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Little Lord Fauntleroy (Puffin Classics) Paperback – January 1, 1996

4.5 out of 5 stars 158 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 4-7–Transformation and redemption of a curmudgeonly Earl comes through the innocence of a poor boy living in New York City during the late 1800's. Devoted to his American mother, who has never been recognized by her aristocratic British father-in-law, Cedric Fauntleroy is summoned to England to assume the mantle of future Lord of the manor. Beguiling all he meets with his selflessness and goodness, he becomes the vehicle for reconciliation between his mother and grandfather, while rekindling the true meaning of "noblesse oblige" in his lineage. Opening with a brief biography of Frances Hodgson Burnett gives a sense of history to this moralistic Victorian tale. Donada Peters offers an admirable narration of this lengthy production. Her diction is clear and crisp, and the reading is well-paced and sensitive to the characters' inflections, bringing mood and meaning through this technique. She portrays Mr. Hobbs, the grocer, using gruff, yet personable tones, and Mary, the Irish servant, with a musical, lilting brogue. Her strength lies with the traditional voices that have more story line dimensions, such as the Earl, Mr. Haversham, and Dick. The voices for "dearest" and Cedric, the main characters, are not as striking. She fails to give a solid American accent throughout, and oftentimes Cedric's voice becomes too saccharine in order to portray his innate "goodness." During some transitions, the voices of narrator and characters blend into one. At intervals, there are split second pauses, quite often at the end of sentences during the narration. This might reflect splicing or editing and are a constant distraction The use of music or sound effects to add vitality to this antiquated tale would have enhanced it for those who are not familiar with classic British stories. Fans of Burnett and those who like a rich vocabulary would be the most receptive audience.–Tina Hudak, St. Bernadette School, Silver Spring, MD
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Series: Puffin Classics
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin (January 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140367535
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140367539
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 0.6 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (158 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,536,283 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When I was little, two of my favorite books were A Little Princess and The Secret Garden (HarperClassics) by Frances Hodgson Burnett. When I grew up, they were still favorites. So a year ago when I was buying them for my little cousin, and I noticed "Little Lord Fauntleroy", I was astounded. How did I miss such a gem?

The story of little Cedric who warms his old grandfather's heart is beautifully written and quite touching. There is also a lesson to be learned, as we watch what Cedric does with his newfound wealth. What would you do if you were suddenly gifted with such a fortune? This story is perfect for anyone who enjoyed "A Little Princess" or "The Secret Garden"!
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One again I'm embarrassed to say I've made it to fifty and never read this book. I watched an old black and white as a mid so I knew the story but that's not the same as reading it. I loved reading it and I didn't want it to end.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Forget what you think you know. "Pollyanna" is now a synonym for a cock-eyed and foolish optimist, but the original character is a tough, spunky, resilient pistol with a no-nonsense attitude. "Little Lord Fauntleroy" now often means a prissy or precious little twit in a black velvet suit. Not so. Cedric, the Lord's real name, may be kind, affectionate and passionately good-hearted and gentle, but he is also smart, observant, direct, and totally shaped by the manly virtues and graces we all admire. If there were a cool kids table in the world of Victorian fiction, Lord Fauntleroy would lead the gang by his sterling example and distinguished bearing.

Indeed, in her forward to Simon and Schuster's 2004 edition of this book, Polly Horvath described Lord Fauntleroy as being so popular that he was effectively the Harry Potter of his era. How cool is that?

So, even though this was written in 1895, and even though it is a bit stiff and prim in places, the tale of Little Lord Fauntleroy is fun, instructive and engaging. Cedric is a fascinating and appealing companion. There is no melodrama but there is much to engage the eye and ear and there is much that would amuse and entertain an adventurous but calm young reader. This kid has class and style and heart; he should not be forgotten or misremembered, and you will be pleasantly surprised and rewarded if you give this book a try.

Please note that I found this book while browsing Amazon Kindle freebies, and it read just fine on a Kindle Touch. I have no connection at all to the publisher of this book.
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By A Customer on April 27, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Little Lord Fauntleroy stirred my emotions. Would I have let my seven-year-old live with his ill-tempered grandfather who despised me? Probably not! Yet as the story unfolded, I admired the wise words and kind ways of Fauntleroy's mother, Dearest. I empathized with the mother's caring for her only child and her concern for the poor and less fortunate. This book renewed my faith in goodness and kindness. It made me reflect on all that I have.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I had never read Little Lord Fauntleroy, and after reading The Secret Garden recently, which was completely enchanting and full of metaphoric wisdom, I wanted to read more of Francis Hodgson Burnett's work. Personally, the title of this book had become associated with a rather pompous characterization as in "who do you think you are, little lord Fauntleroy?" so I had no idea what the book was even about.

To my surprise and delight, just like The Secret Garden, her drawing of the characters in the midst of their circumstances was vivid and real, and completely drew me in. With good reads such as this, I have to force myself to put the book down, so I can prolong the pleasure. From the very beginning all the way to the end, not a scene was wasted or uninteresting. Some writers spend a good deal of time explaining why their characters act the way they do, which becomes tedious.

Ms. Burnett's characters speak through their actions, and the story of the little boy who becomes a lord is simply about living spontaneously from the ideals of highest character. So much of the stories in the world today shows us humans who are tortured within by what they can't quite integrate in their lives. They don't touch the realm that this book simply opens one into, the part of humanity that is giving and loving without cause or reason. Reading this book was very refreshing. It's characters are uniquely portrayed and Ms. Burnett, in my opinion, never moralizes. Had she done so, the book would have been far less engaging.

If you want to remember your childhood feeling of delight and innocence, if you want to be filled with simple joy and delight without requiring that you be perfect, if you want to remember a part of who you are as an eternal child, I believe you will relish this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
LIttle Lord Fauntleroy has a bad rap because of its huge popularity in the late 19th century. Every mother apparently wanted their boy to be as selfless and precocious as the title character, so they dressed the innocent boy in the absurd outfit of the book - the velvet, lace collared affair that scarred a generation.
But that misses Burnett's point. She creates a world where a child of American sensibilities - raising all boats as his own tide increases - counters the old British guard which, at the time, was the lord had it all, the villagers had nothing.

My two favorite childhood books are A Little Princess and Secret Garden. And while Cedric is a little too perfect, the message and the characterization of sudden wealth leading to actual kindness is refreshing.
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