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Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee 8.2.1997 Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1565844025
ISBN-10: 1565844025
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Essential reading. -- Kirkus Reviews

Smith (Comanche) and Warrior (Osage) have fashioned a highly readable history of Native American activism. -- Choice

Told with a rare mix of passion and objectively. People who want to understand the Indian history of this century will have to read this book. -- Martin Cruz Smith

[Like A Hurricane] is a thorough and workmanlike study of a critical period in recent Indian history. -- San Francisco Examiner

[Smith and Warrior] sharpen our understanding of what exactly went on during the brief but passionate and paradigm-shifting Indian rights movement between 1969 and 1973. -- Booklist
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The New Press; 8.2.1997 edition (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1565844025
  • ISBN-13: 978-1565844025
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #129,221 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This book picks up where Dee Brown's Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee leaves off. I was afraid when I ordered this book that it would be too politically technical, but it wasn't at all. It really held my interest right from the beginning. It's the first insight that I've really been exposed to about the Native American Civil Rights Movement. The authors really tried to be as unbiased as possible by not only exposing the deceit of the US Government, but by also exposing the weaknesses and mistakes within the Native American factions who were originally involved in the early movement. After reading this book, my wish is that some day I'd love to have dinner with Dennis Banks and Russell Means. What interesting conversation and stories they could tell!!! What true (Native) American heroes they are!
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As suggested by the title, Like a Hurricane is a dedicated history of the struggle for Native American rights. It covers the formative period, including the takeover at Alcatraz and the BIA building in Washington. It does a great job of stringing the events together and showing causes and effects.
This book is generally for those interested in modern Native American History, government tactics for derailing racial movements and people in need of background for dealing with the plethora of Native American activists communities.
I really enjoyed Like a Hurricane, but my only qualification is that the epilogue of Wounded Knee seems incomplete. What about the disappearances and murders of AIM members and supporters in the wake of WK? Given all the extraneous biographies the book covers, why not a little more depth on the aftermath of the central event? Understanding Peltier's situation (which was alluded to) requires an understanding of the context of violence and repression on Pine Ridge following the WK uprising. Nevertheless, excellent background work and a fantastic piece of qualitative research.
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Format: Paperback
The book is good, but it does not include anything on the much-needed social programs started by or with help from the American Indian Movement. For example, The Legal Rights Center, Heart of The Earth Survival School, Red School House, International Indian Treaty Council, Little Earth of United Tribes housing project, Women of All Red Nations, American Indian Opportunities Industrialization Center (AIOIC), Anishinaabe Akeeng, National Coalition on Racism in Sports & Media, and the Elaine Stately Peacemaker Youth Center, etc. These are just the programs begun in the Twin Cities of Minnesota, not to mention others around the country. In most books about AIM, not just this one, alot is said about the headline-making occupations and trials, but nothing is mentioned about the equally, if not more important social service work done by AIM. Readers should know this about AIM too. Thank you. Megwech.
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Format: Paperback
I found the book most interesting, it has inspired me to find out more about the subject. I feel that the book benefitted from its comments on the failures of the movement, as well as it pulling on many varying sources, giving unbias opnions on the facts. The book was enthralling in many parts as you learnt first hand the feelings that people experienced in this time of 'reveloution', and also the great lengths that many went to, so that they could say they were part of the movement. An excellent read.
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Format: Paperback
Well written book by Native Americans who write an objective history of the 60's style Indian movement that merged into Dennis Banks' American Indian Movement. The first section about the Alcatraz take over is very informative about the Bureau of Indian Affairs plan to move Indians off the reservation to assimilate them in Cities. Unfortunately, many of the Indians that relocated off the reservation ended up in their own Ghettos in poverty. However, these urban Indians such as the Mohawk Russell Oakes get personally involved in the take over of Alcatraz. The authors define well how the plans to take over landmarks comes about, the value of publicity and they bluntly
describe the failures in organization. The failures botch attempts to take Ellis Island and leave the Trail of Tears caravan virtually without shelter which inadvertently results in the take over of the BIA building. Unfortunately, the movement seems to falter with acts of vandalism, burning of a building in Custer, South Dakota and the destructiuon of buldings at the seige of Wounded knee and the unfortunate circumstance of kidnapping. The damage to property, reports of alchol abuse such as the get together in Warrenton, VA. undermines the movement in my mind. Thse acts seemed to diminish the goals of the Indian Movement although the authors make a point that even Martin Luther King could not control all the elements of his movement. Although the actions of AIM do obtian publicity and sympathy for their movement, the authors ironically note that their followers never materialize in large numbers. The book peaks with the reoccupation of Wounded Knee that succeeds as a great reminder of the mistreatment Indians in the past and invoking tribal rivalry between the current council President and AIM.
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