Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Trade in your item
Get a $5.31
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Little Boy: The Arts of Japan’s Exploding Subculture Hardcover – May 15, 2005

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$102.58 $25.33

Art of Coloring: Disney Animals: 100 Images to Inspire Creativity and Relaxation by Disney Book Group
"Art of Coloring" by Disney Book Group
Coloring books with a sumptuous Disney twist. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Internationally renowned Japanese artist Murakami interprets the complexity of postwar Japanese art in a defining and spectacularly well-illustrated bilingual (English and Japanese) volume. Murakami coined the term superflat to describe the two-dimensional aspect of manga (comics) and anime (animated television and film), pop-culture media that have greatly influenced Japanese fine art. But superflat has societal implications as well, which are revealed when Murakami and his contributors trace the impact of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Japanese art and culture (Little Boy is the code name of the atomic bomb that devastated Hiroshima); analyze kawaii, the culture of cuteness (think Hello Kitty); and dissect the pop-culture movement known as otaku. A dazzling array of works--ranging from the first Godzilla movie to the anime masterpiece Neon Genesis Evangelion to the provocative paintings of Chiho Aoshima--is accompanied by essays that delve deeply into their sources, themes, and resonance. The result is a superlative overview that will thrill manga and anime enthusiasts, and open up a new world of cutting-edge aesthetics and social critique to readers unversed in the fully loaded imagery and daring styles of Japan's globally embraced artistic innovations. Donna Seaman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

“Highly engaging and accessible. . . . not only a window onto the East, but a valuable resource and a fascinating read.”


(Art Documentation)
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 298 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Bilingual edition (May 15, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300102852
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300102857
  • Product Dimensions: 11.3 x 9.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,240,627 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
80%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
20%
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By William Benzon on July 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Here's an email I sent to a friend about the Little Boy exhibition and this book:

I spent Friday afternoon at the Japan Society viewing the Little Boy exhibition, curated by Takashi Murakami - and I purchased the handsome exhibit catalogue, Little Boy: The Arts of Japan's Exploding Subculture (edited by Murakami, with commentary and essays in English and Japanese).

The exhibition title, of course, is the name of the atom bomb dropped on Hiroshima and that event is a recurrent theme and background for the exhibit. But it also points toward the apparent childlike drift of Japanese pop culture as evidenced by the kawaii craze. Murakami has two essays in the catalogue, the first of which is "Earth in my Window" (pp. 98-149). The essay has an image from "Howl's Moving Castle" as its frontispiece, opens by talking of the historic Little Boy, moves through the assertion that "everyone who lives in Japan knows-something is wrong" and quickly arrives at "Kawaii (cute) culture has become a living entity that pervades everything. With a population heedless of the cost of embracing immaturity, the nation is in the throes of a dilemma: a preoccupation with anti-aging may conquer not only the human heart, but also the body. It is a utopian society as fully regulated as the science-fiction world George Orwell envisioned in 1984: comfortable, happy, fashionable-a world nearly devoid of discriminatory impulses" (p. 100). I've not read the essay in full.

The exhibition was quite interesting, steeped in manga and anime.
Read more ›
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Little Boy: The Arts of Japan's Exploding Subculture" is far and away the most beautifully-designed and edgiest book ever issued by the Japan Society in New York. At the same time, it is the most significant. That the bilingual "Little Boy" catalogue is so stunningly beautiful and up-to-the minute reflects the fact that it was edited and produced in Japan by the graphics artists driving the trends it documents. The art it examines is, as Alexandra Monroe of the Japan Society puts it, a superflat "cartoon imagery of exploding mushroom clouds, fantastic mutant monsters, and baby-faced cyborg heroines." This art bears some resemblance to that of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, but even the art of these two icons cannot begin to hint at the revolution in graphic design that has occurred in Japan. Nor can their art prepare us for the revolution of meaning that this graphic art has assumed for the Japanese of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

And it is this last point that brings us to the seminal importance of "Little Boy" as both a book and exhibition.
To return to Munroe's essay, with which readers may prefer to begin the book, in countries other than Japan animated films, cartoon-like graphics, and comic books are typically associated with children alone. In Japan, in contrast, these art forms have been appropriated by adults as well as the art mainstream. Of greatest importance, they have become a major means by which the Japanese are attempting to deal with the dual traumas of the 1945 atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the postwar dependency that a US-written constitution imposed on Japan as a player on the world stage. If such traumas were being reflected in the graphic arts alone, this phenomenon would be perhaps no more than an interesting oddity.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Great value, thank you. Was the best alternative when looking for this particular title online for a very good price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I attended the show in New york and wished to have a catalog. They were all sold out but reccomended that I go to amazon. I was quite pleased. Very visual and informative. Be for warned not a product for children. It is true to form of Japense culutre in animation and graphics. If you have a chance I highly reccomend you go to the exhibit.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Murakostabi (Murakami + Mark Kostabi) This grating exhibition and premise mines the discards of Japanese art history (Okamoto) and gloms on to the earlier actual historical greats. At the hilarious symposium Murakami was reduced to being called Little boy himself! it was hilarious to watch and hear. Finally he is moving out and away from the artworld like Peter Max and yesterday's news. The exhibition is calculating (the use of mushrooms- halucinogens- and Mushroom clouds, Article 9 - predictable) The big black mushroom cloud painting was really conceived by one of his under-paid assistants Mariko Suzuki and he tries to take credit. It is a cloying show with very little merit. Seeing Superflat in Tokyo and being suspicious of it then this new incarnation of it reeks of the same stunts that troubled sitcoms use. It is begging for substance. The works of Makoto Aida or Tenmyouya hisashi or even the toys and magazines by dehara have much more substance. Think I am pissed? well search these out and you might be surprised at the rich depth of REAL JAPANESE ART, not thie silly misinformation of murakostabi.
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?