Truck Reviews Beauty Best Books of the Month Men's slip on sneakers nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc Weekly One PCB for select Bang & Olufsen Fire TV Stick Grocery Handmade Personalized Jewelry Shop by look Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon Find a new favorite show Find a new favorite show Find a new favorite show  Echo Fire tablets: Designed for entertainment Kindle Paperwhite GNO Shop now STL18_GNO



on March 21, 2016
This book helped me heal after my mothers death December 1st. I was a wreck with grief for 2 1/2 months. I had that 1% doubt in my mind that maybe, just maybe, there wasn't a Heaven after all. I started drinking (every day)! I was a mess!
I read this in two days, and was "healed"! I felt so much better after reading it, that I gave it to someone else to read who was also grieving her fathers death.
17 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on January 14, 2018
This book was recommended to me by someone in 1975, which I read eagerly at the time. It was right after my maternal grandmother died, and the year Life After Life was a best seller. This was very comforting to me. There's no phoney hocus pocus, no exaggeration. The book is based on solid medical research. Last month I ordered a copy for my friend who will soon lose a loved one. The ladies are good friends, aged in their 80s and 90s. They're next door neighbors in the wing in which I live, in a retirement building. I gave this book to the recipient, and she read half of the book at first sitting, reading all night. She has thanked me several times over, as she has derived much comfort from it. Now, she says, she has a new perspective on the inevitable change every human will eventually make. We should consider our "lost ones as "elsewhere," rather than dead. They aren't lost at all. I'm glad I read the book back in the mid 70s, and I am pleased that this has comforted my friend.
3 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on September 10, 2016
Great book with historic value. The interviewees have to search for words because the terms NDE, white light, life review, etc. were not in the lexicon of contemporary culture at that time. I can't believe I took so long to read it, having had an NDE myself in 1982. If I'd seen this book sooner and brought myself to read it (despite my fear of being labelled a kook), I might have sought out IANDS sooner...
8 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on March 22, 2015
First published in the late 1970s, I believe this book is still the best introduction to the phenomenon known as the "Near Death Experience" (NDE). Whether you're a believer, skeptic, agnostic, atheist, Christian, Buddhist, Jew, Wicca--makes no difference, since the experience has been documented to happen to anyone regardless of their cultural influences or upbringing. If you have heard the phrase "near death experience" but have only a vague notion of what this entails, I urge you to pick up this book and read it--if you keep an open mind, it could change your life :)

Simply put, the NDE may give us a preview of what happens to humans when we die. I first read this book around 1985 and found it both fascinating and enlightening. It is very straightforward and even-handed in it's reporting--without religious overtones from the author, although he does draw correlations between NDE's and their possible appearance in texts such as the Tibetan Book of the Dead, the Bible & Greek philosophy. At the time of publication, Dr. Moody had only investigated about 150 cases total--since then, as the technology to resuscitate patients has improved, thousands more have experienced the NDE. The book also created an open dialogue about NDE's and many more who had kept the experience secret (for fear of being ridiculed) have come forward with their story.

If this book whet's your appetite for more on the subject (and much has been written about NDE's since) let me recommend a few more titles for continued reading:

The Light Beyond by Raymond Moody -- in my opinion, the best of his follow-up books on the subject.
On Life After Death by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D. -- One of the pioneers of NDE research & best known for defining "The 5 Stages of Grief & Dying." She & Moody were both studying NDE's at the same time without being aware of each other's research.
The Tunnel and The Light by Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D. - Another collection of her writings & lectures on the subject of NDE's.

Although there are many more books on the subject (some by researchers, others by those who experienced an NDE firsthand) I always recommend these first as they are well-researched and, in my opinion, present the subject with the least amount of bias.
27 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on August 23, 2017
Excellent book that uses a structured methodology in building a solid case for the afterlife. If this book changes you - it can only be for the better. I'm hooked on the NDE topic now after hearing Moody's reasearch. It's providing a lot of answers for me to modern questions that arise in all aspects of faith. These accounts pair well with all faiths in the fact that "love" should be at the root of everything we do during our lifetimes. Read only if you are ready to be awakened to the truth beyond this physical realm.
4 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on March 23, 2016
This is one of the most life-changing books I've ever read. If you read all the reviews you'll find Dr. Moody has endured a lot of negative press from those who feel threatened by his findings. Sad. He is positive and as unbiased as any researcher could be. He basically discusses evidence showing there may be life after death from the point of a news reporter reporting on a collection of interviews where there's a common thread. That's as unbiased as it gets.
4 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on December 31, 2016
The book is mainly recollections of people's near-death experiences. However, the recollections are often quite brief (some as short as a few sentences), so the book leaves you wanting more. After a while, you realize you're just reading story after story after story of people's experience with almost crossing over, but nothing in-depth. I was hoping for a little more, but ultimately the book gives insight and some reassurance.

~*Moody Thursday*~
2 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on August 21, 2016
This book isn't proof of the after life. And I don't think that was Raymond Moody's intent was to offer irrefutable evidence of life after life, but for anyone who wants to hear stories from people who've had interesting experiences near death, they're told well in this book. As depressing as a book about death might seem, this book left me feeling positive and reignited my curiosity about the nature of our lives here. Maybe there is a life after life...

But I found it strange that everyone's personal experience was so pleasant. Seems like Raymond Moody is just telling us what we want to hear. 'Now now there's no need to worry.. Death isn't so bad" is almost what it feels like. I know I've heard about death experiences that weren't so pleasant. Why did Raymond Moody exclude the more negative experience?

Non the less, still a heartwarming and interesting book to read.
8 people found this helpful
|11 comment|Report abuse
on August 26, 2017
I really enjoyed this book, it gave me a whole new perspective on death and what follows. With all the research and interviews the author did, it's hard not to believe that there actually is a Life after Life.. I think everyone that might be afraid of death should read this book, it could just change their lives!!
2 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse
on May 11, 2017
This is a wonderful book! It is written in clear, easy-to-understand English, and is very clear in describing this complex subject. I read it when it first came out, and have had to buy it multiple times, because I keep giving it away to somebody who needs the information. It is THE book to read first if you are new to the concept of Near Death Experiences. It painlessly gives you the language and concepts you need to know, enriched by case study quotes.
3 people found this helpful
|0Comment|Report abuse