrill ride that the other reviewers say it is. I would have to say that the good songs definitely make this album worth owning. There are some great songs on this album that got the party started back in '88 and they might still get your party started today. I'd reccomend buying it.

Standout Tracks: Let's Get It Started, Pump It Up (Here's the News) (My Favorite), They Put Me In The Mix, Cold Go MC Hammer, That's What I Said, and Turn This Mutha Out
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Format: Audio CD
Funk upon a time there was this young Oakland sports enthusiast named Stanley,who one day formed a Christian rap group. By the mid 80's a couple former members of the Oakland A's loaned the now renamed Hammer money to start up his own production company to begin recording on his own. Signing with Capital Records and recording a couple of singles? He dropped this debut album,produced by Con Funk Shun's Felton Pilate and...well let's just say little did MC Hammer know what was to come.

The title song,"Ring 'Em" and "They Put Me In The Mix" are all uptempo mixtures of stripped down freestyle dance rhythms with equally rhythmic turntabling and the call/response vocals of go-go funk. Basically the formula for Hammer's future sound. "Cold Go Hammer","Feel M Power" and "Pump It Up (Here's The News)" are more Run DMC style,slower hip-hop jams. "You're Being Served" has a Brazilian percussive vibe to it's bare drum machine/percussion sound while "It's Gone" builds itself around the iconic blues guitar wail of BB King. "That's What I Said" similarly revisits Curtis Mayfield's "Freddie's Dead".

"Son Of A King" is a mid tempo electro funk ballad referencing Hammer's religious back round while "Turn This Mutha Out" of course is a good example of P-Funk references hip-hop of the late 80's. This album musically has one foot in hip-hop's past and the other in it's near future. The mid 80's Jam Master J type drum machine and turntable hip-hop style is still big here. But so is something else. Hammer's rap style is much more in the league of talk singing than most-rapping more to a specific melody than the rhythm of the song. That made him ideal for an early pop/rapper because his approach and funk/soul sampling and flat out re-making appealed to older non hip-hop fans. Even with all this? Hammer's career truly was just getting started.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This man here is a GREAT RAPPER, hate the world gave up on him, and threw him under the bus......The same thing he was doing back then, rappers are now doing it(i.e. RACKING UP ON ENDORSEMENTS, AND EXPANDING THEIR BRAND through acting, commercials, books, etc..etc)but when he was doing it, he was labeled as a SELL OUT......smh
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