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Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible 1st Edition

4.8 out of 5 stars 47 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0470251287
ISBN-10: 047025128X
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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Learn all the command lines for all Linux shells in this one-stop guide

There's a lot to be said for going back to basics. Not only does this Bible give you a quick refresher on the structure of open-source Linux software, it also shows you how to bypass the hefty graphical user interface on Linux systems and start interacting the fast and efficient way—with command lines and automated scripts. You'll learn how to manage files on the filesystem, start and stop programs, use databases, even do Web programming—without a GUI—with this one-stop resource.

  • Understand the Linux desktop and various command-line parameters

  • Learn filesystem navigation, file handling, and the basics of bash shell commands

  • Write shell scripts to automate routine functions and reports

  • Harness nesting loops and structured commands

  • Monitor programs, master file permissions, and make queries

  • Run scripts in background mode and schedule jobs

  • Use sed, gawk, and regular expressions

  • Explore all alternate shells, including ash, tcsh, ksh, korn, and zsh

About the Author

Richard Blumhas worked in the IT industry for over 18 years as both a systems and network administrator. He has administered UNIX, Linux, Novell, and Microsoft servers, as well as help design and maintain a 3,500-user network utilizing Cisco switches and routers. He has automated network monitoring with Linux shell scripts and written scripts in most of the common Linux shell environments. He is the author of several books, including Professional Linux Programming (Wrox) and Linux For Dummies, 8th Edition (Wiley).
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 840 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (May 12, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047025128X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470251287
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 1.9 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,416,364 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Michael on May 17, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By the time I bought this book, I had already read a lot of online resources about bash scripting, and I had already been using linux for two years. I had even read most of the A-plus certification book on Linux. Despite that, I was constantly struggling to write bash scripts that worked, this is because so much of the free online documentation on bash scripting is confusing and incomplete. Even when consulting co-workers, they too could not explain why so many things I tried to code in a bash script did not work. That's when I decided to buy this book.

The "Linux Command Line and Shell Scripting Bible" cleared up a lot of problems that have been plaguing me for a long time now. I wish that I had started to learn bash scripting with this book, it could have saved me a lot of time. I would highly recommend this for anybody who will use linux.

Let me list some things this book explained to me that I struggled with for years prior:
- When is a subshell made, what are the implications of that, how does variable scoping come into play.
- how can you create, manipulate, and pass around arrays in bash
- how does the "return" statement behave in functions, how to use that in an if statement
- how can you do math in bash
- the differences between [ ] and [[ ]]

Here are some other things I love about this book:
- it has an excellent explanation of how you could parse a command line that follows a complicated pattern like "mycommand --longopt -a -bcf input.txt -- foo bar zop". Before I picked up this book I thought that would be too difficult to do in a bash script.
- It explains how to easily create GUI interfaces for your script.
- It has one of the best explanations for sed and gawk I have ever seen.
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Format: Paperback
I have been a linux enthusiast for 7 years, a system administrator for 4. This provides concise explanations with outstanding illustrations that provide a comprehensive list of switches for each of the commands discussed, I really wish there was an electronic copy available.....
This should be the first book you purchase when looking to become a command line ninja.
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Format: Paperback
A good introduction to the Linux back end and a thorough description of all the basic Linux commands. From my perspective I would have liked to see less on alternate shells and more on the additional commands available as open-source routines, but on the whole this covered the field extremely well for beginners and occasional scripters who need reminding.
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By DM on July 22, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a computer science student but I have not previously focused much on shell scripting, but this book has greatly aided me in:
- understanding the history of command line interfaces and exactly what the Linux terminals are emulating
- the basics of the major shells
- administrating a Linux system with shell scripts

I find myself referencing this book more often then the textbook I was assigned for class.
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This volume is the "perennial" publication of choice for the programmer at his daily grind. Some folks can make do with just the UNIX "Man" pages. Some folks make do with peeking over other mature programmers shoulders. There are "Visual learners' and "Aural Learners." Now what if the reader is a non-distinct learner, hardware oriented, all fingers and no thumbs? Fear naught. This is precisely the book to maintain one's sanity.

Ye have graduated from Computer Assembler, Computer Tester, Computer Technician, Computer Programmer, Computer Administrator, Network Administrator, Computer Analyst, Computer Technologist, Computer Engineer, Systems Engineer, Cybernetic Engineer, but along the way the professional has forgotten most or all that was learned. This book shall bring the reader back prepared for the task at hand.

Yes that dreaded "Command Line Interface", remember MS-DOS, Apple-DOS, PC-DOS, DR-DOS, UMSDOS, etc. After all these decades its
remains the way to have uninhibited firmware and system access. Nevermind a User must have hardware access, really now. Allow the basic machine language coding get the User into the system, network to get the job done.

Does that computer at work and home have the User at its mercy? Buy this book, read it, internalize the contents, the User shall not ever fear coding again. Many successful Users have already re program their electronic calculators, tablets, and other ARM equipped devices to do more than just play games. There are UNIX, DOS, Windows, MacOS-X, and Linux operating systems. They all have one uninhibited access point...
the "Command Line". And the future is Linux, because everything runs on Linux now!
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By cattytux on December 21, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book, written in a way that I can understand. I'm starting chapter six (there are over 700 pages and 26 chapters) and the material is easy enough to comprehend. Unlike some other books on this topic, this book is current (2015) and doesn't read like it's been translated into English or written in broken English. My wife got me this book as my Christmas gift and I'm thoroughly enjoying every word! I'm VERY happy!
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