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My Big Lie (A Little Bill Book for Beginning Readers) Paperback – May 1, 1999

3.8 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-3-Cosby continues his easy-reader series with this story within a story. Little Bill retells the traditional "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" and relates how he has been banished to his room for making up a "BIG FIB" to cover up his tardiness. Once he confesses and sees himself in the folktale, he realizes that he deserves his parent's anger and punishment. Cosby's comic sense is not clearly in evidence in this didactic story, but he does meet the increasing demand by adults for children's books that illustrate moral issues. The sophistication of this book is found in Honeywood's collage illustrations. The artist's skilled use of flat color creates vibrant pictures that convey drama and emotion that are anything but flat.
Pat Leach, Lincoln City Libraries, NE
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Lexile Measure: 400L (What's this?)
  • Series: Little Bill (Book 8)
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Cartwheel (May 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590521616
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590521611
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #889,773 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Every year my students have a choice of choosing a book from the stack of 'Little Bill' books, and this one is always the first one they pick. The moral of this story is one that not only teachers wish to inflict, but parents, as well. It has a great way of introducing THE BOY WHO CRIED WOLF story into the classroom. I also enjoyed how it introduced a way to discuss the definition of a "fib". This book was great for my students because we were able to explore in more detail the meaning of true "trust". I recommend this book to every teacher and every parent of elementary aged children.
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Format: Paperback
I cannot believe this is a children's book! I don't think that Bill Cosby's wrongdoings are appropriate material for kids. It's bad enough that Bill Cosby did these horrible things, now he's glorified them in this autobiographical children's book! Disgusting!

On the plus side, I did get a kick out of the illustrations.
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Format: Paperback
This book is okay; however, I feel that the title is a bit misleading, as this story only tells of Bill's 'little' lie.
I was disappointed that it never addressed the "Big Lie", as I had hoped to learn some of Bill's "tricks of the trade" in his telling of the story.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd rather just read "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" to my 5 and 6-year-old grandchildren. This book is a bit too long for a read-aloud, and younger kids may be a bit confused by the use of the first person storyteller. You still have to have the discussion about honesty and trust after reading either this book or "The Boy Who Cried Wolf." The Cosby book would do well, however, for the beginning reader for whom it is actually intended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't like the fact that Little Bill didn't make it back home in time for the important family dinner, but it's really interesting that he almost made his dad call the police for nothing real by fibbing about what he ended up doing.
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Format: Paperback
The story starts off with Little Bill imagining he's the boy from The Boy Who Cried Wolf because his parents are making him copy it because he lied. He says how tending sheep is BORING, so he cries wolf to spice things up (and the rest of the story is told too). Then Little Bill tells you what he did (which I think is a little backwards. I would have told what he did, THEN talk about The Boy Who Cried Wolf as he makes connections between the two, but no connections are made until the end.)

The lie he tells is that he's late coming home because a man wanted directions so he GOT IN THE CAR with him to show him the way. OMG! That could be a conversation starter to talk about NOT doing that I suppose. However, he messes up in his story, so his parents KNOW he's lying the whole time.

Then Little Bill says that the boy in the story lost people's trust. He then asks them, do you still trust me? (Even though he never REALLY deceived them at all) and they INSTANTLY say, "Yes we trust you." The book doesn't say, trust takes time to mend and build. Nope, instantly they still trust him. That's taking The Boy Who Cried Wolf and totally ruining the message!

Just read The Boy Who Cried Wolf instead.
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Format: Paperback
I teach first grade. My students love this book because the children in this book are just like them! I like the book because it is easy for them to read, has great pictures, and is in the form of a short chapter book so they feel they are smart readers. I also like the morals and lessons in the book. This book and other Little Bill books are great!
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Format: Paperback
This is the only book of Bill Cosby's that I've read and it was a big disappointment. I agree with the commenter who advised simply reading the book The Boy Who Cried Wolf.

The parent's response at the end of the book reinforces lying. It's like saying to the child, you can tell tall tales and we'll still trust you with no discussion needed. That would have been an opportune time in the story line for the parents to have a discussion with Little Bill about how lying can result in people not trusting him and how he'd have to work to build their trust again. Having the parents educate the child about the consequences of lying would help tie the second part of the story in with the first chapter about the boy who cried wolf.

I'm afraid I can't recommend this book. There are other children's books out there
that better address this subject.
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